Witness Cannon at Shiloh


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Ole Miss

2nd Lieutenant
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#5
Great photo of the plaque! I had seen it quite often when it was on the field just east of the Peach Orchard. The Park decided to move it inside but don't know why. Maybe it was security reasons?
Regards
David
 

TomP

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Corinth, MS
#7
Unfortunately, the best part of this piece can not be seen since it was hung on the wall. The names of all the engagements it was in are engraved on the breech, above the cascabell.

It was moved from the field when we took the witness cannon that was on the wall and moved it to Corinth. The Corinth witness cannon was captured at Shiloh (the Union battery that owned it is uncertain) and brought to Corinth after the battle. It was given to Hoxton's (Tobin's) Tennessee Battery and it was engaged on May 9th, 1862 at Farmington during the siege of Corinth. After the siege it went south to Tupelo, but it returned for the Oct. 3-4 battle. On the morning of Oct. 4 it was recaptured by four men of Company C, 1st U.S. Infantry. This event occurred just outside the doors of the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center.

Cannon.JPG


There is an engraving on top of the barrel -
Captured Oct 4 1862
Corinth Miss
by
1 U S Inf

2.jpg
 

Ole Miss

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#9
Lieutenant Peter P. Wood commanding officer of Battery A, Chicago (Illinois) Light Artillery, did not file an Official Report after the Battle of Shiloh. In lieu of an Official Report I am offering the Illinois at Shiloh; report of the Shiloh Battlefield Commission May 7, 1904 unit history presented.
Regards
David

FIRST REGIMENT ILLINOIS LIGHT ARTILLERY. BATTERY A (WILLARD'S). Second Division (General W. H. L. Wallace's) Not Brigaded, Lieutenant P. P. Wood Commanding Battery. Battery A, in camp near McArthur's brigade on the Hamburg and Savannah road, moved Sunday morning,- April 6th, 1862, with General McArthur and the 9th and 12th Illinois infantry regiments, directly south along the Hamburg road to the support of Colonel Stuart. McArthur formed his command just east of the Peach Orchard, planting Battery A, Willard's, to the left of the road where it runs to the left of the Peach Orchard. Here the battery was efficient in helping withstand the heavy at- tack made by Jackson's Confederate brigade until two o'clock p. m., when Bowen reinforced Jackson, and, under their combined attack, McArthur was compelled to fall back. Again the battery was planted in the road in front of Hurlbut's line, where it rendered good service until four o'clock, when the Union lines, pressed back by over- whelming numbers, broke. At five o'clock p. m. the battery participated in the defense of the Landing. On Monday, Battery A was at the front with General W. T. Sherman at eight o'clock in the morning, and it continued in action with three guns during the day, doing excellent service until the enemy had disappeared from Shiloh's field. Lieut. Wood in his official report says: "I have the honor of reporting to you the part taken in the actions of the 6th and 7th inst. by Company 'A,' Chicago Light Artillery. After the commencement of the firing on the 6th, as ordered, I reported with command to Maj. Cavender, and was shortly afterwards ordered into a position to support the division of General Hurlbut on the left. We opened fire about 9 a. m., and were successful in silencing the enemy's batteries twice, with two changes cf position, when we immediately moved, taking position on a ridge near the extreme left, and opened on the enemy's infantry, posted on a ridge opposite, about 500 yards distant. This position we held for over an hour, fighting both infantry and artillery, when our support was retired, and we were forced to follow to avoid being flanked and cut off. Taking position again 300 yards in the rear, we were again after a short fight forced back, our support this time leaving in disorder. A new line being formed, we went into battery, opened, were entirely abandoned by our new support, and were obliged, reluctantly, to fall back on the re- serve, taking one of our guns off with but one horse and the cannoniers. An empty caisson was left for want of horses to draw it off, and afterwards recovered. "We were engaged during the day seven successive hours, firing 338 rounds of ammunition, with a loss of four men killed and twenty-six wounded, and a loss of killed and disabled horses of forty-eight. "On the morning of the 7th, as ordered, I reported to Gen. Sherman, with three pieces, all I had men to serve; was given a position on his left; engaged a battery, silenced it; shelled the enemy's line of battle until they gave way; advanced with our troops, opened during the ILLINOIS IN THE BATTLE 155 advance four times and remained in the engagement until the enemy broke and fled; fired during the day 334 rounds of ammunition. On this day we met with no loss."

Willard's battery, commanded by Lieutenant P. P. Wood, particularly distinguishing itself in the battle of Shiloh. It was engaged continuously during the engagements of both days. Its loss was thirty men killed and wounded, and the fact that it went into the second day's battle with but three pieces, was only because of lack of men and horses. There was a remarkable incident connected with the retirement of this battery from the Peach Orchard. A gun on which were two wounded artillerymen was being hauled away by a single horse, when it became "stalled" in the mud. Eager to save their comrades and the gun, members of the battery seized the spokes of the wheels but could not move the piece. In the midst of their heaving a minie ball struck the horse at the junction of the tail and body, and its tremendous leap took the gun out of the mire. Both of the wounded men and the gun were saved.
 



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