Wilson's Creek National Battlefield (NPS Tour Stops)

Buckeye Bill

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#1
The Battle of Wilson's Creek
August 10, 1861

Brig. Gen. Nathaniel Lyon’s Army of the West was camped at Springfield, Missouri, with Confederate troops under the commands of Brig. Gen. Ben McCulloch approaching. On August 9, both sides formulated plans to attack the other. About 5:00 am on the 10th, Lyon, in two columns commanded by himself and Col. Franz Sigel, attacked the Confederates on Wilson’s Creek about 12 miles southwest of Springfield. Rebel cavalry received the first blow and fell back away from Bloody Hill. Confederate forces soon rushed up and stabilized their positions. The Confederates attacked the Union forces three times that day but failed to break through the Union line. Lyon was killed during the battle and Maj. Samuel D. Sturgis replaced him. Meanwhile, the Confederates had routed Sigel’s column, south of Skegg’s Branch. Following the third Confederate attack, which ended at 11:00 am, the Confederates withdrew. Sturgis realized, however, that his men were exhausted and his ammunition was low, so he ordered a retreat to Springfield. The Confederates were too disorganized and ill-equipped to pursue. This Confederate victory buoyed southern sympathizers in Missouri and served as a springboard for a bold thrust north that carried Price and his Missouri State Guard as far as Lexington. In late October, a rump convention, convened by Governor Claiborne Fox Jackson, met in Neosho and passed an ordinance of secession. Wilson’s Creek, the most significant 1861 battle in Missouri, gave the Confederates control of southwestern Missouri.

* The Battle of Wilson's Creek Civil War Trust Map.

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* The Wilson's Creek National Battlefield Visitor Center.

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* Wilson's Creek.

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* Tour Stop : 1 (Gibson House Site, Mill Site and Oatfield).

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* The Ray Cornfield.

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* Tour Stop : 2 (The Ray House, Springhouse and Orchard).

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* Tour Stop : 3 (East Battlefield Overlook).

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* The Edward's Cabin (Confederate General Sterling Price's HQ).

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* Tour Stop : 4 (Sigel's Second Position).

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* Tour Stop : 5 (Sigel's Final Position - Backoff's Battery)

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* Tour Stop : 6 (Guibor's Battery).

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* Tour Stop : 7 (The Bloody Hill - Union Brigadier General Nathaniel Lyon Death Site).

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* Tour Stop : 8 (Route of Union Advance and Withdrawal).

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* Missouri State Monument (The Battle of Oak Hills - Wilson's Creek).

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* Photos Courtesy of William Bechmann (2011)
 

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Buckeye Bill

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#5
My video shows the interior and the exterior of the NPS Museum (formerly known as the General Sweeney Museum).

Awesome museum!!!

Bill
 

Buckeye Bill

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My son and I toured the Wilson's Creek, Pea Ridge and Prairie Grove battlefields in one day. We had all three venues to ourselves. It is a shame the Western Campaign American Civil War sites do not receive the notoriety like the Eastern Campaign sites, especially in the state of Virginia.
 

bdtex

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#8
The Battle of Wilson's Creek
August 10, 1861

Brig. Gen. Nathaniel Lyon’s Army of the West was camped at Springfield, Missouri, with Confederate troops under the commands of Brig. Gen. Ben McCulloch approaching. On August 9, both sides formulated plans to attack the other. About 5:00 am on the 10th, Lyon, in two columns commanded by himself and Col. Franz Sigel, attacked the Confederates on Wilson’s Creek about 12 miles southwest of Springfield. Rebel cavalry received the first blow and fell back away from Bloody Hill. Confederate forces soon rushed up and stabilized their positions. The Confederates attacked the Union forces three times that day but failed to break through the Union line. Lyon was killed during the battle and Maj. Samuel D. Sturgis replaced him. Meanwhile, the Confederates had routed Sigel’s column, south of Skegg’s Branch. Following the third Confederate attack, which ended at 11:00 am, the Confederates withdrew. Sturgis realized, however, that his men were exhausted and his ammunition was low, so he ordered a retreat to Springfield. The Confederates were too disorganized and ill-equipped to pursue. This Confederate victory buoyed southern sympathizers in Missouri and served as a springboard for a bold thrust north that carried Price and his Missouri State Guard as far as Lexington. In late October, a rump convention, convened by Governor Claiborne Fox Jackson, met in Neosho and passed an ordinance of secession. Wilson’s Creek, the most significant 1861 battle in Missouri, gave the Confederates control of southwestern Missouri.

* The Battle of Wilson's Creek Civil War Trust Map.

View attachment 76295

* The Wilson's Creek National Battlefield Visitor Center.

View attachment 76296

* Wilson's Creek.

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* Tour Stop : 1 (Gibson House Site, Mill Site and Oatfield).

View attachment 76298

* The Ray Cornfield.

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* Tour Stop : 2 (The Ray House, Springhouse and Orchard).

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* Tour Stop : 3 (East Battlefield Overlook).

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* The Edward's Cabin (Confederate General Sterling Price's HQ).

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* Tour Stop : 4 (Sigel's Second Position).

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* Tour Stop : 5 (Sigel's Final Position - Backoff's Battery)

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* Tour Stop : 6 (Guibor's Battery).

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* Tour Stop : 7 (The Bloody Hill - Union Brigadier General Nathaniel Lyon Death Site).

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* Tour Stop : 8 (Route of Union Advance and Withdrawal).

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* Missouri State Monument (The Battle of Oak Hills - Wilson's Creek).

View attachment 76308

* Photos Courtesy of William Bechmann (2011)
What are the stones in the middle and back of the Tour Stop 5 picture?
 

Buckeye Bill

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#9
What are the stones in the middle and back of the Tour Stop 5 picture?
Remnants of the Guinn (Guin, Gwin and Gwynne) House near Backoff's Battery.

After the Guinn (Gwin) farm skirmish, Sigel and Carr’s troops were ambushed by Confederate forces hidden in the forested areas along the James River. In his account of the day’s events, Sigel states that they "reached the ford at James Fork of the White River." Captain Otto Lademann, under Sigel’s command during the retreat, stated, "Our little Sigel column was joined by Capt. Eugene Carr’s company of Cavalry, and just as soon as we had crossed Wilson’s Creek at the mouth of Tyrrell’s Creek, the whole of that Confederate cavalry which we had failed to destroy, pounced upon us from flank and rear."
 
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bdtex

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#10
A high school classmate's gg grandfather was there with the 3rd Missouri Infantry(CSA). The Union 3rd Missouri Infantry was there also. He lost an arm at Vicksburg. Here is a pic of him sitting on a 1917 Harley-Davidson.

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Buckeye Bill

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#13
Nathaniel Lyon
UNION BRIGADIER GENERAL U.S. ARMY
JULY 14, 1818 – AUGUST 10, 1861


Expired Image Removed
* Union Brigadier General Nathaniel Lyon (Library of Congress)

Nathaniel Lyon attended the United States Military Academy and graduated 11th out of 52 in 1841. After graduation, Lyon participated in fighting the Seminole Indians in Florida, as well as in the Mexican American War, even though he did not support the conflict. During the war, he received several brevet promotions for gallantry under fire at the battles of Mexico City, Contreras, and Churubusco. He was then sent to posts in California where he participated in several Native American massacres. He was then reassigned to Fort Riley in Kansas, where he began to develop strong support for the Union as a result of the political climate developing in the state, known as “Bleeding Kansas.”

In February of 1861, Lyon was made commander of the Union arsenal in St. Louis, Missouri, where tensions grew between the Union soldiers stationed there and the secessionist governor of the state, Claiborne Jackson. When the Civil War broke out, Jackson refused to send volunteers from the state to fight for Abraham Lincoln. Instead, Jackson had the militia muster outside the city to begin training in preparation to join Confederate forces. On May 10, 1861, Lyon and his troops surrounded the pro-Confederate Missouri militia under General D. M. Frost, and forced their surrender. While marching his captured prisoners through St. Louis, many citizens began to riot, and provoked the Camp Jackson Affair, during which Lyon ordered his troops to fire into the rioters. On May 17, 1861, Lyon was promoted to brigadier general and was given command of Union troops in Missouri.

Once in command of all Union troops in Missouri, Lyon began to pursue the capture of Governor Claiborne Jackson and the remaining Missouri Militia. On August 10, 1861 the Union forces met a combined force of the Missouri Militia and Confederate troops under the command of Ben McCulloch near Springfield, Missouri, during the battle of Wilson’s Creek. Nathaniel Lyon was killed during the battle while trying to rally his outnumbered soldiers. Although the Confederate forces would win the Battle of Wilson’s Creek, Lyon’s efforts prevented the State of Missouri from joining the Confederacy.

* Lyon Monument near Bloody Hill (Tour Stop : 7)

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* Union Brigadier Nathaniel Lyon's body was brought to the Ray House and laid on this bed (Tour Stop : 2).

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* Photos courtesy of William Bechmann (2011)
 
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#14
Nathaniel Lyon
UNION BRIGADIER GENERAL U.S. ARMY
JULY 14, 1818 – AUGUST 10, 1861


Expired Image Removed
* Union Brigadier General Nathaniel Lyon (Library of Congress)

Nathaniel Lyon attended the United States Military Academy and graduated 11th out of 52 in 1841. After graduation, Lyon participated in fighting the Seminole Indians in Florida, as well as in the Mexican American War, even though he did not support the conflict. During the war, he received several brevet promotions for gallantry under fire at the battles of Mexico City, Contreras, and Churubusco. He was then sent to posts in California where he participated in several Native American massacres. He was then reassigned to Fort Riley in Kansas, where he began to develop strong support for the Union as a result of the political climate developing in the state, known as “Bleeding Kansas.”

In February of 1861, Lyon was made commander of the Union arsenal in St. Louis, Missouri, where tensions grew between the Union soldiers stationed there and the secessionist governor of the state, Claiborne Jackson. When the Civil War broke out, Jackson refused to send volunteers from the state to fight for Abraham Lincoln. Instead, Jackson had the militia muster outside the city to begin training in preparation to join Confederate forces. On May 10, 1861, Lyon and his troops surrounded the pro-Confederate Missouri militia under General D. M. Frost, and forced their surrender. While marching his captured prisoners through St. Louis, many citizens began to riot, and provoked the Camp Jackson Affair, during which Lyon ordered his troops to fire into the rioters. On May 17, 1861, Lyon was promoted to brigadier general and was given command of Union troops in Missouri.

Once in command of all Union troops in Missouri, Lyon began to pursue the capture of Governor Claiborne Jackson and the remaining Missouri Militia. On August 10, 1861 the Union forces met a combined force of the Missouri Militia and Confederate troops under the command of Ben McCulloch near Springfield, Missouri, during the battle of Wilson’s Creek. Nathaniel Lyon was killed during the battle while trying to rally his outnumbered soldiers. Although the Confederate forces would win the Battle of Wilson’s Creek, Lyon’s efforts prevented the State of Missouri from joining the Confederacy.

* Lyon Monument near Bloody Hill (Tour Stop : 7)

View attachment 76344

* Union Brigadier Nathaniel Lyon's body was brought to the Ray House and laid on this bed (Tour Stop : 2).

View attachment 76345

* Photos courtesy of William Bechmann (2011)
In my view, that guy right there is a certified hot-head. I don't think there's any doubt that he was courageous. I don't think there's any doubt that he led from the front. My point is that, before the land war started, he was the guy who slammed his hand down on the negotiating table in St. Louis and declared: "This means war!" That left no further room for negotiation on the other side of the table.

Some of you might think this was heroic of Lyon. I think it was reckless, arrogant and self-righteous of him. A few of you will demand sources for my opinion. Here's my source: It's my opinion.

I think Lyon was personally responsible for dragging Missouri into the war earlier than it needed to be dragged in. Yes, our Governor Claiborne Fox Jackson was probably equally hot-headed and equally guilty. But he was not the first to slam down his hand on the table.

I know that Lyon was not kind to my home town of Boonville, MO in any way on the afternoon of June 17, 1861, nor for some days afterwards.

I think he was an arrogant bxxxxxx. He was very full of himself. I'd go so far as to say he saw himself as God's avenging angel. That self concept got him killed at Wilson Creek.

My personal opinion, you understand. I don't expect everyone to agree.
 

Buckeye Bill

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#18
The Battle of Wilson’s Creek occurred on August 10, 1861. This battle was the first major engagement of the American Civil War west of the Mississippi River. It pitted a smaller but aggressive Federal army against a numerically superior force of Confederate soldiers and pro-secessionist Missouri State Guard for the future of Missouri. Despite surprising the Confederates that morning, the federals withdrew by mid-day in the face of repeated Southern counterattacks. The Southern victory bolstered Confederate sentiment in Missouri and set the stage for a bold campaign in September by the Missouri State Guard against federal forces further to the north.
 

Borderruffian

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#19
Well depicting the Missouri State Guard as pro- secessionist at this stage of the war is getting the cart before the horse, so to speak. Certainly some units did feel the state should secede at this point, but they were state troops contesting Lyon's advance through Missouri,some did muster into the CS during the time of Curtis's Pea Ridge Campaign but a great many did not.
 



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