Open Debate Wilson A. Beaver, Sr. Muster Roll

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Wilson A. Beaver, Sr., one of the old settlers and leading citizens of Carroll County, Ark., was born in North Carolina on June 7, 1831. In 1835 he was taken by his parents to Tennessee, where he was reared to manhood, coming to Arkansas when about twenty years of age. He first settled near what is now Beaver's Station, and in 1855 located on the place where he now resides. He has been a farmer all his life, and now owns 348 acres of fine land. His parents [p.1047] were Martin and Christian (Pendergrass) Beaver, both natives of North Carolina. Martin B. Beaver was born on May 4, 1800, and was reared in his native State. About 1835 he removed to Tennessee, and remained until 1851, when he came to Lawrence County, Ark., where he died soon after. His wife was born on February 14, 1801. After her husband's death she removed to Carroll County, Ark., and remained till her death, which occurred after the war. Wilson A. Beaver, Sr., was married, in 1852, to Emeline Waits, by whom he is the father of ten children, three of whom died in infancy. Those living are: Almissha, Mrs. Allen Beller; George A.; Demarius, wife of a Mr. Quick, of Fort Smith; Wilson A., Jr., a merchant at Beaver Station; Christian E., Mrs. Frank Seger, of Garden Plains, Kas., and Joseph A. This wife died in 1877, and in 1878 he was united in marriage with Martha Perkins, who is still living. She is a consistent Christian, and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. In politics Mr. Beaver is a stanch Democrat. For fourteen years he has filled the office of justice of the peace at Beaver in a manner most satisfactory to all. The post- office here, which is now called Beaver, was originally called Beaver's Ferry, at which time he served as postmaster. Mr. Beaver is an influential and one of the most honored citizens of his community. On his land is a fine stone quarry, from which the stone was taken to build the Crescent Hotel at Eureka Springs, the bridge at Fort Smith, and the Sebastian County Court-house. His residence, which was built in 1836, is one of the pioneer landmarks of the county. It is built of logs which were prepared with the broad-ax, and the lumber in it was sawed with a whip-saw. It was the "Old Confederate House" in time of the war. During the war Mr. Beaver served six months in the Confederate army as a member of Hunter's regiment of Arkansas Confederate Infantry. I am trying to find my 3rd Great Grandfather's muster roll. I have checked almost all of the m listed online and was unsuccessful.

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WILSON A SQUIRE BEAVER HEADSTONE.jpg
 

lelliott19

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During the war Mr. Beaver served six months in the Confederate army as a member of Hunter's regiment of Arkansas Confederate Infantry. I am trying to find my 3rd Great Grandfather's muster roll. I have checked almost all of the m listed online and was unsuccessful.
Hunter's regiment was the 11th Missouri Infantry. It looks like your 3x great grandfather's carded records are mis-filed with those of a man named William A. Beaver. Is Wm any kin to you? There's a whole bunch of Beavers in the 11th MO
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bdtex

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The Confederate flatstone says he was in the 6th Missouri Infantry.
 

bdtex

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lelliott19

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So I can only guess he went north into Missouri to enlist. maybe?
No. I dont know much about Missouri regiments or Arkansas ones for that matter, but the info at wikipedia says this:

"During the summer of 1862, DeWitt C. Hunter had attempted to recruit men from the Missouri State Guard to join a new regiment, which would be part of the Confederate States Army. However, Hunter was not able to recruit enough men to form a full regiment. Hunter, who had been recruiting near Van Buren, Arkansas, joined a group of recruiters who were heading into Missouri."
 

Lubliner

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No. I dont know much about Missouri regiments or Arkansas ones for that matter, but the info at wikipedia says this:

"During the summer of 1862, DeWitt C. Hunter had attempted to recruit men from the Missouri State Guard to join a new regiment, which would be part of the Confederate States Army. However, Hunter was not able to recruit enough men to form a full regiment. Hunter, who had been recruiting near Van Buren, Arkansas, joined a group of recruiters who were heading into Missouri."
I know the men in Arkansas that were being gathered up as recruits got busted up by Union raids many times, but I am unsure of those dates it happened.
Lubliner.
 
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