William McKinley: An Infallible War Hero

lurid

Corporal
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Messages
406
#1
Other than people who are historians or history buffs, McKinley isn't well known and is just deemed as the 25th President of the United States. I suppose it's not appropriate to discuss his presidency, even though he realigned the Republican Party into greatness, economically was for the working man and the father of modern foreign policy. Imo, McKinley is totally underrated as a president and his military service during the CW is more underrated.

The United States honors JFK and George Bush Sr. for their service but to my knowledge, William McKinley never get his props for his heroics and heroics they were indeed.

McKinley enters the CW out of Ohio as a private and is discharged 4 years later as a Major and received 3 battlefield commissions for valor. Recommended for the Congressional Medal of Honor but turned it down and said, "I was just doing my duty."

Undertook 2 suicide missions: one near Kernstown, Virginia, which he was ordered to ride across the battlefield under heavy fire to warn the 13th West Virginia to withdraw before they were overrun and cut and half by General Early's army, who were close to splitting the Union left. If the Rebels succeeded in driving Union forces out of the Shenandoah Valley, they might have threatened Washington, D.C..

East of Antietam Creek, after 12 hours of brutal fighting, they captured a bridge and soon enough were over the creek, sheltered from the Confederate fire. His platoon was ordered to pull out twice, McKinley ignored the orders and confiscated a wagon full of food and coffee a brought to the wounded and ailing Ohio comrades, he busted through a barrage of Confederate cannonball fire, artillery and musketry where the wagon was half blown to pieces as he arrived unharmed.

McKinley was always in the center of the action. His valor was infallible and deserves more attention than a lot of other people who got their due.
 

Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

TnFed

Sergeant
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Messages
842
#3
You're right. I recently read his most current biography. Another point. His foreign policy in the Philippines and Cuba, were gratly helped by former Confederates Fitz Hugh Lee and Joe Wheeler.
 

Potomac Pride

First Sergeant
Joined
Oct 28, 2011
Messages
1,639
Location
Georgia
#4
Other than people who are historians or history buffs, McKinley isn't well known and is just deemed as the 25th President of the United States. I suppose it's not appropriate to discuss his presidency, even though he realigned the Republican Party into greatness, economically was for the working man and the father of modern foreign policy. Imo, McKinley is totally underrated as a president and his military service during the CW is more underrated.

The United States honors JFK and George Bush Sr. for their service but to my knowledge, William McKinley never get his props for his heroics and heroics they were indeed.

McKinley enters the CW out of Ohio as a private and is discharged 4 years later as a Major and received 3 battlefield commissions for valor. Recommended for the Congressional Medal of Honor but turned it down and said, "I was just doing my duty."

Undertook 2 suicide missions: one near Kernstown, Virginia, which he was ordered to ride across the battlefield under heavy fire to warn the 13th West Virginia to withdraw before they were overrun and cut and half by General Early's army, who were close to splitting the Union left. If the Rebels succeeded in driving Union forces out of the Shenandoah Valley, they might have threatened Washington, D.C..

East of Antietam Creek, after 12 hours of brutal fighting, they captured a bridge and soon enough were over the creek, sheltered from the Confederate fire. His platoon was ordered to pull out twice, McKinley ignored the orders and confiscated a wagon full of food and coffee a brought to the wounded and ailing Ohio comrades, he busted through a barrage of Confederate cannonball fire, artillery and musketry where the wagon was half blown to pieces as he arrived unharmed.

McKinley was always in the center of the action. His valor was infallible and deserves more attention than a lot of other people who got their due.
A good book about this President is The Triumph of William McKinley: Why the Election of 1896 Still Matters by Karl Rove that was published in 2015. McKinley's election in 1896 helped the Republican Party become dominant over the following decades. In addition, the nation's victory in the Spanish-American War during his administration helped the U.S. become a global power in the 20th century. Unfortunately, his life was cut short when he was assassinated following his reelection as President.
 
Last edited:

O' Be Joyful

Sergeant Major
-*- Mime -*-
Joined
Mar 6, 2015
Messages
3,114
Location
Use-ta be: Zinn-zä-nätti o-HI-o The BIG city.
#5
A good book about this President is The Triumph of William McKinley: Why the Election of 1896 Still Matters by Karl Rove that was published in 2015. McKinley's election in 1896 helped the Republican Party become dominant over the following decades. In addition, the nation's victory in the Spanish-American War during his administration helped the U.S. become a global power in the 20th century. Unfortunately, his life was cut short when he was assassinated following his reelection as President.
Largely influenced by Mahan, and his protege. Theodore "Don't You Dare Call Me Teddy" Roosevelt.
 

lurid

Corporal
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Messages
406
#6
A good book about this President is The Triumph of William McKinley: Why the Election of 1896 Still Matters by Karl Rove that was published in 2015. McKinley's election in 1896 helped the Republican Party become dominant over the following decades. In addition, the nation's victory in the Spanish-American War during his administration helped the U.S. become a global power in the 20th century. Unfortunately, his life was cut short when he was assassinated following his reelection as President.
Yep, I have that book and it is very good. I stumbled onto McKinley in depth about 15 years ago when I did me dissertation. Totally underrated, same disposition and sensibilities as Lincoln. Economics , domestically and foreign policy he gets an (A), as far as I'm concerned he does. Of course, the revisionists who write academic books give him 2 sentences and usually blame him for starting the Spanish-American War. Yes, like Lincoln, both second terms would have been exciting to record.
 

TnFed

Sergeant
Joined
Jun 18, 2018
Messages
842
#7
Yep, I have that book and it is very good. I stumbled onto McKinley in depth about 15 years ago when I did me dissertation. Totally underrated, same disposition and sensibilities as Lincoln. Economics , domestically and foreign policy he gets an (A), as far as I'm concerned he does. Of course, the revisionists who write academic books give him 2 sentences and usually blame him for starting the Spanish-American War. Yes, like Lincoln, both second terms would have been exciting to record.
One of McKinley's problems about being underrated is that he was followed in office TR. Who did not mind blowing his own horn.
 

lurid

Corporal
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Messages
406
#9
One of McKinley's problems about being underrated is that he was followed in office TR. Who did not mind blowing his own horn.
Yep, I don't like either Roosevelt, and TR certainty did blow his own horn by putting himself on Mount Rushmore, when McKinley belonged on it.
 

Potomac Pride

First Sergeant
Joined
Oct 28, 2011
Messages
1,639
Location
Georgia
#11
Yes, after McKinley's death, the young and energetic T. Roosevelt really captured the public's attention. A lot of people forget about McKinley's accomplishments including being the last President to serve as a soldier in the Civil War.
 
Joined
Mar 3, 2017
Messages
9,911
Location
Chicagoland
#13
Yep, I don't like either Roosevelt, and TR certainty did blow his own horn by putting himself on Mount Rushmore, when McKinley belonged on it.
Borglum's work on Mt. Rushmore did not begin until 7 years after TR's death and TR was the last President picked for the monument. And Borglum himself was the only one who decided which presidents were chosen.
 

lurid

Corporal
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Messages
406
#16
Borglum's work on Mt. Rushmore did not begin until 7 years after TR's death and TR was the last President picked for the monument. And Borglum himself was the only one who decided which presidents were chosen.
I know, I was just going with the theme of some of the posts in here, even though exaggerated. I'm sure Borglum chose TR because of the aforementioned reasons that were posted in this thread. Why didn't he choose McKinley?


:rofl: sources please. McKinley served coffee
Well, you must have a 3 second attention span because you somehow missed Rove's book was mentioned. I have the sources, I just don't feel like typing all of it.
 

lurid

Corporal
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Messages
406
#17
Borglum's work on Mt. Rushmore did not begin until 7 years after TR's death and TR was the last President picked for the monument. And Borglum himself was the only one who decided which presidents were chosen.
Is there anywhere on this board to make a thread on the POTUS administrations?
 
Joined
Mar 3, 2017
Messages
9,911
Location
Chicagoland
#18
Is there anywhere on this board to make a thread on the POTUS administrations?
As far as existing forums go, I would say Lincoln, Johnson and Grant only. If your thinking about McKinley, he did serve in the Civil War but his presidential administration is probably beyond the scope of this forum. The reconstruction presidents who served in the Civil War maybe, but McKinley was elected after reconstruction. You can ask @civilwartalk his opinion if you want.
 

Eric Wittenberg

2nd Lieutenant
Keeper of the Scales
Joined
Jun 2, 2013
Messages
3,383
Location
Columbus, OH
#19
AND, he has my very favorite monument on any battlefield for heroically serving hot coffee under fire without orders. :smile:

I live in Columbus, Ohio. There's a large monument to him that was done after his assassination right in front of the State House. Visit his tomb in Canton some time--it's every bit as impressive as Grant's. He was held in enormous esteem and was immensely popular as president. All of that does overshadow his Civil War service.

That said, he was indeed an extremely capable and competent fellow. When I get home tonight, I will try to remember to post a piece that I wrote about McKinley's participation in the 1862 Maryland Campaign. It's no wonder that Rutherford B. Hayes was so fond of the young man.
 

lurid

Corporal
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Messages
406
#20
As far as existing forums go, I would say Lincoln, Johnson and Grant only. If your thinking about McKinley, he did serve in the Civil War but his presidential administration is probably beyond the scope of this forum. The reconstruction presidents who served in the Civil War maybe, but McKinley was elected after reconstruction. You can ask @civilwartalk his opinion if you want.
Appreciate the information.
 



Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Top