Why The Sentimentality Toward The South?

Lubliner

Captain
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
Disagree. You guys have awful weather.

Take this with a grain of salt, however. We Southern Californians are weaklings when it comes to weather. Anything below 55 triggers complaints from us.
Sort of funny, like a Richard Pryor routine talking about Chicago weather compared to the south. 'You southerners go out when it's 55 and be chilled.' Anyway, we had friends visit us from Canada from up near the Falls, that stayed with us during the fall in Virginia. It was blustery cold to my brother and me, and they were out in short sleeves. "This isn't cold at all!"
Lubliner.
 

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
Every region has people who feel attached and sentimental. Many of the reasons people list as reasons for that sentimentality could be said about the other regions just as well. There are more similarities than differences. Some regions just obsess and boast more about their own exceptionalism.

Mostly, it just boils down to what feels like home. And that's all it is. Feelings.
 

Cycom

Sergeant
Joined
Feb 19, 2021
Location
Los Angeles, California
Every region has people who feel attached and sentimental. Many of the reasons people list as reasons for that sentimentality could be said about the other regions just as well. There are more similarities than differences. Some regions just obsess and boast more about their own exceptionalism.

Mostly, it just boils down to what feels like home. And that's all it is. Feelings.
You’re correct, and even though I’m a “facts over feelings” person, I can’t discount just how important culture is (for both good and bad) in the formation and identity of a people.

In regard to the boasting, I’ve generally never seen it. Yes, there are those that are more strident in their regional pride, but to me it’s never been arrogant or boastful. YMMV.
 

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
You’re correct, and even though I’m a “facts over feelings” person, I can’t discount just how important culture is (for both good and bad) in the formation and identity of a people.

In regard to the boasting, I’ve generally never seen it. Yes, there are those that are more strident in their regional pride, but to me it’s never been arrogant or boastful. YMMV.
It reminds me of a joke...

A Texas rancher and a Wisconsin farmer are talking. The Texas rancher brags, "I get up in the morning, get into my truck, and I don't reach the edge of my property until dusk."

The Wisconsin farmer says, "Yeah, I used to have a truck like that."
 

Will Carry

First Sergeant
Joined
Jun 1, 2015
Location
The Tar Heel State.
Respectfully, you are assuming much from my OP. I’m looking at the issue with both a literary & practical sense. My responses which followed showed that. I can restate it here: my romanticism for the South is tempered by the stain of slavery.

I’ve read through some outstanding responses from both sides, but even those sentimental ones don’t discount the problem of slavery. Your other opinions about the weather and the slow pace of life are yours alone and I don’t think justify the sentimentality some feel (or not) for the region. For example, I’m ambivalent toward Southern California weather and it really does nothing to change that my first generation roots here in the U.S.

Regarding that my comments are influenced by “reading a book,” which one would that be and where did I mention it? It’s likely you’re referring to some other person.

edit: looks like you’re referring to Shelby Foote’s The Civil War. My mistake. A fantastic history which is giving me a factual taste for that time and place. About 1/5 of the way in so far...just incredible facts not tainted by any overt sentimentality.
The South has come a long way in dealing with our sorted past. We have so many refugees from the people's republic of California and the great state of New York (My wife is from NYC) that we have become a melting pot. I will say that California is the most beautiful place in America and the people are every bit as friendly as us Southerners.
 

Cycom

Sergeant
Joined
Feb 19, 2021
Location
Los Angeles, California
The South has come a long way in dealing with our sorted past. We have so many refugees from the people's republic of California and the great state of New York (My wife is from NYC) that we have become a melting pot. I will say that California is the most beautiful place in America and the people are every bit as friendly as us Southerners.
Well, thanks...but honestly this is the first time I’ve seen others refer to us as friendly! Living where I do in L.A., people are friendlier than in the urban areas but I think that easy going beach bum mystique of Southern Californians is not very accurate.
 

Fairfield

Sergeant Major
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
It reminds me of a joke...

A Texas rancher and a Wisconsin farmer are talking. The Texas rancher brags, "I get up in the morning, get into my truck, and I don't reach the edge of my property until dusk."

The Wisconsin farmer says, "Yeah, I used to have a truck like that."
We tell that joke also--except it is a Vermont farmer. ☺️ Poor Texas!
 

Mark F. Jenkins

Colonel
Member of the Year
Joined
Mar 31, 2012
Location
Central Ohio
St. Louis was loaded with such deutschers. I believe the only statue to Gen. Sigel is there.

I have two family Bibles from the Kochs and Clausings-- big, old-fashioned black-letter, in German, and printed in Toledo.

I understand that one of my great-great-grandmothers had a picture of Kaiser Wilhelm II above the fireplace. When the Great War began, she threw it in the fire and demanded that no one speak German around her anymore, which I understand was not atypical of the time and place... as a result, all the German that came down to me was the occasional oath and the cooking. (Though my great-aunt still had a clear memory of the German prayer her grandfather would say before meals. She didn't know exactly what it meant, but amazingly she remembered the syllables accurately enough that I could translate it back to her. A neat little moment.)

IIRC, in the year 1830 (with two non-German exceptions), none of my mother's family were in the U.S. By 1855, they all were. I suspect the unrest in Europe in 1848 may have driven a lot of it.
 
Joined
Sep 17, 2011
Location
mo
I blame Gone with the Wind!
What is ironic is Gone with the Wind more accurately depicted the black experience then the majority of newer movies.

Also are we discussing national sentimentality or regional pride?....they aren't the same thing......every region has pride in their region, doesn't mean the the other regions romanticize it, and want to visit it because of a air of romanticism and sentimentalism
 
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Viper21

Brigadier General
Moderator
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Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Location
Rockbridge County, Virginia
Every region has people who feel attached and sentimental. Many of the reasons people list as reasons for that sentimentality could be said about the other regions just as well. There are more similarities than differences. Some regions just obsess and boast more about their own exceptionalism.
May be some truth in that.

However, I've never heard anyone locally say, "I can't wait to retire, & move to New York City". Yet, every year we get more transplants from New York, & New Jersey.
 

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
May be some truth in that.

However, I've never heard anyone locally say, "I can't wait to retire, & move to New York City". Yet, every year we get more transplants from New York, & New Jersey.
I'm not sure retirees are the best example. They just want to move somewhere warm. Old codgers that think 70 degrees feels chilly, yes they tend to move south.

If the south wants to brag about being warmer than other parts of the country, I would definitely agree with that.
 

Viper21

Brigadier General
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Location
Rockbridge County, Virginia
I'm not sure retirees are the best example. They just want to move somewhere warm. Old codgers that think 70 degrees feels chilly, yes they tend to move south.

If the south wants to brag about being warmer than other parts of the country, I would definitely agree with that.
Well that ain't the case where I live. I see single digits every winter, & get snow every year. Not to the degree folks up there do but still.

Besides, plenty of the Yankees moving to my area ain't retired. Most of the ones I've personally met, are my age, or younger. I could name at least 1/2 a dozen off the top of my head, who've moved to my area in the last 2-3 years. Keep in mind, I live in a county of less than 25,000.

Most of the folks I've talked to said, they had to get away from the craziness. I usually respond with, "Don't bring it here. Remember why you wanted to leave there...."
 

Yankee Brooke

First Sergeant
Forum Host
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Jun 8, 2018
Location
PA
May be some truth in that.

However, I've never heard anyone locally say, "I can't wait to retire, & move to New York City". Yet, every year we get more transplants from New York, & New Jersey.
No, but how many young people are itching to move to "the big city?" That city is often NYC. I've thought about moving there a few times myself, I've never actually considered moving South, for reasons I can't get into here.
 

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
Well that ain't the case where I live. I see single digits every winter, & get snow every year. Not to the degree folks up there do but still.
Besides, plenty of the Yankees moving to my area ain't retired. Most of the ones I've personally met, are my age, or younger. I could name at least 1/2 a dozen off the top of my head, who've moved to my area in the last 2-3 years. Keep in mind, I live in a county of less than 25,000.

Most of the folks I've talked to said, they had to get away from the craziness. I usually respond with, "Don't bring it here. Remember why you wanted to leave there...."
People are more mobile these days than ever before. They move around the country for all kinds of reasons. Jobs, climate, whatever. And then many move somewhere else, for the same or other reasons.

Rural agricultural areas that are far from any urban amenities such as health care, or jobs, or shopping, tend to be dying off in population. If your area is suffering from many implants, it may be because they can enjoy the amenities while avoiding the more isolated aspects.

It's regrettable that you moved there hoping that it would stay the same and then it didn't, but it happens to other places too. There was a song in the 70's that said if you call a place "paradise," then kiss it goodbye. Once people move into paradise, it's no longer a paradise.
 

Viper21

Brigadier General
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Joined
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Location
Rockbridge County, Virginia
People are more mobile these days than ever before. They move around the country for all kinds of reasons. Jobs, climate, whatever. And then many move somewhere else, for the same or other reasons.

Rural agricultural areas that are far from any urban amenities such as health care, or jobs, or shopping, tend to be dying off in population. If your area is suffering from many implants, it may be because they can enjoy the amenities while avoiding the more isolated aspects.

It's regrettable that you moved there hoping that it would stay the same and then it didn't, but it happens to other places too. There was a song in the 70's that said if you call a place "paradise," then kiss it goodbye. Once people move into paradise, it's no longer a paradise.
Yeah, there's no close conveniences where I live. It's a 30 minute drive to a half decent restaurant, a solid 75 minutes to big chain restaurant. The closest shopping mall is 1hr 15 minutes. I dig it though. Once you get used to those inconveniences, you're good. Very little crime, it's quiet, & I literally have deer in my yard daily. I see bear every year. I did finally just last week, get good internet service though...!

Fortunately, I have a little bit of land, & enjoy the heck out of it. The private road coming up to my house is about 1/4 mile or so. I haven't had a trick or treater come to my house ever...lol. I don't blame em. That would be a sketchy hike as a kid in the dark. My boys were sketched out in high school walking to the main road bus stop in the mornings...lol.

For the most part, I should be good where I actually live, for the rest of my life. The cities nearest me (Lexington, Staunton) they are a different story.
 

Fairfield

Sergeant Major
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
For the most part, I should be good where I actually live, for the rest of my life.
If we all wanted the same things, the competition would be unbearable. I too live now where I intend to stay but I live in Maine, not the south (where I come from). I like snow and cold winters and, like the late Massachusetts senator Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., I believe that the best intellectual activity occurs when the interior temperature is 60-degrees.
 

Viper21

Brigadier General
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Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Location
Rockbridge County, Virginia
If we all wanted the same things, the competition would be unbearable. I too live now where I intend to stay but I live in Maine, not the south (where I come from). I like snow and cold winters and, like the late Massachusetts senator Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., I believe that the best intellectual activity occurs when the interior temperature is 60-degrees.
Not only that, life would be pretty boring..lol.

That's awesome man. I would very much like to visit Maine (in the summer lol). On my bucket list is, a trip to Maine. On that trip, I must eat a lobster, caught that day, from a table (preferably outdoors), where I have a good view of the water, & specifically a lighthouse :cool: That's the image in my head anyways, & hope to make that happen at some point. Maine is one of 8 states I've never set foot in.

I liked the snow when I was younger, & don't mind it in small doses but, going weeks on end of below freezing daytime highs, & feet of snow... not so much anymore.

60 degrees...! Yikes..! :eek: That's a great outdoor temp but, I'd be miserable at that temp indoors. :laugh:
 

lupaglupa

1st Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
Apr 18, 2019
Location
Upstate New York
Both my parents left the South and moved north. My father returned after retirement; my mother adamantly insisted she would never live in the South again. She often referenced the book by Mississippi writer Willie Morris North Toward Home as one that fit her. She felt like New York was home. And that's how it goes - we all, if we have the luxury of choice, find our place.
 
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