Who would you quarantine with?

JKT

Private
Joined
Mar 31, 2017
Well, I'm going for the party and choose three to work toward that goal. That would be George Custer and his good bud James Washington and William B. Cushing.

Maybe Gen. W.H.C. Whiting for liquor supply and to keep B. Bragg from crashing the party.

Oh, and Don't Forget the 'Cue.

RoadDog
Okay, but I could do without Custer. Guess I’m still tainted (or jealous of) by his brash ego; humility, not one of his long suits. And I think in the post war Little Big Horn debacle, the movie Little Big Man (Dustin Hoffman) may have gotten George’s character right?
 

Zella

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
May 23, 2018
Okay, but I could do without Custer. Guess I’m still tainted (or jealous of) by his brash ego; humility, not one of his long suits. And I think in the post war Little Big Horn debacle, the movie Little Big Man (Dustin Hoffman) may have gotten George’s character right?
I strongly suspect Custer would be *that* roommate who hogged the bathroom because he was spending so much time on his hair in the mirror. :wink:
 

Adam1stVa

Corporal
Joined
Apr 6, 2020
Stonewall Jackson. Truly a self-made man. But I don't kid myself into thinking that anyone could ever really figure out just what made this man tick.
He wouldn't talk much at all. The story goes that he memorized his lectures at V. M. I. When asked a question by one of his students, he would recite the original lecture verbatim, and offer nothing else.
 

Paul Yancey

Corporal
Joined
Jan 13, 2019
Location
Kentucky
He wouldn't talk much at all. The story goes that he memorized his lectures at V. M. I. When asked a question by one of his students, he would recite the original lecture verbatim, and offer nothing else.
I had a professor like that back in college. By the end of the lecture half the class would be asleep.
 

Llewellyn

Corporal
Joined
Feb 17, 2020
Location
Britain
I had a professor like that back in college. By the end of the lecture half the class would be asleep.

Which half was the professor in ?

I had a Latin teacher who was like that - used to sit slumped at the front of the class, leaning on his desk with head in hands, eyes closed, and speaking in a terminally boring, low pitched monotone . . . . . It was catching; we were supposed to stand when a master entered and left the classroom. Although we managed it when he entered, when he left after 40 minutes it was all we could do to elevate ourselves.

Now, it isn't really right to identify individuals on the net, but as I am talking about 65 years ago and his name is material to the story I have to.

His name was Mr Bob Natrass, a gift to a bunch of smart boys, as we nicknamed him Mister Mattress.

Now, I wouldn't wish to be quarantined with him !
 

GwilymT

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Location
Pittsburgh
I think Old Warhorse Pete. Here’s a man who did his duty at the highest possible level during the war despite a lifetime of personal hardship then dedicated himself to reconciliation and equality, for which he has been tarnished by apologists. To hear the man’s experiences, thoughts and insights first hand would be immeasurable. He truly is one of the heroes of that dark time in our history. To do one’s duty as they see it and then to be able to recognize the error and work for the better good of all Americans is a sign of greatness. It’s too bad that so many today don’t recognize the error and don’t follow ol’ Pete’s lead.

After that, perhaps Chamberlain. The man had a way with words and I’m certain that conversations with a professor of rhetoric who had the experiences he did would never get old... even in quarantine.

Lastly, though not a Civil War era guy, I’d hope you would give me a pass, Mr. Foote. Who couldn’t sit and listen to him tell stories over a bourbon at sunset?
 
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Adam1stVa

Corporal
Joined
Apr 6, 2020
I think Old Warhorse Pete. Here’s a man who did his duty at the highest possible level during the war despite a lifetime of personal hardship then dedicated himself to reconciliation and equality, for which he has been tarnished by apologists. To hear the man’s experiences, thoughts and insights first hand would be immeasurable. He truly is one of the heroes of that dark time in our history. To do one’s duty as they see it and then to be able to recognize the error and work for the better good of all Americans is a sign of greatness. It’s too bad that so many today don’t recognize the error and don’t follow ol’ Pete’s lead.

After that, perhaps Chamberlain. The man had a way with words and I’m certain that conversations with a professor of rhetoric who had the experiences he did would never get old... even in quarantine.

Lastly, though not a Civil War era guy, I’d hope you would give me a pass, Mr. Foote. Who couldn’t sit and listen to him tell stories over a bourbon at sunset?
I completely agree with you about Old Pete. I'm reading his memoirs now. His honor and integrity stand out. He suffered unjustly from the post war martyrdom of Lee. I like your choice of Chamberlain too. I might also pick William Calvin Oates. Would love to read his memoirs also.
 

GwilymT

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Location
Pittsburgh
I completely agree with you about Old Pete. I'm reading his memoirs now. His honor and integrity stand out. He suffered unjustly from the post war martyrdom of Lee. I like your choice of Chamberlain too. I might also pick William Calvin Oates. Would love to read his memoirs also.

I must confess I don’t know much about Oates. Why’d you select him?
 

farmerjohn

Private
Joined
Oct 30, 2019
my gg grandfather, william gordinier. co.g, 10th michigan,along with his 3 brothers, albert,jay, and,asa [only 2 made it back to michigan]
 
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