Who was the greatest Cavalier Buford, Custer, Gregg, Stuart, Hampton, Ashby, Forrest, And Why?

Who was the Greatest cavalier of the American Civil War?

  • Buford

  • Custer

  • Gregg

  • Stuart

  • Hampton

  • Ashby

  • Forrest


Results are only viewable after voting.

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archieclement

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It's simple he did it all, want a raider, he did a successful raid of over 1500 miles in 30 some days in 1863, yet also had a sterling record of cooperating with armies and fighting vicious rear guard actions to save armies that were retreating. Alfred Pleasonton said Shelby was the best the south had, and under different conditions he would have been one of the best in the world. When your enemies even praise you, you more then likely did something...........
 

mofederal

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For the Union I like John Buford, and I have to add Jo Shelby for the Confederacy. Stuart had his times, but he also had the press. Shelby did his fighting in the Trans-Mississippi. You have to dig hard for your Civil War history out here. Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Louisiana and Texas. A far piece from the other areas of the conflict, west of the river.
 

archieclement

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I think JO supposedly was to have said upon learning of the surrender "Surrender? Neither I nor my division know the meaning of that word"
 

Eric Wittenberg

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On thinking about it, shouldn't Morgan get a vote or two? Fact is there were a lot of great ones.
There was nothing great about Morgan. Tactically, he was a disaster--he's fortunate he had his brother-in-law as the brains of his operation--and he was grossly insubordinate. His insubordination wrecked a fine division of cavalry during the Great Horse Stealing Expedition of 1863.
 

mofederal

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I think JO supposedly was to have said upon learning of the surrender "Surrender? Neither I nor my division know the meaning of that word"

One thing about Shelby he never quit or surrendered. He just kept going, buried his flag in the Rio Grande and just went on. He usually fought against higher odds and prevailed. There are all kinds of victory, survival is the highest of all.
 

1NCCAV

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There was nothing great about Morgan. Tactically, he was a disaster--he's fortunate he had his brother-in-law as the brains of his operation--and he was grossly insubordinate. His insubordination wrecked a fine division of cavalry during the Great Horse Stealing Expedition of 1863.
Hey, he contributed some good horse soldiers to the frontier Indian fighting army. Morgan's men were well represented among the Galvanized Yankees. Can't blame some of them for wanting to escape dysentery and scurvy. Especially if they figured the war was lost and they had nothing to go back to.
 

1NCCAV

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One thing about Shelby he never quit or surrendered.
He was not an unreconstructed rebel forever. He returned from Mexico after two years and was later a United States Marshal. At one point in his post ACW career he was asked about states rights and replied that the issue had been settled.
 

mofederal

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True enough about Shelby. Despite his actions in the past, he later resumed being a Missourian and American again. He was a member of UCV or at least influential in state affairs. When researching at Western Manuscripts in Columbia, I ran into a lot of papers signed by him nominating Missouri Confederate Guerrillas to be honored. Oddly enough Shelby witnessed the St. Louis Riot in May of 1861. he later expressed a deep regret for his actions in the border War in Kansas. He also appointed a African American to be Deputy US Marshall under him and said he had made the right choice and he stood by it.
 

1NCCAV

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Morgan's men were well represented among the Galvanized Yankees.
A little more on Morgan's men and the Galvanized Yankees:

About 60 of Morgan's men were recruited. They made up the bulk of K Company, 11th Ohio Cavalry and served at Ft. Kearny and Ft. Laramie in 1865 and 1866. They were in quite a few engagements during the Powder River Expedition of 1865. None of Morgan's men were part of the Volunteer Infantry Regiments as far as I know.
 


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