Who was Lee’s Greatest Influence

American87

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Grant’s siege of Vicksburg was patterned after Scott in Mexico. Also Grant’s terms of surrender at Appomattox were influenced by Scott.

How do you think Grant's Vicksburg campaign was modeled after Scott? Scott never detached from his line of communications or used river transports, and Grant never outflanked any Confederate armies like Scott did at Cerro Gordo, if I remember correctly.
 

8thFlorida

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How do you think Grant's Vicksburg campaign was modeled after Scott? Scott never detached from his line of communications or used river transports, and Grant never outflanked any Confederate armies like Scott did at Cerro Gordo, if I remember correctly.
I’ve read this in a few places but here is one: from ABT
Washington on May 4, 1863: "As soon as Sherman comes up and the rations on the way arrive, he [Grant] will disregard his base and depend upon the country for meat and even for bread." In 1867 Adam Badeau, a former Grant staff officer, published the first volume of his three-volume Military History of General U. S. Grant. Badeau wrote that, "[Grant] at once decided to abandon his base altogether, to plunge into the enemy's country with three days rations, trusting to the region itself for forage and supplies." A year later, in The Personal History of U. S. Grant, Albert Richardson compared Grant's Vicksburg Campaign with "Scott's brilliant campaign from Puebla to Mexico," and wrote that Grant "determined to abandon his base."
 

American87

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I’ve read this in a few places but here is one: from ABT
Washington on May 4, 1863: "As soon as Sherman comes up and the rations on the way arrive, he [Grant] will disregard his base and depend upon the country for meat and even for bread." In 1867 Adam Badeau, a former Grant staff officer, published the first volume of his three-volume Military History of General U. S. Grant. Badeau wrote that, "[Grant] at once decided to abandon his base altogether, to plunge into the enemy's country with three days rations, trusting to the region itself for forage and supplies." A year later, in The Personal History of U. S. Grant, Albert Richardson compared Grant's Vicksburg Campaign with "Scott's brilliant campaign from Puebla to Mexico," and wrote that Grant "determined to abandon his base."

Thank you for the sources, it is much appreciated. But why specifically was Grant's Vicksburg Campaign compared to Scott's Campaign in Mexico? I don't recall Scott ever departing from his line of communications, but I may be misremembering there.
 

8thFlorida

First Sergeant
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Thank you for the sources, it is much appreciated. But why specifically was Grant's Vicksburg Campaign compared to Scott's Campaign in Mexico? I don't recall Scott ever departing from his line of communications, but I may be misremembering there.
The strategy in Vicksburg worked when Grant abandoned the full frontal attack. A display of force in the expected direction of attack only. This was the strategy used in Mexico during sieges. Patterned after Napoleon.
 

American87

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The strategy in Vicksburg worked when Grant abandoned the full frontal attack. A display of force in the expected direction of attack only. This was the strategy used in Mexico during sieges. Patterned after Napoleon.

Isn't that called a "feint," when you show force in one direction, but then attack another?

That hardly seems like it can be traced directly through Scott to Napoleon. It seems like a common tactic employed in all ages, imo.
 
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