Who Here At CWT Shouldn't Be? " There But For The Grace.... Go I "

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#21
View attachment 290739
Brandy Station, Harper's Weekly. Between Brandy, Aldie, Fairfield and a few more bloodbaths, really should not BE here. Gene pool could have ended during any of them. Great great grandparent somehow escaped the war's burial trenches- 600,000 plus didn't. Two others emerged if not unscathed at least able to marry and add blossoms to the family tree. Really, we just shouldn't BE here.

Not narrow escapes although they'd be welcome. Occurs to me frequently how many of us nearly missed being born by virtue of gene pools marching off to this war. It's not a genuine ' What If ' wondering how many members CWT would count 150 years later had a soldier not been with Picket's men July 3rd, 1863 or part of those endless waves Grant threw against Confederate troops at Cold Harbor. Phantom members sometimes feel a little real, thinking of those who never came home 150 years ago.

Really, how many of us are only here because a forever unknown marksmen missed, or wounded instead of killed, or something enabled them to escape ( or survive ) typhoid, cholera, measles, pneumonia. Examples, had three reasons I wouldn't be writing this, that all 3 great great grandfathers in uniform emerged from the war is a flaming miracle. 6th US Cavalry, 50th PA, 126th OVI- last two were at Spotsylvania, wounded within a day of each other. Gives me chills.

Ever think about that? That but for really, God's grace, luck, quick thinking and plain, old happenstance- well, wouldn't be here.
I couldn't agree more!
 

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#23
My wife's great-great grandfather, Thomas Alexander Mercer, served in the 17th Alabama. He survived the Atlanta Campaign, the Battle of Franklin and the Battle of Nashville, where he was captured and sent to Camp Douglas until the end of the war. He lived to bring his extended family to Texas where he prospered and blessed me with his great-great grand daughter.
 
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#24
My great-great grandfather, Thomas Ingenhuett, a German Texan, fled his home in Comfort, Texas, to join the Union Army. He served as a 1st Sergeant in the 1st Texas Volunteer Cavalry, U.S. While part of an expedition that occupied the lower Rio Grande valley, his company was attacked by overwhelming numbers at the Rancho Las Rucias. Driven from the rancho, he helped cover his men's retreat to the Rio Grande, where some tried to swim the river: the rest surrendered. He made it across but collapsed and was tended by friendly Mexicans. When almost recovered and preparing to return to his regiment, he was stabbed in the back by a "Texas renegade" and nearly died. By the time he recovered, the Union Army had left Texas and returned to New Orleans. Months later he was finally able rejoin his regiment, which had listed him as a deserter. Returning to Comfort he became a pillar of the little community and was responsible for founding the town's first brewery. How's that for a happy ending!
 

Story

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#25
Great Great Grandfather, Co E 1st SC (Orr's) enlisted 20 March 1862 and passed away (died from disease) on 4 Jan 1863 in Winchester Hospital (Guinea Station), VA.
@ 30 years old when he drew his last breath.
Left a 3 year old son as his only offspring, who had nine children - one of whom was my grandfather.
 
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alan polk

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#26
View attachment 290739
Brandy Station, Harper's Weekly. Between Brandy, Aldie, Fairfield and a few more bloodbaths, really should not BE here. Gene pool could have ended during any of them. Great great grandparent somehow escaped the war's burial trenches- 600,000 plus didn't. Two others emerged if not unscathed at least able to marry and add blossoms to the family tree. Really, we just shouldn't BE here.

Not narrow escapes although they'd be welcome. Occurs to me frequently how many of us nearly missed being born by virtue of gene pools marching off to this war. It's not a genuine ' What If ' wondering how many members CWT would count 150 years later had a soldier not been with Picket's men July 3rd, 1863 or part of those endless waves Grant threw against Confederate troops at Cold Harbor. Phantom members sometimes feel a little real, thinking of those who never came home 150 years ago.

Really, how many of us are only here because a forever unknown marksmen missed, or wounded instead of killed, or something enabled them to escape ( or survive ) typhoid, cholera, measles, pneumonia. Examples, had three reasons I wouldn't be writing this, that all 3 great great grandfathers in uniform emerged from the war is a flaming miracle. 6th US Cavalry, 50th PA, 126th OVI- last two were at Spotsylvania, wounded within a day of each other. Gives me chills.

Ever think about that? That but for really, God's grace, luck, quick thinking and plain, old happenstance- well, wouldn't be here.
Interesting thread as usual JPK.

I think about it too but from a different angle sometimes. I often ponder over those people - thousands and thousands of them, those generations of souls who never came into existence. Folks I might have come to know, might have roomed in college with, met at a family reunion, worked with; or, perhaps, souls I might have actually argued with on this very Civil War Talk. Not to be.

All that potential existence waiting for expression, just as we were waiting.

Merely apparent, relying on that host who was shouldering his musket before advancing across that field. I think about them sometimes - These ghosts of sorts who, unlike us, never made it simply because their host did not make it across that field. Yet they had the same potential to become flesh and blood and to multiply and be measured by the linking of generations. What could have been, instead, was snuffed out by some minnie ball, some shell fragment or some devious pathogen or germ 160 years ago.

We became, they did not. And that’s weird.
 

JPK Huson 1863

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#27
Well whew. Thought the question would be answered with crickets, you know? " Oh look, JPK finally lost the rest of her mind ". That.

Read these in a continual state of chills- underlines that ' thing ', esoteric as it may be, seems important. @diane, you'd be the most unlikely collection of genes to be here, gee whiz, hadn't thought of who survived long enough to reproduce. Or get to the war. THEN considering those gazillion lost to disease from the time the first European sneezed on this continent ( throwing in Pizarro's germy pigs ), makes the odds more massive.

Now seems a greater fluke, when our Revolution comes into it ( thank you, hadn't gone that far ). TWO Civil War grgrgreats were grandsons of Revolutionary soldiers. Another direct, heck, was at Culloden so the whole concept makes us being here unlikely.

Mule Shoe, unscathed? Just wow.
 

Story

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#29
Merely apparent, relying on that host who was shouldering his musket before advancing across that field. I think about them sometimes - These ghosts of sorts who, unlike us, never made it simply because their host did not make it across that field. Yet they had the same potential to become flesh and blood and to multiply and be measured by the linking of generations. What could have been, instead, was snuffed out by some minnie ball, some shell fragment or some devious pathogen or germ 160 years ago.
Ever see this?

Grim joke: bunch of guys in a bar, talking about the 'two most terrifying words you can hear".

Finally, the old guy in the corner softly chimes in.

'Fix - Bayonets'.
 
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#30
Yes, Annie, as you know from reading my book, I have "thought about that, but for the grace of God, I would not have been born. My twice-great grandfather's regiment, the 27th Alabama Infantry, was virtually destroyed again and again, and those handful of men from three to seven other regiments joined to what became known as the Consolidated Regiment. Oh, and my great grandfather his son was just a toddler in the wilderness when the War hit, his family pillaged, and his father conscripted. Again, but for the grace of God, the lad did not starve or succumb to accident or disease. Post War, he did not fare much better, when a jealous man went gunning for him wild-west style. Again he was saved from death, by his brother's quick draw. The whole lot of them, three brothers and a father, founded churches and became gospel ministers post war. It is a rare miracle, my life. :angel:
 

Podad

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#32
I am among our members who fit this description. Here is a link to a sort of similar thread I did a while back. https://civilwartalk.com/threads/i-may-owe-my-existence-to-gen-dan-sickles.124424/#post-1328812

I descend directly from 6 Confederate veterans. 3 of these did not father the children I descended from until after the war. The grace of God saw them through
Fast forward 80 years and my father is in the middle of hell in the South Pacific during WW2. He didn’t get a scratch. I was born 10 years later.

Great thread!!!!!
 

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