Who has Unionist guerrilla ancestors?


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#2
I have a connection to Fritz Teneger's outfit...
Pretty sure their actions and the following incident on the Nueces qualifies, wouldn't you say?

These men were not bloodthirsty savages, they were 'Freidenkers'... but no matter how enlightened they were - they were not above the occasional small-scale sabotage, periodic stage/supply interference, or a good old fashioned intimidation tactic.

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(Image Source: http://m.chron.com/news/houston-tex...-event-to-recall-conflicted-Texas-3776975.php)

(Edited to expand upon the subject and correct grammar and punctuation.)
 
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#3
I have a connection to Fritz Tegener's outfit...
Pretty sure their actions and the following incident on the Nueces qualifies, wouldn't you say?

They weren't 'bloodthirsty savages' - but they weren't above the occasional sabotage, stage/supply interference, and intimidation tactic.

View attachment 103777

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(Image Source: http://m.chron.com/news/houston-tex...-event-to-recall-conflicted-Texas-3776975.php)
I just read the link. I am not aware of the Neueces massacre victims being guerrillas but rather young men fleeing Confederate conscription. I could be wrong so feel free to correct me if I am.
Not to say their weren't Unionist guerrillas in Texas .
Leftyhunter
 
#4
I just read the link. I am not aware of the Neueces massacre victims being guerrillas but rather young men fleeing Confederate conscription. I could be wrong so feel free to correct me if I am.
Not to say their weren't Unionist guerrillas in Texas .
Leftyhunter
That is the (infuriatingly) popular belief.

If you're wanting a Union-sympathetic equivalent of Anderson, Quantrill, etc... I suppose that you are in for a disappointment.

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To answer your query in a very abbreviated manner - merely stating that the German Unionists were 'avoiding conscription' does a great injustice as it omits a ton of great history.

Were you aware that alot of the German Unionists were formed into militia companies?

They were deemed by the local confederate forces to be waging an active rebellion - and there are an ample number of instances that support the fact that the small band of men in (Major!) Fritz Teneger's party were being hunted down as instigators and insurgents, not just conscription dodgers.

Getting out of the region was the main focus - eventually linking up with a Federal formation was an afterthought for a few.

The Texas Hill Country is relatively rife with instances of bushwhacker atrocities committed by both sides.

If you are interested in expanding your understanding of this chapter of Texas/Civil War history, I'd highly recommend starting with this title - It is EXCELLENT.

image.jpeg
 
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#5
Has we know we now have a major motion picture Jones County about Unionist guerrillas I know @Allie has some Unionist guerrillas in her family tree from Jones County Mississippi no less! Anyone else? If you have Confederate guerrillas in the family tree that's good but they deserve their own thread.
Leftyhunter
These relatives of mine probably wouldn't be considered Unionist guerrillas, but as Federals late in the war, they fought Confederate guerrillas. One in particular, was in the 3rd Tennessee Mounted Infantry. Even Unionists referred to them as a "well organized outlaw band".

http://civilwartalk.com/threads/why...ight-for-the-union.118253/page-9#post-1217789
 
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#6
Mine aren't ancestors but cousins of my Landrum branch. A Confederate communication mentions "Captain Landrum" from Jones county, who was one of the leaders of a raid on Augusta.

From the comments section of renegade south:

On March 8, 1864, Captain A.F. Ramsey of Company A, Third Mississippi Volunteers, wrote to Major J.C. Denis, the following letter: “I have been stationed at Augusta, Perry Co., Miss. for the last six months & beg to make the following statement of the condition of affairs in that region. About the 21st of Feb. last – the deserters in Jones & Perry counties, to the number of about fifty, under one Edwards of Perry County, and one Landrum of Jones County – calling themselves Captains, came to Augusta. They captured one Lieut. and two Sergeants, belonging to the forces stationed there – they paroled them giving them regular Yankee parolles (sic.) signed by Edwards – They took nine horses belonging to the soldiers and two belonging to citizens – together with all the Govt. stores, cooking utensils, bedding, etc. Three Sergeants in making their escape, were fired upon and one of them slightly wounded. They stated they were in regular communication with the Yankees, were fighting for the Union, and would have peace or hell by August. They told the negroes they were free. They captured Capt. Bradford at Salem about the 24th of Feby. and were about to hang him, but after the urgent solicitations of himself and several prominent citizens they consented to take the vote when it was decided by nine to eleven not to hang him – he promising to quit the conscript service.”
Ramsey’s report is confirmed by a letter written 29 March 1864 by Captain Wirt Thompson of Company A 24th Mississippi Regiment, to James Sedon, The Secretary of War for the Confederate States of America.
No one is quite certain which brother exactly Captain Landrum was, but there was only one family Landrum in Jones, and they were known Unionists - after Col. Maury swept through clearing out guerrillas and deserters, two of them went to Louisiana and joined the Union army, and one named his son Ulysses Sherman Landrum. Another member of the family put in a Southern Claims Commission claim, in which it was noted that "all the Landrums are known Unionists."

Rudy Leverett, in "Legend of the Free State of Jones," is of the opinion that the Edwards / Landrum band was entirely separate from that of Newt Knight and operated with a different m.o. Leverett is not very charitably inclined towards Knight in general, believing him to be primarily a criminal who masked his activity by pretending to be a Unionist. He is of the opinion that the Edwards / Landrum band, operating in a different part of Jones, were actual Unionists, and that their exploits, not Knight's, led to part of the legend behind the Free State of Jones which was co-opted by Knight later. Victoria Bynum of course has a quite different view of Knight. I'm not entirely following her evidence trail, however.
 
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Bruce Vail

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#7
I imagine there must be some Cherokee tribal association linked to the pro-Union factions of the tribe...
 
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#8
That is the (infuriatingly) popular belief.

If you're wanting a Union-sympathetic equivalent of Anderson, Quantrill, etc... I suppose that you are in for a disappointment.

View attachment 103784

To answer your query in a very abbreviated manner - merely stating that the German Unionists were 'avoiding conscription' does a great injustice as it omits a ton of great history.

Were you aware that alot of the German Unionists were formed into militia companies?

They were deemed by the local confederate forces to be waging an active rebellion - and there are an ample number of instances that support the fact that the small band of men in (Major!) Fritz Teneger's party were being hunted down as instigators and insurgents, not just conscription dodgers.

Getting out of the region was the main focus - eventually linking up with a Federal formation was an afterthought for a few.

The Texas Hill Country is relatively rife with instances of bushwhacker atrocities committed by both sides.

If you are interested in expanding your understanding of this chapter of Texas/Civil War history, I'd highly recommend starting with this title - It is EXCELLENT.

View attachment 103793
I wasn't altogether wrong . The original goal of the sixty Hill Country German immigrants who wished to join the Union Army by escaping their way into Mexico and then taking a boat to New Orleans was to join the Union Army. After the massacre..
"The remaining Germans escaped, but back in the hill country, reprisals continued for several months after the "Nuceces Massacre". Guerrilla war broke out in earnest. The Germans called rebel guerrillas ...
"The hill country remained unsettled until the end of the war but an unusually accommodating policy towards the Germans bought relative calm by the spring of 1863. District military commander General John B. Magruder, after imposing martial law, convinced some German to accept conscription by allowing draftees to work as teamsters or to serve on the frontier against the Indians. He also granted a generous number of exemptions to German farmers so the might make their land productive"
"A Savage Conflict the decisive role of guerrillas in the American Civil War Daniel Sutherland University of North Carolina Press p.143.
So we are both right. It was not the original intention of the hill country Germans to become guerrillas but they ended up doing so or at least some did. Your ancestors had a lot of guts to become Unionist guerrillas since it was a classic case of " no quarter given no quarter taken"
Leftyhunter
 
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#9
Mine aren't ancestors but cousins of my Landrum branch. A Confederate communication mentions "Captain Landrum" from Jones county, who was one of the leaders of a raid on Augusta.

From the comments section of renegade south:



No one is quite certain which brother exactly Captain Landrum was, but there was only one family Landrum in Jones, and they were known Unionists - after Col. Maury swept through clearing out guerrillas and deserters, two of them went to Louisiana and joined the Union army, and one named his son Ulysses Sherman Landrum. Another member of the family put in a Southern Claims Commission claim, in which it was noted that "all the Landrums are known Unionists."

Rudy Leverett, in "Legend of the Free State of Jones," is of the opinion that the Edwards / Landrum band was entirely separate from that of Newt Knight and operated with a different m.o. Leverett is not very charitably inclined towards Knight in general, believing him to be primarily a criminal who masked his activity by pretending to be a Unionist. He is of the opinion that the Edwards / Landrum band, operating in a different part of Jones, were actual Unionists, and that their exploits, not Knight's, led to part of the legend behind the Free State of Jones which was co-opted by Knight later. Victoria Bynum of course has a quite different view of Knight. I'm not entirely following her evidence trail, however.
Yes i also think Thomas S Landrum was the Capt. that was in the report of Captain A.F. Ramsey of Company A.
A lot of my kin were part of the 1st New Orleans from Jones and Wayne county Mississippi. Landrum, Pitt’, Walters,Show’s, just to name a few. i believe Thomas S Landrum was the Captian of The Republic of Jones who was talked about in a report and that he took people with him to fort pike from the swamp to join the Union Army and sold 3 mules to them $450.00 per Southern Claims Commission claim J E Wilborn said would have been executed if it was not for his friends talking about Thomas S Landrum in the Southern Claims Commission claim file . He was my 5th great-uncle.
my line is from his brother Linson B Landrum who died in New Orleans before he could join the 1st his wife was Elizabeth Ann Pitts a sister to Daniel Pitts Jr ,Nancy Elizabeth Pitts who married Hanson Andrew Walters and then Marada M Walters who both were in the 1st New Orleans.William Norvel Pitts,
there is more than just Newton Knight story in jones and wayne co mississippi. and yes i have pitt in my line who married into the Knight family. Daniel Pitts Jr married Serena Margaret Knight he was in the 1st Regiment, New Orleans Infantry, Louisiana her father was William Henry “Pap” Knight. i have William Norvel Pitts married Mary Ann Knight he was a Conscript from Jones co in to the 8th Alabama Regiment her father was Jefferson Jesse Davis Knight. they both on the pitts side are my 5th great-uncle so if you look deep into it you will find that most of the family of the 1st New Orleans are kin in some way. i have been looking into it for a long time because of my roots.
 
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#10
Yes i also think Thomas S Landrum was the Capt. that was in the report of Captain A.F. Ramsey of Company A.
A lot of my kin were part of the 1st New Orleans from Jones and Wayne county Mississippi. Landrum, Pitt’, Walters,Show’s, just to name a few. i believe Thomas S Landrum was the Captian of The Republic of Jones who was talked about in a report and that he took people with him to fort pike from the swamp to join the Union Army and sold 3 mules to them $450.00 per Southern Claims Commission claim J E Wilborn said would have been executed if it was not for his friends talking about Thomas S Landrum in the Southern Claims Commission claim file . He was my 5th great-uncle.
my line is from his brother Linson B Landrum who died in New Orleans before he could join the 1st his wife was Elizabeth Ann Pitts a sister to Daniel Pitts Jr ,Nancy Elizabeth Pitts who married Hanson Andrew Walters and then Marada M Walters who both were in the 1st New Orleans.William Norvel Pitts,
there is more than just Newton Knight story in jones and wayne co mississippi. and yes i have pitt in my line who married into the Knight family. Daniel Pitts Jr married Serena Margaret Knight he was in the 1st Regiment, New Orleans Infantry, Louisiana her father was William Henry “Pap” Knight. i have William Norvel Pitts married Mary Ann Knight he was a Conscript from Jones co in to the 8th Alabama Regiment her father was Jefferson Jesse Davis Knight. they both on the pitts side are my 5th great-uncle so if you look deep into it you will find that most of the family of the 1st New Orleans are kin in some way. i have been looking into it for a long time because of my roots.
Well hello cousin! I have several DNA matches to descendants of Linson on Ancestry. Our common ancestors are John D Landrum and Mary Chew Buckner. My Civil War era Landrum ancestor was Confederate Physician Dr. William Thomas Landrum from Oglethorpe co, Georgia. One of the things I find fun about researching the Landrums is that there were family members on both sides of the war, doing almost everything - there's even a Union General, William Jennings Landram, who is also a cousin of ours. Welcome to the forum.
 

1NCCAV

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#11
3rd North Carolina Mounted Infantry, I believe, but I'm not certain. Not direct ancestors though. I'd be a collateral descendant.
 
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#12
3rd North Carolina Mounted Infantry, I believe, but I'm not certain. Not direct ancestors though. I'd be a collateral descendant.
I don't know if Kirks Raiders counts.As long as the 3rd North Carolina Regiment is in uniform they are not guerrillas plus they get paid and are eligible for a pension. By definition guerrillas are non uniformed, unpaid and not subject to the rules and regulations of the armed forces. They did from time to time receive military and logistical support as I posted in my thread " Union vs CSA guerrillas".
Leftyhunter
 
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#14
Mr 3rd G Grandfather was Thomas Landrum, 2nd GGrandfather was William Henry Landrum. There were from Jones Co MS. Landrums in Gray &Blue
 
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#15
Has we know we now have a major motion picture Jones County about Unionist guerrillas I know @Allie has some Unionist guerrillas in her family tree from Jones County Mississippi no less! Anyone else? If you have Confederate guerrillas in the family tree that's good but they deserve their own thread.
Leftyhunter
My 2nd and 3 G Grandfathers were Thomas and William Henry Landrum they were Confederate with Jones County but never wanted any part of it, They became Union in LA
 
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#16
Well hello cousin! I have several DNA matches to descendants of Linson on Ancestry. Our common ancestors are John D Landrum and Mary Chew Buckner. My Civil War era Landrum ancestor was Confederate Physician Dr. William Thomas Landrum from Oglethorpe co, Georgia. One of the things I find fun about researching the Landrums is that there were family members on both sides of the war, doing almost everything - there's even a Union General, William Jennings Landram, who is also a cousin of ours. Welcome to the forum.
My 2nd G Grandfather was William Henry Landrum son of 3rd G Grandfather Thomas S Landrum, hello new cuz
 
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#17
Mine aren't ancestors but cousins of my Landrum branch. A Confederate communication mentions "Captain Landrum" from Jones county, who was one of the leaders of a raid on Augusta.

From the comments section of renegade south:



No one is quite certain which brother exactly Captain Landrum was, but there was only one family Landrum in Jones, and they were known Unionists - after Col. Maury swept through clearing out guerrillas and deserters, two of them went to Louisiana and joined the Union army, and one named his son Ulysses Sherman Landrum. Another member of the family put in a Southern Claims Commission claim, in which it was noted that "all the Landrums are known Unionists."

Rudy Leverett, in "Legend of the Free State of Jones," is of the opinion that the Edwards / Landrum band was entirely separate from that of Newt Knight and operated with a different m.o. Leverett is not very charitably inclined towards Knight in general, believing him to be primarily a criminal who masked his activity by pretending to be a Unionist. He is of the opinion that the Edwards / Landrum band, operating in a different part of Jones, were actual Unionists, and that their exploits, not Knight's, led to part of the legend behind the Free State of Jones which was co-opted by Knight later. Victoria Bynum of course has a quite different view of Knight. I'm not entirely following her evidence trail, however.
Capt Landrum was my 3rd GGrandfather Thomas S Landrum

HENRY MARSHALL LANDRUM SR:
Thomas S. Landrum (ca 1818 – 1898)
Henry Landrum (1846 – 1923)
James Johnson Landrum (1820 – 1886)
William Henry Landrum (1844 – 1918)
Linson B. Landrum (ca 1823 – 1865)
Henry Marshall Landrum Jr (1827 – 1900)
Samuel L. Landrum (ca 1834 – 1910)
William Pinkney Landrum (ca 1836 – 1890)
Elijah Landrum (ca 1838 – bef 1866)​
JESSE MARION LANDRUM SR:
Wiley H. Landrum (ca 1828 – ca 1883)
Charles Landrum (ca 1831 – 1857)
Lewis L. Landrum (1836 – 1910)
William Manuel Landrum (1839 – 1914)
John Landrum (ca 1846 – 1865)
Jesse Marion Landrum Jr (ca 1850 – 1930)​
Capt A. F. Ramsey of the Confederate 3rd MS wrote a letter on 8 March 1864 to the provost general of Alabama, Mississippi, and Eastern Louisiana lamenting the state of affairs he found while stationed in Perry County (south of Jones County). He cited two bands of deserters, one led by a man named Edwards and another by a Landrum. Could the “Captain Landrum” Ramsey mentioned have been Thomas S. Landrum?
 
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#18
Has we know we now have a major motion picture Jones County about Unionist guerrillas I know @Allie has some Unionist guerrillas in her family tree from Jones County Mississippi no less! Anyone else? If you have Confederate guerrillas in the family tree that's good but they deserve their own thread.
Leftyhunter
Yes, my Landrums are Thomas S and William Henry Landrum, 2nd and 3rd G Grandfathers.
I was able to confirm family stories when I read Landrums in Gray & Blue Conflicts in Loyalities in Piney Woods Mississippi.

The names of four Landrum men appear on the rolls for that day: Thomas S. Landrum, who gave his age as 43; William P. Landrum, age 28; Henry Landrum, age 18; and John Landrum, age 19. As related in Part 1, Thomas and William Pinkney Landrum were brothers and had enlisted together in the Confederate 2nd Battalion AL Light Artillery in February 1862. They deserted in October following the Battle of Iuka. Henry was the eldest son of Thomas while John was a first cousin (son of Jesse Marion Landrum). Only Thomas could sign his name; the other three made their marks on the enlistment form.
 
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#19
I have a 1st cousin of my 4th Great Grandfather William Campbell who was a Captain in the 60th Illinois Infantry. He was named Joseph Campbell and his family had moved to Texas and when the Civil War broke out he joined a independent cavalry company under Martin D. Hart. The unit used partisan tactics and mostly operated in Arkansas and Missouri but they came back to Texas every once and a while and on one trip back in March 1863 Joseph Campbell and a few others were caught and hung and his mother had to cut him down. Captain Hart was captured in January that year and hung also. Joseph also had a brother named Armistead who also died in the Civil War and as I can't find him in any of the "regular" Union or Confederate forces he may have been a partisan fighter also. I got a lot of this info from the book "Brush Men and Vigilantes: Civil War Dissent in Texas." and also from http://www.texasmilitaryforcesmuseum.org/tnghist11.htm and https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fhace

I believe there may have been others in Missouri also I will check.
 
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#20
OK I checked and I found a couple people who were in Union militia units. They were also related to the Campbells I mentioned in my earlier post through marriage as my 4th Great grandfather Capt. William Campbell married my 4th Great grandmother Rachel Garrison. They are her cousins. One was named Isaac Newton Atterberry and he was in the 11th Missouri State Militia Regiment (Union). His son was Isaac Taylor Atterberry and he was in the 7th Missouri Cavalry (Union) and the 1st Missouri Cavalry (Union). Issac N. also had a brother Zephaniah Murry Atterberry who was in the 70th Enrolled Missouri Militia (Union) and confusingly he also had a nephew named Zephaniah Murry Atterberry, who was the son of Seamon Atterberry, who was a Musician in the 10th Missouri Infantry (Union). His brother Lewis actually had a bio entry. The following was taken from the 1910 History of Macon County, Missouri

Mr. Atterbury was born on the farm where the town of Atlanta, Macon county, Mo., is now situated, on the 12th of May, 1845. His father, Seaman Atterbury, a native of Kentucky, moved with his parents when a child of eight years, to Illinois, and passed his early life near Galesburg. At the age of 18 the family removed to Monroe county, Mo., where he formed the acquaintance of a charming young lady by the name of Nancy G. Weatherford, of Kentucky, to whom he was married. After living there several years he moved to Iowa, settling in Davis county, near the present site of the town of Bloomfield, where he lived six years.

Not satisfied, he returned with his family to Missouri in 1845, and bought land and improved a farm in Macon county, and there he still lives. He lost his first wife in 1852, and subsequently married Miss Mary C. Dabney, also from Kentucky. By the first marriage there were seven children: two girls and five boys; of these L. J. was the fifth child, all now married. There were three boys by his deceased wife, there being 10 children. All are living; the youngest is 25 years old. L. J. grew up in the county on a farm, and was educated partly at the common schools and partly by himself.

When the war began he was but a boy of 16, but enlisted in the service of the stars and stripes in the Twenty-second Missouri infantry, afterwards consolidated with and known as the Tenth Missouri infantry, under the brave Col. Samuel A. Molmes, of St. Louis. He served until 1864, part of the time as musician. He was in many fights the principal of which are Iuka and Corinth, Miss., Yazoo Pass Expedition, Siege of Vicksburg, Raymond, Port Gibson, Jackson, Champion's Hill, Chattanooga, Mission Ridge and Stony Point, Tenn., this being his last general engagement of any consequence. At Corinth he received a slight gunshot wound in the hip, but served his country until his term of service expired, and then was discharged and went home. The war not being over, he remained home two months, and re-enlisted in an independent company for scouting purposes, in which he was quartermaster sergeant.

When the war was over he clerked for his father in a store in Atlanta, but in little more than a year went on a farm. His next step, farming being a lonely life for a bachelor, was to choose a wife, whom he found in the person of Miss Julia A., daughter of Judge M.G. Clem, of Adair county, but formerly from Ohio. After his marriage Mr. Atterbury continued to farm for 14 years, devoting some time, also to the raising and feeding of stock for general markets. In September, 1881, he moved to Atlanta, sold his farm, and engaged in the drug and grocery business. He has since sold out his business and is living at ease. Mr. and Mrs. A. have one child, M. Theron, one, Eddie, having died in infancy. Mr. A. is a member of Atlanta Lodge No. 411, I. O. O. F., and is vice-grand of the order. Mrs. A. belongs to the M. E. Church.

I suspect there are more from this family and need to do more research.
 



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