White Immigrants Needed to Replace the Dying Black Race Alabama January 1869


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John Hartwell

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#3
There were a number of attempts in the postwar South to attract white immigrants. This is the first I have heard of replacements for a supposedly "dying-off" black population. I have read of an attempt to overcome the effect of black votes by attracting white immigrants from both within and without the US.

The Charleston Daily News of Nov. 26, 1868, editorialized, more reasonably:
hjg.jpg


In a little different vein, I also note the the same issue, this curiosity:
cdn26n68.jpg

The solid, respectable description: "simple merchandise, to be sold for freight and charges" must have been refreshing, if not comforting to the unwillingly retired ex-slave merchant.

One wonders what became of those poor people.
 

John Hartwell

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#4
I just discovered the following in the Alexandria Gazette of 4 Nov, 1868:
AlexGzt4D68.jpg


Although this shipment of "simple merchandise" into Galveston does appear to be a hoax, by 1870 there were reportedly about 2000 Chinese coolies laboring in the Southern states. Arrived by somewhat less distressful means, some of these laborers were contracted directly from China, but most seem to have been hired in California. There were also a number of Chinese in Texas described as having "escaped from coolie servitude in Cuba."
 

Pat Young

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#6
There were a number of attempts in the postwar South to attract white immigrants. This is the first I have heard of replacements for a supposedly "dying-off" black population. I have read of an attempt to overcome the effect of black votes by attracting white immigrants from both within and without the US.

The Charleston Daily News of Nov. 26, 1868, editorialized, more reasonably:
View attachment 216212

In a little different vein, I also note the the same issue, this curiosity:
View attachment 216213
The solid, respectable description: "simple merchandise, to be sold for freight and charges" must have been refreshing, if not comforting to the unwillingly retired ex-slave merchant.

One wonders what became of those poor people.
Thanks for adding that John.
 



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