While Eleanor's Away, Some Longstreet Each Day

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Another drawing of James Longstreet I never saw before, this time from Harper's Weekly, July 9 1864:
Snip-it_1554050802498.jpg

There was an article about our General, from which I have copied this:
"He is in the habit of exposing himself in a careless manner, and it was perhaps in this way that he got his wound in one of the battles in the Wilderness. At Gettysburg he is said to have led a Georgian regiment in a charge against a battery, hat in hand, and in front of every body. A few hours later a Colonel found him seated on the top of a snake fence at the edge of the wood, and looking perfectly calm and unperturbed, while some of his troops passed by. The gallant Colonel, who scarcely knew what had been the result of the battle, observed to General LONGSTREET, "I wouldn't have missed this for anything." LONGSTREET replied, laughing, "The devil you wouldn't! I should liked to have missed it very much; we've attacked, and been repulsed; look there!"
http://www.sonofthesouth.net/leefoundation/civil-war/1864/july/general-longstreet.htm
 

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James N.

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View attachment 318790

General James Longstreet oil painting by Robert Lindneux, 1942.

Picture from here.
That's NOT supposed to be Longstreet! Note especially the Indians in the background; what're THEY doing there? And why does he have grey hair? It's because this is a representation (and a hokey one at that) of Brig. Gen. Albert Pike of Arkansas, a huge man who weighed in at almost 300 pounds, a noted Fort Smith lawyer who was involved with various tribes - but not Plains tribes like illustrated! - in Indian Territory, and was appointed Commissioner to them in 1861 by the Confederate Government. He was also made a brigadier general to command the brigade of Creek (Muscogee) and Cherokee volunteers and led them (poorly) at the Battle of Pea Ridge/Elkhorn Tavern in May, 1862, following which he was replaced by Brig. Gen. Douglas H. Cooper. Pike is best known, however, as the author of the "bible" on Masonic rituals and dogma written in the 1870's and I believe followed to this day. There are to my knowledge no wartime photos of Pike, but here are a couple showing him both pre- and postwar wearing Masonic regalia:

Albert Pike03.jpg
451906.jpg
 
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That's NOT supposed to be Longstreet! Note especially the Indians in the background; what're THEY doing there? And why does he have grey hair? It's because this is a representation (and a hokey one at that) of Brig. Gen. Albert Pike of Arkansas, a huge man who weighed in at almost 300 pounds, a noted Fort Smith lawyer who was involved with various tribes - but not Plains tribes like illustrated! - in Indian Territory, and was appointed Commissioner to them in 1861 by the Confederate Government. ...
Fair point, thanks for noting. I thought as well that something can´t be right with the background and the general as well (knew the pictures of Pike). Nontheless there is some likeness and to be fair accuracy has never been the dominant concept for portraits, let alone for paintings from later eras. So the remaining question is when and how the title and subject of the painting were mixed up ...
 


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