What's your favorite Civil War battlefield and why?

Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Buckeye Bill

Captain
Forum Host
Civil War Photo Contest
Annual Winner
Joined
Jul 29, 2013
Second Battle of Boonville, Missouri. Most of you have never heard of Boonville, let alone the four times it factored into the war. The First Battle was more important, because it influenced the fact that Missouri stayed in the Union. However, Second Boonville is my favorite because I grew up in the former David Lilly farm house in the middle of the battle field. The battle featured three forces of State Guard attacking a fortified, fixed position occupied mostly by German immigrants. It featured civilian hostages. It featured brave men dying, but also a negotiated truce. It is all on private property today. There is simply nothing to compare with growing up on hallowed ground.
Great stuff, Pat!
 

Neagle2VR

Cadet
Joined
Jan 22, 2020
Location
Mechanicsville (Hanover Courthouse), Virginia
Second Battle of Boonville, Missouri. Most of you have never heard of Boonville, let alone the four times it factored into the war. The First Battle was more important, because it influenced the fact that Missouri stayed in the Union. However, Second Boonville is my favorite because I grew up in the former David Lilly farm house in the middle of the battle field. The battle featured three forces of State Guard attacking a fortified, fixed position occupied mostly by German immigrants. It featured civilian hostages. It featured brave men dying, but also a negotiated truce. It is all on private property today. There is simply nothing to compare with growing up on hallowed grou
Second Battle of Boonville, Missouri. Most of you have never heard of Boonville, let alone the four times it factored into the war. The First Battle was more important, because it influenced the fact that Missouri stayed in the Union. However, Second Boonville is my favorite because I grew up in the former David Lilly farm house in the middle of the battle field. The battle featured three forces of State Guard attacking a fortified, fixed position occupied mostly by German immigrants. It featured civilian hostages. It featured brave men dying, but also a negotiated truce. It is all on private property today. There is simply nothing to compare with growing up on hallowed ground.
I've heard of Booneville, MO, but not the battle. In 1886 my gg grandmother moved to Blackwater, just west of Booneville. I have letters postmarked Booneville, MO.
 

Neagle2VR

Cadet
Joined
Jan 22, 2020
Location
Mechanicsville (Hanover Courthouse), Virginia
There was a push in that direction September 29, 1864, north of the James River when Grant was hoping to weaken the garrison of Petersburg and to keep Early from being reinforced in the valley. When he took the works at Fort Harrison he writes;

"General Ord's corps advanced this morning and carried the very strong fortifications and long line of intrenchments below Chaffin's farm....Birney advanced at the same time from Deep Bottom, and carried the New Market road and intrenchments and scattered the enemy in every direction, though he captured but few. I left General Birney where the Mill road intersects the New Market and Richmond roads. The whole country is filled with field fortifications thus far."

A very good book about this specific action is covered in 'Richmond Redeemed', by the late Richard J. Sommers.
The excerpt was from Grant to Halleck, Sept. 29, 1864, Official Records, Series 1, Volume 42, Part 1, pages 20 and 21.
Lubliner.
I recently purchased this book, but haven't read much of it yet. My gg grandfather, Pvt. Columbus Raleigh Moore Co F 2nd VA Hvy. Art. (Capt. Allen's Co., aka Lunenburg Artillery or Lunberg Rebels) was at Chaffin's Farm until he transfered to Co E 18thVA Inf. in March 1865, then captured at the Battle Of Five Forks and sent to Point Lookout until June 1865. I have also read Capt C T Allen's letter to the
Richmond Sentinel October 13, 1864, in wich he criticizes the newspaper for praising the 2nd VA Reserves for their performance. He states "While the infantry, which were there to support the artillery, (a portion of them Reserves3, which a certain newspaper editor of Richmond delights so much to extol for their gallantry) left the fort, many of them before the enemy had got within good musket range."
What is iinteresting to me is that my paternal gg grandfather, Bernard Neagle, was in the 2nd VA Reserves.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Polloco

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
I intend to see the Jenkin's Ferry battlefield someday. Great great great grandfather was in that battle in Scurry's Brigade.Maybe it will become my favorite?
 

Virginia Dave

Sergeant
Member of the Month
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Location
Waynesboro, Virginia
I guess the one I happen to be on at a given time would be my favorite. But seriously I haven't visited enough to make an intelligent decision. I guess now it would be The Battlefield at New Market Virginia. It is the one I am the closest to other than Piedmont or Cedar mountain. I love them all. Oh yeah and Cross Keys. Now that I think about it the closest to my heart is The Battlefield at Saltville Virginia where my g g g Uncle was KIA at the first Battle of Saltville. His brother, my ggg Grandfather Manoah Shockley recovered his body and took it back home to the Shockley Cemetery to be buried. Col. LeGrand Shockley Oct. 2, 1864.
 

Eric Wittenberg

1st Lieutenant
Keeper of the Scales
Joined
Jun 2, 2013
Location
Columbus, OH
Gettysburg was my first and was my first love.

But I would have to say Brandy Station has eclipsed Gettysburg. There's so much blood, sweat and tears invested in saving the battlefield, which has its own majestic beauty, that it's become my favorite. I can stand on the restored crest of Fleetwood Hill, close my eyes, and see the ferocious hand to hand fighting that took place there on June 8, 1863 vividly in my mind's eye. I can hear the clash of sabres and the roar of artillery, and I can sense the sacrifices that were made there--both by the men who fought there, but also by the good people who have worked so hard to save that battlefield.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

DanSBHawk

Sergeant Major
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
Allatoona Pass. A small but bloody battle. It's a scenic little battlefield that still has the earthworks. While it is a bit overgrown with trees, it's still easy to stand in the earthen fort and imagine the intense fight.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Saint Jude

First Sergeant
Joined
Oct 15, 2018
Location
Heaven
Instead of "favorite" battlefield, which to me sounds like an oxymoron, I would say "most interesting." The battles I've found the most interesting to study are First Bull Run, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg." The most interesting to visit would probably be Gettysburg and Antietam.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Harms88

Private
Joined
Oct 13, 2019
Location
North of the Wall & South of the Canucks
Instead of "favorite" battlefield, which to me sounds like an oxymoron, I would say "most interesting." The battles I've found the most interesting to study are First Bull Run, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg." The most interesting to visit would probably be Gettysburg and Antietam.
I hear what you're saying, but there's a reason I didn't say "most interesting" but "favorite".

I think there's a vast difference between consider a place "a favorite" and simply considering it "to be most interesting". A favorite place is one that you'll visit often while one you find "most interesting" doesn't have the same appeal to return.

I have found in my life that just because one finds a place interesting doesn't mean you actually liked being there. Like I have visited the Lion House in Salt Lake City, the home of Brigham Young. Even though I am LDS and I found it a most interesting place, I have no particular inclination to visit it. On the other hand, I have visited the Jeanie Wade House in Gettysburg and personally I found it the more favorite of the two houses and would visit again.
 
Joined
Feb 1, 2017
Location
Florida
Sharpsburg for very personal reasons. My great-grandfather was in the 6th AL VI and they were in the sunken road that day. I stood there wondering how he got out of there alive.
Second is Resaca GA. The land is still private and so largely unspoiled. When I have been there for reenactments it feels like the ghosts of those who struggled there are with us.
 

kitty o'cairre

Private
Silver Patron
Joined
Aug 25, 2017
Location
north texas
good mornin mary ellen!
im still researchin Shiloe making sure of my facts with my ggg grandad..
its funny when i talk to some 'civil war' newbies ,,im a wee bit past that level not much but wee bit..LOL
that some think cuz their ancestors didnt fight at gettysburgh it really didnt seem 'important to know' and I sure told them 'What Fore! , told them even the Smallest of encounters no matter 'Where' Their ancestor mattered! Theres not as much on some of the smaller battlefields & battles,, BUT they ALL Mattered.
my irish opinon*
kitty
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

kitty o'cairre

Private
Silver Patron
Joined
Aug 25, 2017
Location
north texas
Sharpsburg for very personal reasons. My great-grandfather was in the 6th AL VI and they were in the sunken road that day. I stood there wondering how he got out of there alive.
Second is Resaca GA. The land is still private and so largely unspoiled. When I have been there for reenactments it feels like the ghosts of those who struggled there are with us.
That they are mary ellen That they are*
 

TheThirdDay

Cadet
Joined
Feb 4, 2020
Gettysburg. When you are done walking the battlefield for the day and are back in town, sitting in a cafe having coffee, you are still on the battlefield. And I know..of course, that things are over-commercialized in summer. But it is still my favorite place and always will be.
 

BronxYankee

Private
Joined
Aug 23, 2019
Sharpsburg for very personal reasons. My great-grandfather was in the 6th AL VI and they were in the sunken road that day. I stood there wondering how he got out of there alive.
Second is Resaca GA. The land is still private and so largely unspoiled. When I have been there for reenactments it feels like the ghosts of those who struggled there are with us.
Posted a couple of pics on the Battle of Atlanta page regarding the Battle of Resaca. They were 2 cannons on the grounds of Gordon County Sheriff Department in Calhoun part of that battle.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Joined
Mar 1, 2019
Location
Dedham, MA
Antietam, and if you go be sure to also go to Crampton's Gap which is at the top "south mountain" to the east. The road up to and down from it are steep but on the top is a somewhat flat field. The views from the top are great (Appalachian Trail crosses there) and it is easy to envision the overpowering Union coming up from the East to push the CSA back through the Gap. At the last minute, Howell Cobb's Georgia Legion came up from the West but suffered horrible losses attempting to hold the pass. I would never have known of it if two of my CSA cousins hadn't died on that bloody ground.
Lamar, Jefferson.jpg
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Top