What would have been a good Confederate States of America National Anthem?

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Aug 25, 2012
The Confederate States of America did not have an official National Anthem. The summer issue of Military Images has an article about possible anthem. So what song would have made a good anthem? Perhaps none of the songs from the Civil War era would have became the Confederate States of America anthem.
 

Claude Bauer

First Sergeant
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Jan 8, 2012
The Confederate States of America did not have an official National Anthem. The summer issue of Military Images has an article about possible anthem. So what song would have made a good anthem? Perhaps none of the songs from the Civil War era would have became the Confederate States of America anthem.
I would guess that "Dixie" would have been the hands-down favorite. Or possibly "The Bonnie Blue Flag." Maybe they would have changed it frequently, like they did with their flags.
 

FedericoFCavada

First Sergeant
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San Antonio, Texas
Dixie land?

America the Beautiful was often sung in lieu of a national anthem in the United States before the Star Spangled Banner was adopted.
In Germany, one would hear "Wacht am Rhein" most frequently before Deutschland Ueber Alles or the Deutsche lied became the nationalist national anthem... Today, in the modern Bundesrepublik it is still the same song, but they've omitted the rather problematic first stanza and start with the rather more Enlightenment sentiments "Einigkeit und recht und freiheit..."

The national anthem of France varied quite a bit over the 19th century before returning to the Marseillaise/ Song of the Army of the Rhin.
 
Joined
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Hannover, Germany
The Confederate States of America did not have an official National Anthem. The summer issue of Military Images has an article about possible anthem. So what song would have made a good anthem? Perhaps none of the songs from the Civil War era would have became the Confederate States of America anthem.

Um, I always thought "God Save the South" was the national anthem of the Confederate States ...

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But you are right, Wikipedia says it was only the "unofficial" national anthem
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God_Save_the_South
 

Chris Troiano

Private
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Fairfax, VA
God Save The South was never adopted as an official anthem for the Confederacy. The CSA asked for new compositions to be considered (since all the good anthems were US patriotic) and God Save The South was a standout favorite but was never official adopted. Although it was the "most popular", it never got close to being as popular as Dixie.
 

Claude Bauer

First Sergeant
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Jan 8, 2012
God Save The South was never adopted as an official anthem for the Confederacy. The CSA asked for new compositions to be considered (since all the good anthems were US patriotic) and God Save The South was a standout favorite but was never official adopted. Although it was the "most popular", it never got close to being as popular as Dixie.
Your post reminded me that there was a thread about a Civil War contest for the official US anthem on the forum a while back:

At the beginning of the Civil War, a group called the National Hymn Committee with 13 members was formed in New York for the purpose of finding a new song suitable for a national anthem. These men comprised politicians, lawyers, business leaders, and scholars living in New York City. To the winner would go a prize of $500 and "the thanks of a grateful nation."

https://civilwartalk.com/threads/th...e-couldnt-decide-on-a-national-anthem.169248/
 

Claude Bauer

First Sergeant
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Nothing wrong it "Dixie" except it was unoffical. Make it the official anthem and just leave it at "Dixie".
A lot of people feel that way, but it's a little late for the CSA to be doing anything officially. For whatever reason, they chose not to use it as their anthem, which is baffling to me considering its popularity.

Even the author of the song, a northerner by the name of Daniel Emmett, considered it the de facto anthem of the Confederacy, and was ticked off that they had used his tune for their cause. He was a former fifer in the Union army and wrote the Drummer's and Fifer's Guide for the Union army during the war, in which he included the tune on page 79 as "Dixie. No. 21" in a list of 25 "Fancy Quicksteps."
 

Grant's Tomb

Corporal
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Apr 4, 2020
At Jefferson Davis's inauguration at the Alabama statehouse in Montgomery, some people sang Farewell to the Star Spangled Banner
 
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