What was it that made any slave state more of a sister state to S.C. than any Free State?

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jgoodguy

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#21
Gemeinschaft and Gesellschaft

Gemeinschaft (German pronunciation: [ɡəˈmaɪnʃaft]) and Gesellschaft ([ɡəˈzɛlʃaft]), generally translated as "community and society", are categories which were used by the German sociologist Ferdinand Tönnies in order to categorize social ties into two dichotomous sociological types which define each other. Max Weber, who is generally recognized as being a founding figure in sociology, also wrote extensively about the relationship between Gemeinschaft and Gesellschaft. Weber wrote in direct response to Tönnies.[1]

The Gemeinschaft–Gesellschaft dichotomy was proposed by Tönnies as a purely conceptual tool rather than as an ideal type in the way it was used by Max Weber to accentuate the key elements of a historic/social change. According to the dichotomy, social ties can be categorized, on one hand, as belonging to personal social interactions, and the roles, values, and beliefs based on such interactions (Gemeinschaft, German, commonly translated as "community"), or on the other hand as belonging to indirect interactions, impersonal roles, formal values, and beliefs based on such interactions (Gesellschaft, German, commonly translated as "society").[2]
A map of 2 cultures. The North was not highly industrialized but it was largely urban in 1860.
Reference
ransom.civil_.war_.us_.figure6.jpg

.
Source: United States Population Census, 1860.
Perhaps the best single indicator of how pervasive the “market revolution” was in the Northern and Western states is the rise of urban areas in areas where markets have become important. Map 1 plots the 292 counties that reported an “urban population” in 1860. (The 1860 Census Office defined an “urban place” as a town or city having a population of at least 2,500 people.) Table 2 presents some additional statistics on urbanization by region. In 1860 6.1 million people — roughly one out of five persons in the United States — lived in an urban county. A glance at either the map or Table 2 reveals the enormous difference in urban development in the South compared to the Northern states. More than two-thirds of all urban counties were in the Northeast and West; those two regions accounted for nearly 80 percent of the urban population of the country. By contrast, less than 7 percent of people in the 11 Southern states of Table 2 lived in urban counties.
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jgoodguy

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#23
Food.

In the North, food was prepared by wives.
In the South if was cooked by....
By far, mostly wives. Only the very affluent could afford house servants. If the average slaveowner had a chose between his wife cooking and spending good money for a cook instead of a field hand, I'd bet on the field hand.
 

CW Buff

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#24
What was it that made any slave state more of a sister state to S.C. than any Free State?
I would only note that 4 slave states felt more like sisters to the free states than to SC and the other secessionist slave states. Perhaps they felt they were more daughters of the Union than sisters of states.
 

jgoodguy

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#25
I would only note that 4 slave states felt more like sisters to the free states than to SC and the other secessionist slave states. Perhaps they felt they were more daughters of the Union than sisters of states.
Could be the ratio of slaves to free persons. There is a sharp and total break between Union and the Confederate States.

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CW Buff

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#26
Could be the ratio of slaves to free persons. There is a sharp and total break between Union and the Confederate States.
You know me. IMHO, there was no could be about it. Slavery had a deleterious effect on the brain that was directly proportional to its prevalence. The effect was demonstrable within states as well as between them.
 
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#29
Patterns of migration. Most of this was westward, Not south-north.

You lived in SC. Your sister married and moved to AL or MS.
True to a great extent but not always. Almost all of my Louisiana and Mississippi CW relations came from VA, NC, SC, GA and AL via a western migration path. They remained in contact with their relatives east of them who stayed behind.

However, there is one large branch that originated in NW PA when one son in a large family decided in about 1840 to ride the rivers to New Orleans, seeking I presume, a better life. A tailor, he eventually settled in Mississippi, was granted a postal route between Port Gibson and Gallatin, bought land, farmed, acquired about 20 slaves and became somewhat successful. At the outbreak of the CW he was the county treasurer, so he integrated himself into southern ways very thoroughly. He sent 4 sons to the war where one was killed (he had been a student at Ole Miss), the other three wounded to varying degrees. Afterward he ended what had been regular contact with his PA kin but interestingly has “From Pennsylvania” on his tombstone in Mississippi.
 

CSA Today

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#30
I think the question of what bound the sections together is a really interesting one. I certainly agree that slavery (as both an economic and social factor) was the primary bond that made slave states more akin to each other than to free states.

But I think there are other elements that bound White Southern society together. Here's a few items for discussion:

I think as @CSA Today pointed out, regional/community bonds were significant and very powerful in dividing North from South.

Among the elites of the sections, you find differences in how they culturally viewed themselves and each other:
  • Generally Northerners saw themselves as industrious, pious and frugal. Whereas they saw the South as generally luxurious, lax and extravagant.
  • Southerners tended to view themselves in the Cavalier tradition, that is chivalrous, noble and honorable versus Northerners who were greedy, false and uncharitable in their view.
In the North (again especially in the Northeast) a larger proportion of the population lived and worked in urban/industrial settings. Whereas the larger proportion of White Southerners were rural, yeoman farmers.

Related to this, the North was significantly more industrialized than the South, where the economy was dominated by agriculture. So, the economies of the two sections had traveled in entirely different directions (largely, of course, because of the implementation of slavery).
Margaret Mitchell was a little kinder in her characterization, but then again she didn't live during the war.

“Yankees are pretty much like Southerners – except with worse manners, of course, and terrible accents.” — Author Margaret Mitchell

“Our enemies are a traditionless, homeless race. From the days of Cromwell to the present day they have been the disturbers of the peace of the world...After what has happened the last two years, my only wonder is how we consented to live for so long with such miscreants. Were it ever prosed to enter again into a Union with such a people, I could no more consent to it than to trust myself in a den of thieves.”
President Jefferson Davis [26 December 1862]









 
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#31
Margaret Mitchell was a little kinder in her characterization, but then again she didn't live during the war.

“Yankees are pretty much like Southerners – except with worse manners, of course, and terrible accents.” — Author Margaret Mitchell

“Our enemies are a traditionless, homeless race. From the days of Cromwell to the present day they have been the disturbers of the peace of the world...After what has happened the last two years, my only wonder is how we consented to live for so long with such miscreants. Were it ever prosed to enter again into a Union with such a people, I could no more consent to it than to trust myself in a den of thieves.”
President Jefferson Davis [26 December 1862]
I wish Jeff Davis had met some of the folk I have known in the south, there are a good amount of pretty vile people down South I have had to deal with over the years!

Kevin Dally
 
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#33
Margaret Mitchell was a little kinder in her characterization, but then again she didn't live during the war.

“Yankees are pretty much like Southerners – except with worse manners, of course, and terrible accents.” — Author Margaret Mitchell

“Our enemies are a traditionless, homeless race. From the days of Cromwell to the present day they have been the disturbers of the peace of the world...After what has happened the last two years, my only wonder is how we consented to live for so long with such miscreants. Were it ever prosed to enter again into a Union with such a people, I could no more consent to it than to trust myself in a den of thieves.”
President Jefferson Davis [26 December 1862]








A consistent thing I’ve noticed over a lifetime is that one of the first things a Yankee tries to do after moving south is tell you how things were done better where he came from.
 

CSA Today

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#37
I wish Jeff Davis had met some of the folk I have known in the south, there are a good amount of pretty vile people down South I have had to deal with over the years!

Kevin Dally
So have I, but parts of the North especially New Jersey and parts of New York easily take the prize hands down for such folks per square mile.
 

jgoodguy

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#39

byron ed

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#40
"embarrassing " seems akin to complaining IMHO, just remember you have the right not to participate if it embarrasses you. Thanks for the remainder of your comments.
I would have preferred to have made some sort of insightful contribution, but in the absence of anyone else stepping up with the painfully obvious answer to the OP (Slavery) I sacrificed to do it; and you're welcome.

If I had only waited ...Hartwell soon stepped up to it as well.
 
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