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What the Confederate States Constitution says about slavery

Discussion in 'Civil War History - Secession and Politics' started by Zeeboe, May 14, 2012.

  1. dvrmte

    dvrmte Major

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    When people continue to violate the law without fear of the penalties, the penalties are made more severe.

    But when a common farmer broke his plow or a state built their railroads, each had to pay tribute to the northern industrialist, or in other words bail them out.
     

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  3. dvrmte

    dvrmte Major

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    Sorry but that is a pathetic response. Your position is that the South has held this country back? I figured you would run back to your security blanket rather than defend your position.
     
  4. Red Harvest

    Red Harvest 2nd Lieutenant Trivia Game Winner

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    Got any other ad hominems you want to throw? :frantic:

    A full explanation would be completely lost on you, so I'm not going to bother wasting my time. :byebye:
     
  5. unionblue

    unionblue Brev. Brig. Gen'l Member of the Year

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    dvrmte,

    The above does not change the fact that the tariff rates were the same in Boston as they were in Charleston, whatever year they were passed.

    Unionblue
     
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  6. wilber6150

    wilber6150 Brev. Brig. Gen'l Retired Moderator

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    And when common people everywhere in the country wanted to make a cake or muffins or dare I say cookies they had to pay tribute to Lousiana? So how many common farmers bought plows imported from overseas?
     
  7. DanF

    DanF Captain

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    Don't forget how the New England shipping industry had to pay tribute to Kentucky since the shipping industry was the largest customer for cordage.
     
  8. dvrmte

    dvrmte Major

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    [​IMG]
     
  9. dvrmte

    dvrmte Major

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    Sugar is a luxury, a plow is a necessity. Regardless of where the plow came from, the price was affected by the tariff.
     
  10. dvrmte

    dvrmte Major

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    Kentucky was a slave state but it clamored for protection of its' hemp, which was used for cotton bagging, which each bale of cotton was wrapped in. Kentucky wasn't a cotton state.
     
  11. unionblue

    unionblue Brev. Brig. Gen'l Member of the Year

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    And regardless where the plow and the sugar were bought, it had the same tariff on them as it did in the North and the South.
     
  12. wilber6150

    wilber6150 Brev. Brig. Gen'l Retired Moderator

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    Sugar is a luxary? Are baked good luxaries? Bread, rolls? Sugar was an everyday item used by hundreds of thousands of poor and strugling people thru out the country who had to pay inflated prices just for the protection of industries centralized in two Southern states yet it always gets overlooked...How about hemp? Grown mostly in the Southern states but whose tarriffs hit New Englands ships industry the hardest...Hemp rope certainly isn't a luxary on ships...
    Then theres pig iron, the tarriffs on imported pig iron protected that industry in Virginia, while at the same time allowed it to directly compete with more modern plants in Penn. unfairly...Yet, these protections are never heard about...

    The price on the plow would only be affected if it was made with imported iron, or was manufactured overseas.. And since there was a variety of companies already making plows and were large enough to compete with the bigger English companies using material mined in the US, they wouldn't be affected...
     
  13. unionblue

    unionblue Brev. Brig. Gen'l Member of the Year

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  14. Red Harvest

    Red Harvest 2nd Lieutenant Trivia Game Winner

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    Demonstrates how tariffs have bounced back and forth with section after section unhappy about each change.
     
  15. Sneathen

    Sneathen Sergeant

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    Yes, mentions ones that free-traders leave out, like 1833, 1846 and 1857. From what I read tariffs kept going up and up and up...
     
  16. dvrmte

    dvrmte Major

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    ...And up until the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act took us into the Great Depression. The 1833 Compromise featured high rates that were to be gradually reduced to the levels of 1816 by 1842. Then the clamor brought higher tariffs in 1842.
     
  17. 1SGDan

    1SGDan Captain

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    All of which the Southern represenatives in Congress had the opportunity to vote on.
     
  18. Sneathen

    Sneathen Sergeant

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    No mean to go off topic but that was more to due with the Federal Reserve, yes the tariff didn't help but all other nations were enforcing high tariffs.
     
  19. dvrmte

    dvrmte Major

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    Some of those could be called retalitory.
     
  20. dvrmte

    dvrmte Major

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    But where were the checks and balances to prevent the tyranny of the majority. This country was formed as a Republic, not a pure democracy. It seems you would think it okay for 200,000 factory workers living in a city of 3 square miles deciding what's best for 2,000 farmers living in an area of 2,000 square miles. The real twist is the 2,000 farmers are actually contributing more to the nations wealth than the 200,000 factory workers. What do the farmers receive for their contribution? I'll tell you what they received; they paid higher production costs due to the high tariffs put on them by the factory workers. Meanwhile the factory workers voted themselves a nice raise due to the tariff that would offset the affect of higher prices. Then due to the trade barrier presented by the tariff, foreign trade was suppressed. The suppression of trade resulted in a glut of products waiting for export. That glut caused prices to fall for the farmers products.
     
  21. Red Harvest

    Red Harvest 2nd Lieutenant Trivia Game Winner

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    South Carolina, always whining about how they don't ALWAYS get an over-represented break. 2,000 "farmers"??? More like 2,ooo feudal lords ruling over slaves who did the actual work for their pathetic girlie man excuses for masters. How many of them were busy raping slaves and breaking up families, wonderful examples of humanity that these entitled lords were? Hey, most of us don't give **** how much property you own, you get ONE vote...or at least you should. I'll take ANY of 200,000 factory workers over any of the 2,000 slave lords ANY day of the week.

    Do you hear that? It is the world's smallest violin playing a sorrowful melody. Let's see what Miss Teen South Carolina has to say:


    Wait a minute, is that dvrmte? Could be...

    What this nation really needs is the same folks that chose the above representative of their state, to represent the will of the rest of us. /snark They do such a great job of deciding for the rest of us, just ask the other Confederate States who followed their clueless lead.

    The best part is listening to the priviliged whine about how they didn't get absolutely everything they wanted.

    You wanted an explanation of historical egocentrism, dvrmte? You got it, boy!
     

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