What Sort of Man was Edward "Allegheny" Johnson?

JeffBrooks

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I feel that this particular fellow gets overlooked by Civil War history and I'm wanting to know more about him. What sort of personality did he have? Since he was popular at Richmond dinner parties and had a reputation as a ladies man, I assume he was pretty friendly and had a good humor. Anyone have any anecdotes about "Old Clubby" that might illuminate what sort of person he was?
 

Luke Freet

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I feel that this particular fellow gets overlooked by Civil War history and I'm wanting to know more about him. What sort of personality did he have? Since he was popular at Richmond dinner parties and had a reputation as a ladies man, I assume he was pretty friendly and had a good humor. Anyone have any anecdotes about "Old Clubby" that might illuminate what sort of person he was?
He seemed to use a walking stick in battle; I read Rhea's book on Spotsylvania, when the Mule Shoe was overrun, he was standing by a cannon swinging his walking stick like a club. He seemed to be rather affable; when he got captured, he was brought over to Grant's and Meade's headquarters, where he and the Union commanders sat around chatting with the captured commander, Meade pocketting the reports of Johnson's Entire division being captured. I've also heard he was rather brave, earning praise in West Virginia leading the 12th Georgia, earning a promotion and his nicknamed "Allegheny" for his actions there. Solid commander from all I've gleaned, I can't really fault him for much.
 
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We did a biography on him several months ago and I recall he had a eye that winked uncomfortably from an old war wound in the Mexican war. The Ladies assumed he was flirting with them. He was a 47 year old batchelor. This was when he was recovering from his Civil War wound to the ankle.He is mentioned in Mary Chesnuts diary and He spent nearly a year "recuperating"in Richmond's social circle. He had a reputation as a ladies man.
 
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John Wolf Smith

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I feel that this particular fellow gets overlooked by Civil War history and I'm wanting to know more about him. What sort of personality did he have? Since he was popular at Richmond dinner parties and had a reputation as a ladies man, I assume he was pretty friendly and had a good humor. Anyone have any anecdotes about "Old Clubby" that might illuminate what sort of person he was?
Lee was considered making Johnson acting Corps commander of the First Corps during the Wilderness. Also I have read that he is one of Lee's fighting division commanders and one of the most offensive generals in 1864.
 

Luke Freet

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Lee was considered making Johnson acting Corps commander of the First Corps during the Wilderness. Also I have read that he is one of Lee's fighting division commanders and one of the most offensive generals in 1864.
Certainly. He was at the forefront of the Wilderness (Saunders Field Front), and at Spotsylvania. As well as Jackson's first victory at McDowell.
 

John Wolf Smith

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Certainly. He was at the forefront of the Wilderness (Saunders Field Front), and at Spotsylvania. As well as Jackson's first victory at McDowell.
I think Lee getting Johnson to led the Jackson's old Division instead of Trimble may have been a good thing. Would the Division have done better at Chancellorsville if Johnson had the command instead of Colston?
 

Luke Freet

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I think Lee getting Johnson to led the Jackson's old Division instead of Trimble may have been a good thing. Would the Division have done better at Chancellorsville if Johnson had the command instead of Colston?
Certainly would have been better than Colston. May need to read more on Chancellorsville, but Colston didn't come off too well in the aftermath, being replaced and all in both command of the division as well as the brigade (which went to George Steuart).
 

ErnieMac

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Johnson received a wound to his ankle which incapacitated him until May 1863. It was not completely healed and he used a hickory stick to aid his walking and, reportedly, as a prod to recalcitrant soldiers.

By the time Johnson was exchanged in August 1864 his division was in the capable hands of MG John B. Gordon. Johnson was transferred west to the Army of Tennessee taking over J. Patton Anderson's Division in S. D. Lee's Corps following Anderson's wounding at Jonesborough. Johnson led the division in the Battles of Franklin and Nashville but was captured again at Nashville.
 

Luke Freet

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Johnson received a wound to his ankle which incapacitated him until May 1863. It was not completely healed and he used a hickory stick to aid his walking and, reportedly, as a prod to recalcitrant soldiers.

By the time Johnson was exchanged in August 1864 his division was in the capable hands of MG John B. Gordon. Johnson was transferred west to the Army of Tennessee taking over J. Patton Anderson's Division in S. D. Lee's Corps following Anderson's wounding at Jonesborough. Johnson led the division in the Battles of Franklin and Nashville but was captured again at Nashville.
Did a fine job during the Franklin-Nashville Campaign. Lee considered him a possible fit for Corps Command after the Wilderness. Maybe he could have gotten 2nd Corps under his command instead, if Early was bumped up to the Valley Army Command.
 
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