What Soldier Deserved An MoH, Whose Actions May Have Been Overlooked?

JPK Huson 1863

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#1
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It's an opinion question out of an awful war. Accounts from battles still can't give us an idea what it was like to live through say, hand to hand fighting at The Muleshoe, at Spotsylvania, or bang together a pontoon bridge under fire, at Fredericksburg. Vets here have a better inkling than anyone else.

Plus, if it helps, March, 1863 is when they changed the rules ( thankfully ). Still, since it's opinion, including actions from the beginning is fair. Had no idea Alonzo Cushing only made qualifications by a few months,

moh 1863.JPG

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=hvd.hnfbk4;view=2up;seq=80;size=150

moh clip.JPG

Article mentions 1862, a little confused- seems to be 1863? Since inception, 3,517 of our most prestigious military awards have been issued. Data base, since 1861, below. MoH began as Navy, which did not last long. 1,522 recipients were Civil War soldiers- and one female doctor, Mary Walker.

http://mohmuseum.org/recipient-database/

Found a great list and quite a few MoH from Gettysburg, along with other battles-

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Anyway, someone bumped a conversation on Alonzo Cushing whose 150 year, belated MoH so delighted us. Yes, a well known act, grown legendary.

Does anyone know of men who, in your opinion fulfill the requirements laid down to be considered for a Medal of Honor, please? And why?
 

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#4
Pvt. Charles P. Shadrack and Pvt. George G. Wilson, Andrews Raiders. Bother were authorized the medal in 2008, but neither were awarded to their descendants as of this date.
With a couple dozen MOHs during the raid why were these two left out?
 
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#5
A great place to visit in regards to the MOH is at the Ft. Benning GA Army museum. Within the museum is the "Hall of Valor" that lists every recipient of the award beginning from its inception. Some of the ACW soldiers have images attached. The CW soldiers account for quite a lot, more so than other conflicts. It's a breathtaking exhibit. I visited the museum in 2009 when my son graduated boot there. Some of the sections had not been completed yet (like the American Revolution). I'd love to go back one day and see it now that it's finished up.
 

JPK Huson 1863

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#8
George Sears Greene for his action on Culp's Hill during the Battle of Gettysburg on July 2 and 3, 1863.

Reported to be outnumbered by a 4:1 margin Greene and his men inflicted casualties at an 8:1 rate and kept the southern soldiers from turning the Union right flank.

Yes, thank you! Not to detract a thing from actions elsewhere at Gettysburg- goodness knows a list inclusive of sobering ' what ifs ' resounds to this day, were it not for what men did. Greene for some reason doesn't receive the ' He and his men did what???? ', like you'd think. It's such an astonishing story, especially looking at the ground, and they did it anyway.
 

Sbc

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#10
A great place to visit in regards to the MOH is at the Ft. Benning GA Army museum. Within the museum is the "Hall of Valor" that lists every recipient of the award beginning from its inception. Some of the ACW soldiers have images attached. The CW soldiers account for quite a lot, more so than other conflicts. It's a breathtaking exhibit. I visited the museum in 2009 when my son graduated boot there. Some of the sections had not been completed yet (like the American Revolution). I'd love to go back one day and see it now that it's finished up.
Just added this to my bucket list lol
 
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#11
F85980B9-0924-4109-A087-2BD94C3DE4BC.jpeg
Is that from Harpers of Leslie's, or a post war book, please? Crazy what can be found, before camera were everywhere, isn't it? It isn't the same as a photo but we hear these names and can at least 'see ' someone, a little.
The Daring and Suffering- a history of the Andrews Railroad Raid
Not where I found the one posted earlier, but has many plates including this one.
Mark
 
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#12
Yes, thank you! Not to detract a thing from actions elsewhere at Gettysburg- goodness knows a list inclusive of sobering ' what ifs ' resounds to this day, were it not for what men did. Greene for some reason doesn't receive the ' He and his men did what???? ', like you'd think. It's such an astonishing story, especially looking at the ground, and they did it anyway.
George Sears Greene's revolver.
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JPK Huson 1863

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#13

Hate to go over the top but HA! That's crazy cool. Thank you! I understand Sears isn't considered the best source for ' Gettysburg' but first became a little smitten years and years ago, reading of Greene, there. I've never been a Chamberlain basher and in fact, he did what he did as a darn college prof, which was the astonishing part. Greene's engagement is much harder to find, written out minute by minute like we see LRT but gee whiz- from arguing with Geary over breastworks to those single rank battle lines- it's hair raising ( never been able to figure out why Geary did not wish Greene to use breastworks? Must have saved the position? ) .

Does he have an account of the battle, please?
 

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#17
For my two cents worth, I'm going with Col. Patrick O'Rorke of the 140th NY infantry. At Gettysburg the 140th was called upon by Gen. G.K. Warren to defend Little Round Top. O'Rorke initially declined Warren's request for assistance because he was under orders to follow his brigade to relieve the Third Corps. Warren told him, "Never mind that, Paddy. Bring them up on the double-quick and don't stop for aligning. I'll take the responsibility." O'Rorke rushed his men to the crest of the hill and plunged down its western face without pause ( didn't have time to load their muskets, BTW ), driving the attacking Confederates back down the slope. During the counterattack, O'Rorke caught up with his regimental colors and, mounting a rock to urge on his men, was struck in the neck and fell dead.
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#18
For some reason people can get overlooked in War. Why were two people overlooked, who knows. Even when the medals were authorized, why have they not been awarded. Oddly enough other posthumous awards were given to Andrews Raiders, which was unusual given that later no such awards of the MOH happened again during the ACW until Alonzo Cushing recently.
 

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