What NON- Civil War Books (Any genre) Are You Reading or Have Most Recently Read?

chaloner

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This book my cousin wrote is about my great grandfather who fought in the Spanish-American War and the Philippine Insurrection in the Philippines and talks about him what he did during World War 2 against the Japanese invasion. Great book to read hope you like it. :smile: On Amazon.

A Cowboy in the Pacific: And Other Forgotten Americans
https://www.amazon.com/dp/1090727658/?tag=civilwartalkc-20
41XlEG5l8xL._SX398_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
 

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matthew mckeon

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Lizzie
The new movie about the famed self made heiress of Fall River, Massachusetts, Miss Borden. A "passion project" of its star, Chloe Sevigny, and also starring Kristen Stewart.

Sveigny is quoted as saying she approached it like a game of Clue: the same playing pieces, Lizzie, her sister Emma, the father, Andrew, the step mother Abby, the overnight visitor John Morse, the maid Bridget Sullivan. Its always someone with a hatchet in the upstairs guest room and the downstairs parlor. But who, or what combination of whos? And why?
 

matthew mckeon

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Lizzie
The new movie about the famed self made heiress of Fall River, Massachusetts, Miss Borden. A "passion project" of its star, Chloe Sevigny, and also starring Kristen Stewart.

Sveigny is quoted as saying she approached it like a game of Clue: the same playing pieces, Lizzie, her sister Emma, the father, Andrew, the step mother Abby, the overnight visitor John Morse, the maid Bridget Sullivan. Its always someone with a hatchet in the upstairs guest room and the downstairs parlor. But who, or what combination of whos? And why?
Sevigny plays Lizzie as a women devalued by her family and society, an old maid with a difficult personality and prone to "spells" shown here as petite mal epilepsy. She's under pressure from her overbearing father, distant stepmother, and a society that considers her not worth considering. As the tension grows, she turns to the quiet maid for comfort and validation.

The villain is Mr. Borden, who sexually preys on Bridget Sullivan, is a stingy and ruthless businessman and basically deserves what's coming to him.
 

matthew mckeon

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Sevigny plays Lizzie as a women devalued by her family and society, an old maid with a difficult personality and prone to "spells" shown here as petite mal epilepsy. She's under pressure from her overbearing father, distant stepmother, and a society that considers her not worth considering. As the tension grows, she turns to the quiet maid for comfort and validation.

The villain is Mr. Borden, who sexually preys on Bridget Sullivan, is a stingy and ruthless businessman and basically deserves what's coming to him.
Sevigny does a good job with Lizzie, a person who doesn't fit in anywhere, put upon, insulted, afraid of being institutionalized, of being cut off of her family's will, trying to protect her friend from her father. Her anger builds as she plots and one summer's day, she explodes in a ferocious, but directed violence. Afterwards she shows an eerie and even menacing confidence.
 

matthew mckeon

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Sevigny does a good job with Lizzie, a person who doesn't fit in anywhere, put upon, insulted, afraid of being institutionalized, of being cut off of her family's will, trying to protect her friend from her father. Her anger builds as she plots and one summer's day, she explodes in a ferocious, but directed violence. Afterwards she shows an eerie and even menacing confidence.
The actual Lizzie Borden struck me as someone just smart enough to let her lawyers do the talking, while Sullivan displayed a brisk commonsense manner, that couldn't be shaken besides repeated interrogations by police and the district attorney.
The movie was filmed in Savannah, and house was larger and nicer than the actual Borden house. They tried to convey Andrew's stinginess by having the paint peeling on the outside.
 

matthew mckeon

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This thread has been moved to "Campfire Chat Forum" I understand the logic, but hate all change on principle.

The Furious Hours
This is a double book in a sense. The first story is about Reverend Willie Maxwell, an army veteran who bossed a pulpwood cutting crew and worked as a part time minister in the Lake Martin region of eastern Alabama. Maxwell slipped easily from the working in the woods to his dapper dark suits as a minister and back again. He had a talent for leaving no traces.

Maxwell's relatives had the habit of dying suddenly, sometimes in seemingly staged car accidents, and sometimes they just died, without the coroner and investigators being able to determine a cause. They all had one thing in common, multiple life insurance policies, made out to the Reverend. People became terrified of the Reverend, his odd, formal speech, his elegant dress, the ease he escaped angry law officers, state investigators, and insurance companies. Rumors spread and grew: he practiced voodoo, changed into different shapes, travelled at supernatural speeds, had a voodoo room in his house that contains potions, studied with the feared "Seven Sisters" in New Orleans.

At the funeral of a niece, one of her cousins walked up to Reverend, and shot him to death in front of three hundred people. The book is the story of his trial.

The second part of the book is about Harper Lee. She moved to Alexander City, and began an intense and thorough investigation with the goal of writing a book. She had assisted Truman Capote in researching and writing the classic In Cold Blood, and hadn't written anything herself since To Kill a Mockingbird. She was going to write a new book, about the Reverend.
 

matthew mckeon

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This thread has been moved to "Campfire Chat Forum" I understand the logic, but hate all change on principle.

The Furious Hours
This is a double book in a sense. The first story is about Reverend Willie Maxwell, an army veteran who bossed a pulpwood cutting crew and worked as a part time minister in the Lake Martin region of eastern Alabama. Maxwell slipped easily from the working in the woods to his dapper dark suits as a minister and back again. He had a talent for leaving no traces.

Maxwell's relatives had the habit of dying suddenly, sometimes in seemingly staged car accidents, and sometimes they just died, without the coroner and investigators being able to determine a cause. They all had one thing in common, multiple life insurance policies, made out to the Reverend. People became terrified of the Reverend, his odd, formal speech, his elegant dress, the ease he escaped angry law officers, state investigators, and insurance companies. Rumors spread and grew: he practiced voodoo, changed into different shapes, travelled at supernatural speeds, had a voodoo room in his house that contains potions, studied with the feared "Seven Sisters" in New Orleans.

At the funeral of a niece, one of her cousins walked up to Reverend, and shot him to death in front of three hundred people. The book is the story of his trial.

The second part of the book is about Harper Lee. She moved to Alexander City, and began an intense and thorough investigation with the goal of writing a book. She had assisted Truman Capote in researching and writing the classic In Cold Blood, and hadn't written anything herself since To Kill a Mockingbird. She was going to write a new book, about the Reverend.
Lee did an enormous amount of research, but as we know, never ended up writing either a true crime book or a novel based on the case.

The book has a certain witty elegance to it. "Nelle Harper Lee descended from a Confederate soldier, but not that one." The lawyer that sued insurance companies on Maxwell's behalf made so much from the cases his office was known as "Maxwell House."

Lee, determined to be as factual as possible(she was critical of some of the liberties that Capote took), found the process frustrating, a "mountain of rumor and a molehill of fact." An excellent interviewer, like the Reverend, she had the gift of being trusted by people, she was irritated by people's tendency to exaggerate, fabricate and repeat rumors. "I am disappointed in the veracity of these witnesses" she remarked dryly. In the end the enigmatic Reverend, his possible crimes, and how they were executed elude her. The only thing she was sure of was "The Reverend didn't believe in voodoo. But he did believe in insurance."
 

Norm53

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This thread has been moved to "Campfire Chat Forum" I understand the logic, but hate all change on principle.

The Furious Hours
This is a double book in a sense. The first story is about Reverend Willie Maxwell, an army veteran who bossed a pulpwood cutting crew and worked as a part time minister in the Lake Martin region of eastern Alabama. Maxwell slipped easily from the working in the woods to his dapper dark suits as a minister and back again. He had a talent for leaving no traces.

Maxwell's relatives had the habit of dying suddenly, sometimes in seemingly staged car accidents, and sometimes they just died, without the coroner and investigators being able to determine a cause. They all had one thing in common, multiple life insurance policies, made out to the Reverend. People became terrified of the Reverend, his odd, formal speech, his elegant dress, the ease he escaped angry law officers, state investigators, and insurance companies. Rumors spread and grew: he practiced voodoo, changed into different shapes, travelled at supernatural speeds, had a voodoo room in his house that contains potions, studied with the feared "Seven Sisters" in New Orleans.

At the funeral of a niece, one of her cousins walked up to Reverend, and shot him to death in front of three hundred people. The book is the story of his trial.

The second part of the book is about Harper Lee. She moved to Alexander City, and began an intense and thorough investigation with the goal of writing a book. She had assisted Truman Capote in researching and writing the classic In Cold Blood, and hadn't written anything herself since To Kill a Mockingbird. She was going to write a new book, about the Reverend.
Reviews are all over the place, so on principle I should not bother to read it. But I might just do that for more evidence on why one must never trust the NYT's book reviews.
 

Tomasz

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I am almost done with The Defense of Moscow 1941: The Northern Flank by Jack Radey and Charles Sharp. A solid work, it helped a lot to fill certain gap in my East Front knowledge.
Recently I read the following books that may be available in the US market:
D. French, Raising Churchill's Army: The British Army and the War against Germany 1919-1945 - excellent study. Certain remarks can be made about the US Army as well, I believe.
J. Lopez, O. Wieviorka, Les mythes de la Seconde Guerre mondiale (myths of the second world war). A collective work, and as often is the case - some chapters are better than the others. Overall, it was worth to read. I liked that the authors did not try to "bust" the myths by force; they pointed out were they came from and what grains of truth they contain.
 

matthew mckeon

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Reviews are all over the place, so on principle I should not bother to read it. But I might just do that for more evidence on why one must never trust the NYT's book reviews.
It's interesting and well written. I would recommend it.
 

DaveBrt

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Reading Bradley Peniston, NO HIGHER HONOR, Saving the USS Samuel B. Roberts in the Persian Gulf. The Roberts was an FFG, mined in 1988.
 

Norm53

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Lee did an enormous amount of research, but as we know, never ended up writing either a true crime book or a novel based on the case.

The book has a certain witty elegance to it. "Nelle Harper Lee descended from a Confederate soldier, but not that one." The lawyer that sued insurance companies on Maxwell's behalf made so much from the cases his office was known as "Maxwell House."

Lee, determined to be as factual as possible(she was critical of some of the liberties that Capote took), found the process frustrating, a "mountain of rumor and a molehill of fact." An excellent interviewer, like the Reverend, she had the gift of being trusted by people, she was irritated by people's tendency to exaggerate, fabricate and repeat rumors. "I am disappointed in the veracity of these witnesses" she remarked dryly. In the end the enigmatic Reverend, his possible crimes, and how they were executed elude her. The only thing she was sure of was "The Reverend didn't believe in voodoo. But he did believe in insurance."
Facts do not make a novel. In "fact", they are unnecessary. Novels are the imaginations of the author. Facts might give the novel plausibility, like in an historical novel, but that is all. If Lee couldn't make facts, however elusive, into a successful novel, then she could not have been much of a novelist to begin with.

Considering that Lee could never write another novel, although she tried hard enough, might the success of Mockingbird suggest that it was the product of Capote whispering frequently into her ear?
 
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matthew mckeon

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Facts do not make a novel. In "fact", they are unnecessary. Novels are the imaginations of the author. Facts might give the novel plausibility, like in an historical novel, but that is all. If Lee couldn't make facts, however elusive, into a successful novel, then she could not have been much of a novelist to begin with.

Considering that Lee could never write another novel, although she tried hard enough, might the success of Mockingbird suggest that it was the product of Capote whispering frequently into her ear?
Nope. Lee's process of writing Mockingbird is pretty well known. She started with a novel called "Go Set a Watchman" with the familiar characters set in the present day(for her, late 50s, early 60) and a collection of stories about her Depression era childhood. With the advice of her editor, she set aside "Watchman" and worked the stories into the novel we now know. Her correspondence with her editor, and working out various parts of "Mockingbird" don't show any sign of Truman Capote.

Your statement "she could not have been much of a novelist to begin with" is unique.
 

Norm53

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Nope. Lee's process of writing Mockingbird is pretty well known. She started with a novel called "Go Set a Watchman" with the familiar characters set in the present day(for her, late 50s, early 60) and a collection of stories about her Depression era childhood. With the advice of her editor, she set aside "Watchman" and worked the stories into the novel we now know. Her correspondence with her editor, and working out various parts of "Mockingbird" don't show any sign of Truman Capote.

Your statement "she could not have been much of a novelist to begin with" is unique.
Maybe her editor was the novelist? How voluminous were the letters between the correspondents? And where was Capote when she "wrote" Mockingbird? Might he not have been at her side reading the editor's letters and helping her along?
 
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matthew mckeon

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Maybe her editor was the novelist? How voluminous were the letters between the correspondents? And where was Capote when she "wrote" Mockingbird? Might he not have been at her side reading the editor's letters and helping her along?
Have you definitely, 100%, ruled out UFOs? If you're interested in the writing of "Mockingbird" there is a detailed description in "Furious Hours."
 

DaveBrt

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Started Gordon, The Rules of the Game, Jutland and British Naval Command. While the focus is on the decisions in the battle, its major addition to the subject is the study of the admirals as they grew and developed in the decades before the war and how this interaction affected their decision-making. I've only ready 35 of the 625 pages (yes, I read the Forward), but it looks like a good one.
 

J. D. Stevens

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Recently completed "Sea of Mud" by Gregg J. Dimmick. This book is an archaeological investigation about the retreat of the Mexican army after the Texian army under General Sam Houston dealt a stunning defeat to General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna at San Jacinto. Forty-five miles to the west, an army of over 2,500 led by Santa Anna's second in command, General Vicente Filisola was located on the Brazos River. Fearing for his life, the captured Santa Anna ordered General Filisola to retreat, but the luck of the Mexican army went from bad to worse as torrential rains began to fall for days on end, turning the Texas prairie between the flooded Bernard and Colorado Rivers into un Mar de Lodo or a sea of mud. It took two weeks for the wagons, cannon, horses, mules, and men bogged down in the mud to move 45 miles to a crossing on the Colorado River.

For those interested in a little known episode in Texas history, this book of 350 pages provides a detailed description of the state of the Mexican army and it's officers, locations of camps, routes of march, maps, and pictures of artifacts found. Extensive notes give translated details about diaries, letters, and memoirs written by those in the Mexican army during the retreat.
 


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