1. Welcome to the CivilWarTalk, a forum for questions and discussions about the American Civil War! Become a member today for full access to all of our resources, it's fast, simple, and absolutely free!
Dismiss Notice
Join and Become a Patron at CivilWarTalk!
Support this site with a monthly or yearly subscription! Active Patrons get to browse the site Ad free!
START BY JOINING NOW!

What leaders did after the war . . .

Discussion in 'Civil War History - General Discussion' started by RobertP, Jun 5, 2018.

  1. RobertP

    RobertP Major

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    8,837
    Location:
    on the long winding road
    It’s interesting to me what high ranking military leaders did after the Civil War was over and how they handled a return to civilian life. Everyone knows of course that Grant became POTUS and Lee a College President. More than a few got involved with railroads and in the growing Insurance business, and some ran for office. But what about the majority of the Generals, Admirals and prominent Colonels? Where were they employed and how well did they adjust to relatively mundane lives after the experience of commanding in the most stressful conditions one can imagine?
     

  2. (Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
  3. bankerpapaw

    bankerpapaw 2nd Lieutenant

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2007
    Messages:
    3,143
    Location:
    Rome, Georgia
    Excellent post!! Someone a lot more qualified than me will have to answer that question.
     
  4. diane

    diane Brev. Brig. Gen'l

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2010
    Messages:
    21,023
    Location:
    State of Jefferson
    Forrest's right-hand man for a number of his best battles was Gen Tyree Harris Bell. He left Tennessee ten years after the war because he couldn't get back on his feet there, and headed for the Fresno valley in California. He took up wheat farming, did very well with it. His daughter helped begin a chapter of the UDC in California and his son, who served during the CW, came out with his family in the late 1880s and began an SCV chapter. The family was very active in these organizations, which is why there is a Confederate cemetery in Sanger, CA. The general himself died in New Orleans in 1902 on his way to attend a veterans' reunion but was brought back to California.
     
  5. amweiner

    amweiner Sergeant Major Trivia Game Winner

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2017
    Messages:
    2,487
    Location:
    Monterey, CA
    I always had a soft spot for Elisha Hunt Rhodes, admittedly because of the Ken Burns series, but I enjoyed reading his journal as well. This guy rose from private to colonel of the 2nd Rhode Island Infantry, and after the war went into business as well as maintaining a strong involvement with the GAR.
    https://acws.co.uk/archives-biography-hunt_rhodes
     
  6. diane

    diane Brev. Brig. Gen'l

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2010
    Messages:
    21,023
    Location:
    State of Jefferson
    There's Frank C Armstrong, a general who had the very curious distinction of having fought on both sides during the war, and - because of a clerical error - for a few days on both sides at the same time! He worked for the Overland Mail Service in Texas after the war - the stage coach version of the Pony Express - and as an Indian agent and assistant commissioner of Indian affairs. He had been raised on the Choctaw agency and was well experienced with Indians, serving in several other government capacities concerning them.
     
  7. amweiner

    amweiner Sergeant Major Trivia Game Winner

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2017
    Messages:
    2,487
    Location:
    Monterey, CA
  8. RobertP

    RobertP Major

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    8,837
    Location:
    on the long winding road
    My great grandfather’s brigade commander was Claudius Sears; Mass. born and appointed to West Point from New York. He resigned from the Army in 1842 and began a teaching career, first in Holly Springs, Miss., then at U. of La. (Tulane), then Louisiana Seminary where he undoubtedly knew Wm. Sherman.

    He was a Captain in the 17th Miss. from 1st Bull Run through the Antietam Campaign, then promoted to Colonet of the 46th Miss. in the Western Theater. After exchange from his Vicksburg capture he was promoted to BG and led his brigade in the Atlanta, Franklin and Nashville Campaigns, where he had a leg shot off. After the war he taught Mathmatics and Engineering at Ole Miss for 24 years. He is buried in Oxford, Miss.
     
  9. WilliamH

    WilliamH Private

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2016
    Messages:
    208
    Location:
    Point Lookout
    upload_2018-6-5_16-22-25.gif

    I always liked the story of Fighting Joe Wheeler putting the uniform back on and fighting the Spanish. Even if he did get a little confused from time to time on whom he was fighting… “During the excitement of the battle, Wheeler supposedly called out "Let's go, boys! We've got the **** Yankees on the run again!" –Wiki Joe Wheeler page.
     
  10. Ole Miss

    Ole Miss Sergeant

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2017
    Messages:
    571
    Location:
    North Mississippi
    Claudius Wistar Sears, West Point graduate and native of Massachusetts, had been teaching mathematics at Tulane University prior to the ACW. He chose to serve in the Confederate army rising to the rank of Brigadier general at war’s end.

    He was captured and released at Vicksburg and was recaptured after the Battle of Nashville while recovering from the loss of his leg. After recovering from his wounds, Sears moved to Oxford, MS where he taught mathematics & civil engineering from 1865 to 1889. He passed away in 1891 and is buried in St. Peter’s cemetery in Oxford not far from L. Q. C. Lamar.
    Regards
    David
     
  11. donna

    donna Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

    Joined:
    May 12, 2010
    Messages:
    26,575
    Location:
    Kentucky
    Confederate General Basil Duke moved to Louisville, Ky. after war. He practiced law. His main client was the Louisville and Nashville Railroad. He was author of 3 books and wrote for several magazines. He help found the Louisville Filson Club, Historical Club. He was appointed a Commissioner of Shiloh National Military Park by Teddy Roosevelt. They became good friends.
     
  12. cash

    cash Brev. Brig. Gen'l

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2005
    Messages:
    31,725
    Location:
    Right here.
     
    rebel brit and Zella like this.
  13. RobertP

    RobertP Major

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    8,837
    Location:
    on the long winding road
    Richard Anderson, Major General ANV. From South Carolina, he was a professional soldier who resigned his commission in the US Army at the outbreak of war. He was made a BG in early ‘62 and promoted to MG as a result of a strong performance in the 7 Days. Anderson is well known for the all night march from the Wilderness to Spottsylvania, barely beating the Federals to that critical crossroads and saving the day for Lee.

    After the war he went back to S.C. and tried growing cotton, at which he failed. He was associated with a railroad for 10 years before being fired. In 1879 he became the State Phosphate Inspector, the same year that he later died at 57.

    One of Lee’s best Division commanders in the mighty ANV reduced to a Phosphate Inspector. That had to be a tough pill to swallow.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2018
    Rebforever, amweiner, donna and 5 others like this.
  14. Stony

    Stony Captain Trivia Game Winner

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2013
    Messages:
    5,245
    Location:
    Eastern NC
    William Lamb (7 September 1835 – 23 March 1909) was an officer in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. He is best remembered for his role in commanding the Confederate garrison at Fort Fisher. In January 1865 Alfred Terry led a renewed attack against the fort and despite a heroic defense by Lamb and his garrison the fort was captured and Lamb was grievously wounded. He eventually recovered, becoming from 1880 to 1886 the mayor of Norfolk, Virginia as his father and grandfather had been before him. Initially a member of the Democratic Party, he joined the Republican Party in 1882. In 1900 he was made a Knight of the Order of Vasa, for his services as consul for Sweden and Norway. He died in Norfolk on 23 March 1909 and is buried there in Elmwood Cemetery. His personal papers are held by the Special Collections Research Center at the College of William & Mary.
     
    Rebforever, amweiner, donna and 5 others like this.
  15. Stony

    Stony Captain Trivia Game Winner

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2013
    Messages:
    5,245
    Location:
    Eastern NC
    James Henry Lane (July 28, 1833 – September 21, 1907) was a university professor and Confederate general in the American Civil War. Lane was born in Mathews Court House, Virginia. He graduated from the Virginia Military Institute (VMI) in 1854 and received a master's degree from the University of Virginia in 1857. He was a professor of mathematics at VMI and then of natural philosophy at the North Carolina Military Institute until the start of the Civil War. Lane joined the Confederate Army and was commissioned as a major in the 1st North Carolina Volunteers on May 11, 1861. He participated in the Battle of Big Bethel and was made lieutenant colonel.
    Lane returned to academic life, as professor of civil engineering and commerce at Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College (VAMC)—founded in 1872, name changed to Virginia Polytechnic Institute (VPI) in 1896—and from 1881 until his death, professor of civil engineering at Alabama Polytechnic Institute, now known as Auburn University.[2]
    Lane served as the first Commandant of the Corps of Cadets at VAMC. Before resigning, he had an argument with President Charles Minor, who wanted the college to eliminate strict military restrictions
     
    Rebforever, amweiner, donna and 3 others like this.
  16. USS ALASKA

    USS ALASKA Sergeant Major

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2016
    Messages:
    2,022
    While not a combatant commander, James Bulloch was considered a secret agent and was not included in the general amnesty that came after the Civil War. He stayed in the UK and became a successful cotton merchant. Two of his relatives became US Presidents, (one of whom is pictured in an above post).

    Cheers,
    USS ALASKA
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2018
  17. USS ALASKA

    USS ALASKA Sergeant Major

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2016
    Messages:
    2,022
    Rear Admiral and acting Brigadier General Raphael Semmes...

    "...worked as a professor of philosophy and literature at Louisiana State Seminary (now Louisiana State University), as a county judge, and then as a newspaper editor; his controversial military service was always a factor in forcing his job changes. Semmes later returned to Mobile and resumed his legal career. In October 1866, Semmes was offered a position as Professor of Moral Philosophy and English Literature at the Louisiana State Seminary. The position paid $3,000 per year. Semmes assumed his position at the university on January 1, 1867. His fellow faculty members described him as "dignified and easy to talk with". His teaching method in classes was one that incorporated mainly formal lectures, and very little discussion. (This comment made me smile - if you have read, or tried to read, his book you'll understand) In May 1867, Semmes resigned from the university to take over as editor of a newspaper, the Memphis Bulletin. He defended both his actions at sea and the political actions of the southern states in his 1869 'Memoirs of Service Afloat During The War Between the States'. The book was viewed as one of the most cogent but bitter defenses written about the South's "Lost Cause." In 1871 the citizens of Mobile presented Semmes with what became known as the Raphael Semmes House, and it remained his residence until his untimely death in 1877 from complications that followed food poisoning from eating contaminated shrimp. Semmes was then interred in Mobile's Old Catholic Cemetery."

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raphael_Semmes

    Cheers,
    USS ALASKA
     
    amweiner, donna, rebel brit and 3 others like this.
  18. ucvrelics.com

    ucvrelics.com 1st Lieutenant Forum Host

    Joined:
    May 7, 2016
    Messages:
    4,005
    Location:
    Alabama
    Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest. President SM&M railroad. He ended up rebuilding some of the same RR that he fought for during the CW and was destroyed by the Union army.
     
    amweiner, donna, rebel brit and 3 others like this.
  19. diane

    diane Brev. Brig. Gen'l

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2010
    Messages:
    21,023
    Location:
    State of Jefferson
    Sometimes I think he had a particularly hard time going back to being a farmer after being the Wizard of the Saddle. One letter he wrote to a friend was regular farm talk about the weather and the corn crop...sure a far cry from the excitement and activity of the war. A lot of these guys had a hard time going back to who they were before and the West became full of these wound-up ex-soldiers who were looking for that excitement. Not many generals became famous outlaws and marshals but a lot of regular soldiers sure did! Forrest was too attached to his family to pull up roots, though, and felt a responsibility to the men he had recruited and led in battle. If he'd been younger and less busted up, I wouldn't be surprised if he had gone West!
     
    amweiner, donna, RobertP and 3 others like this.
  20. Booner

    Booner Sergeant Major

    Joined:
    May 4, 2015
    Messages:
    2,249
    Location:
    Boonville, MO
    PTSD perhaps?
     
  21. rebel brit

    rebel brit First Sergeant

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2013
    Messages:
    1,139
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    What a great idea for a thread, many thanks @RobertP .
    I've just spent a very enjoyable hour watching the video posted by @cash .:thumbsup::thumbsup:
     

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)

Share This Page


(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)