What is this? What Kind of Gun?

lelliott19

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Can anyone tell what kind of gun this soldier is holding? I do not own the image, so I've blacked it out except for the gun. Due to coverage of the mat and preserver, that's all of it that is visible. Any input and/or info appreciated.
1613190987908.png
 

lelliott19

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Thanks. Do you know the yardage range on the ladder sight for that model? It looks really long.
 

steamboater

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It looks the correct length, which was marked up to 900 yards. I recently happened upon a YOUTUBE vid that showed a guy burning black powder with his, at a target of 300 yards. The muzzle would flash, then a second later you could hear the big slug, 70 caliber, smack the hillside that held the target. This was Britain's primary rifle during the Crimean War.
 

toot

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why are they always printed in reverse from the glass plate? it seems to happen a lot of the time?
 

Rhea Cole

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why are they always printed in reverse from the glass plate? it seems to happen a lot of the time?
That is a good question. The image focused on a plate using the simple optics of those cameras was flopped left to right. It was also upside down, which was easily corrected. You see the same kind of flop in plates used to print on paper, everything reads from right to left.
 

steamboater

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why are they always printed in reverse from the glass plate? it seems to happen a lot of the time?
"It seems to happen a lot of the time". It happens all of the time. If you use a film camera, by the laws of optics, the image is made on the film upside down and backwards. For the darkroom operator, the film would have to be flipped over to produce a positive image. The paper doesn't know right-side-up from upside-down, so someone might have to rotate the photo to view it in the correct orientation.
With an ambrotype negative, to make a positive image package to put into a frame or case, the operator would have to flip the emulsion side to the back. This would put the surface of the protective cover glass and the non-emulsion side of the image glass in contact with each other. This wasn't always done, as the sensitive emulsion would be exposed to abrasion, finger prints, etc.
 

Rhea Cole

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Well, no luck. I tried yesterday and this morning. It tells me that page is not accessible. Maybe it's because I have never been on facebook. I don't even have a smart phone. Any suggestions?
I asked my tech savvy history loving granddaughter what she would suggest... apparently, if you crank hard enough, you could generate enough power to attach a small screen to your phone. (;-)
 

OldSarge79

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I asked my tech savvy history loving granddaughter what she would suggest... apparently, if you crank hard enough, you could generate enough power to attach a small screen to your phone. (;-)
Hey, I'll try almost anything. I love living in the dark ages, but sometimes it has its drawbacks.

If nothing else, if there is an indication as to what unit that soldier was in, that, in itself, would be helpful. Would still love to see the photo though.
 

Rhea Cole

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"It seems to happen a lot of the time". It happens all of the time. If you use a film camera, by the laws of optics, the image is made on the film upside down and backwards. For the darkroom operator, the film would have to be flipped over to produce a positive image. The paper doesn't know right-side-up from upside-down, so someone might have to rotate the photo to view it in the correct orientation.
With an ambrotype negative, to make a positive image package to put into a frame or case, the operator would have to flip the emulsion side to the back. This would put the surface of the protective cover glass and the non-emulsion side of the image glass in contact with each other. This wasn't always done, as the sensitive emulsion would be exposed to abrasion, finger prints, etc.
For those unfamiliar with the state of the art during the 1860’s a distinction needs to be made clear. Early photographs were exposed & developed on pieces of metal or paper. It was a one off. All of those images were flopped left to right. With the advent of glass negatives, it became possible to not only print multiple images, but the left to right flop could be corrected.
 

steamboater

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Hey, I'll try almost anything. I love living in the dark ages, but sometimes it has its drawbacks.

If nothing else, if there is an indication as to what unit that soldier was in, that, in itself, would be helpful. Would still love to see the photo though.
This was in an auction yesterday. A 1-6 plate ambrotype of a Confederate private, darker gray shell jacket, no ID or provenance. For a CS image, very sharp, condition 9. It went for $2500, which totals $3125 with buyers premium. I can probably get a copy to you if you can supply an email address.

How did you like the video I mentioned?
 

OldSarge79

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This was in an auction yesterday. A 1-6 plate ambrotype of a Confederate private, darker gray shell jacket, no ID or provenance. For a CS image, very sharp, condition 9. It went for $2500, which totals $3125 with buyers premium. I can probably get a copy to you if you can supply an email address.

How did you like the video I mentioned?
I'll do that in a PM.

The video was fantastic, in more ways than one.
The musket he fired in the video is one that I found for him, for sale on-line. He had been looking for one for years. We were acquainted on British Militaria Forums, but I never knew his full name or what he looked like. So, the whole thing was very interesting. Really neat to see a Pattern '51 fired. Thanks for pointing it out to me. He has authored a couple of reference books on British muskets and ammunition in that era.
 

lelliott19

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toot

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"It seems to happen a lot of the time". It happens all of the time. If you use a film camera, by the laws of optics, the image is made on the film upside down and backwards. For the darkroom operator, the film would have to be flipped over to produce a positive image. The paper doesn't know right-side-up from upside-down, so someone might have to rotate the photo to view it in the correct orientation.
With an ambrotype negative, to make a positive image package to put into a frame or case, the operator would have to flip the emulsion side to the back. This would put the surface of the protective cover glass and the non-emulsion side of the image glass in contact with each other. This wasn't always done, as the sensitive emulsion would be exposed to abrasion, finger prints, etc.
thank you for the come back.
 
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