What is Slavery ..... for children

SWMODave

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Courtesy Google Books
(taken from the above children's book)
Just here, I must tell you that the slaves were blacks, or negroes, who had first been brought to this country from Africa, in 1619, by the Dutch, and sold to the Virginia planters. At first, the planters bought them out of pity, as they were badly treated by the Dutch. But after a time it was found that the negroes worked well in the corn and tobacco fields, and that they made money for their masters.

Many men at the North were sea - going men, and they soon found out that, by sailing over the ocean to Africa and catching the blacks, they could sell them at a great profit to themselves. This they did, and men both at the North and South bought them, though, even then, there were some people at the South who thought it wrong to buy and sell human beings.

In the State of Georgia it was for a time against the law to hold negro slaves.

After a while, it was found that the climate at the North was too cold for the to thrive. It did not pay the men at the North to keep them, and so they were sold to the Southern planters.

In the South, the climate was hot, like that of their native Africa, so they did well in that sunny land.

In 1808, it was made unlawful to bring any more slaves from Africa to the United States. The people at the South were glad that the trade in slaves was stopped, but the Northern traders were of course sorry that they could make no more money in that way.

When the negroes were first brought from Africa, they were heathen savages; but, after a few years, they learned the speech an customs of the whites; and, more than all, the worship of the true God. In thinking of this, we have to admit that slavery must have been permitted by the Lord in order to bring a heathen people out of darkness into the light of the Gospel.

There were now four millions of negroes in the South . There was great love between the blacks and their masters, as we have seen when John Brown tried to get the former to rise up and slay the whites.

For years, there had been a feeling in the North that it was wrong to own slaves, and some of the people began to hate the South and to try to crush it.

The South felt that they owned the slaves under the law , or Constitution of the United States, and that they ought to be let alone.

They also claimed that the slaves, as a class, were better treated than any other working people in the world. They, moreover, said that the Southern States had a perfect right to go out of the Union, if they wished , and set up a government for themselves. This the North denied ; and thus they quarreled about the rights of States, and slavery, and other things, until they began to think of war.

(the OP adds no comment other than this author would have made a great politician. She has obviously mastered the art of 'the spin'.)
Mods - this probably belongs in SlaveryTalk but I can't seem to locate a post button in that forum so please move at your discretion.
 

Georgia

Sergeant
View attachment 382134
Courtesy Google Books
(taken from the above children's book)
Just here, I must tell you that the slaves were blacks, or negroes, who had first been brought to this country from Africa, in 1619, by the Dutch, and sold to the Virginia planters. At first, the planters bought them out of pity, as they were badly treated by the Dutch. But after a time it was found that the negroes worked well in the corn and tobacco fields, and that they made money for their masters.

Many men at the North were sea - going men, and they soon found out that, by sailing over the ocean to Africa and catching the blacks, they could sell them at a great profit to themselves. This they did, and men both at the North and South bought them, though, even then, there were some people at the South who thought it wrong to buy and sell human beings.

In the State of Georgia it was for a time against the law to hold negro slaves.

After a while, it was found that the climate at the North was too cold for the to thrive. It did not pay the men at the North to keep them, and so they were sold to the Southern planters.

In the South, the climate was hot, like that of their native Africa, so they did well in that sunny land.

In 1808, it was made unlawful to bring any more slaves from Africa to the United States. The people at the South were glad that the trade in slaves was stopped, but the Northern traders were of course sorry that they could make no more money in that way.

When the negroes were first brought from Africa, they were heathen savages; but, after a few years, they learned the speech an customs of the whites; and, more than all, the worship of the true God. In thinking of this, we have to admit that slavery must have been permitted by the Lord in order to bring a heathen people out of darkness into the light of the Gospel.

There were now four millions of negroes in the South . There was great love between the blacks and their masters, as we have seen when John Brown tried to get the former to rise up and slay the whites.

For years, there had been a feeling in the North that it was wrong to own slaves, and some of the people began to hate the South and to try to crush it.

The South felt that they owned the slaves under the law , or Constitution of the United States, and that they ought to be let alone.

They also claimed that the slaves, as a class, were better treated than any other working people in the world. They, moreover, said that the Southern States had a perfect right to go out of the Union, if they wished , and set up a government for themselves. This the North denied ; and thus they quarreled about the rights of States, and slavery, and other things, until they began to think of war.

(the OP adds no comment other than this author would have made a great politician. She has obviously mastered the art of 'the spin'.)
Mods - this probably belongs in SlaveryTalk but I can't seem to locate a post button in that forum so please move at your discretion.
The State Of Georgia books - which were used for instruction in schools along with textbooks for colleges ( believe I recall Momma saying at UGA in ‘54-‘56 she had to take a Georgia history class to graduate) were very kindly written in such a way as to smooth over the huge issues of owning and exploiting fellow humans.

It’s a travesty that these subjects are not taught in many schools. And, it’s a difficult subject to try to do justice to when you have only 30 minutes of time to explain the sugar triangle, hearth cooking and the differences between an Artisan apprentice, indentured servants and the enslaved.

I feel strongly that there are parts of this story which I am not able to discuss - it needs to come from a descendant if the enslaved instead of me. However, I don’t want to lose an opportunity to educate the children visiting the plantation where I volunteer.
There is a fine line between impressing upon the children the severity of the times and not giving them nightmares.
 

Georgia

Sergeant
Children can be a lot tougher than we think. They are certainly a lot smarter now then we were at a younger age.

And who are we afraid of giving nightmares? Children or ourselves?

"And the truth shall set them free" is a motto we should endorse fully, warts and all.
I agree with you in the resilience of children and their abilities to accept and process knowledge. I have gotten asked very thoughtful questions from some of the younger students who visit the plantation.
My personal issues with explaining about enslavement are that the children don’t arrive with a background in the subject and the teachers are not going to be instructing them on the subject. So, if all they get is my few words on the subject, I fear that’s a disservice to them. I’m merely portraying the indentured cook in the detached kitchen and the subject comes up because we discuss the Sugar triangle.
I find it’s critical that areas of our history are not glossed over or ever forgotten. And, I think it’s a travesty that the education system is not actively educating classes on the Civil War and specifically about enslavement. I realize it’s a subject that is uncomfortable. But, we need to set that aside and educate these students on their country’s history- as you stated, “warts and all.”

Concerning the nightmares- I think there are sadly enough for us all.
 
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mo
Kinda curious how much time is spent on slavery in world history? Would seem as relevant as it is in US History, and would be very relevant to setting an actual context for it in US history.
 

Georgia

Sergeant
Kinda curious how much time is spent on slavery in world history? Would seem as relevant as it is in US History, and would be very relevant to setting an actual context for it in US history.
Very good inquiry- I don’t believe it was discussed at all in my undergraduate History classes and I know for certain it wasn’t discussed in my high school AP History classes. Granted- this was the dark ages of the mid to latter ‘80’s...

It would be a perfect tie in to a World History class, in my opinion.
 
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mo
It's always struck me odd in world history most the "great" civilizations utilized slavery.......and they are still considered "great". Most all the great wonders of the world and architectural feats were done utilizing it as well.

The major powers colonizing the new world used it, used it longer, and are responsible for introducing it to the New World.....yet it mainly appears only the US gets demonized, always seemed a bit odd.
 

Georgia

Sergeant
It's always struck me odd in world history most the "great" civilizations utilized slavery.......and they are still considered "great". Most all the great wonders of the world and architectural feats were done utilizing it as well.

The major powers colonizing the new world used it, used it longer, and are responsible for introducing it to the New World.....yet it mainly appears only the US gets demonized, always seemed a bit odd.
I do realize that there are sadly enslaved persons today in the world. But, I’m thinking the reason the US gets brought up the most is that it happened the shortest time ago to now. We’re the most recent country which utilized the enslaved for their own benefits.

It’s the freshest on the minds of most.

Now, let me share an anecdote which we experienced year before last with Vacation Bible School.
There is a section of the curriculum that a person tells via story time. There can be crafts involved or role play. But, basically, it’s an adult relaying a story which is helpful to further instilling the basis of the curriculum.

Ok, we had our VBS in late July- early August and many other churches had been having their VBS earlier in the summer. We were following an online message board to pick up extra hints or issues that had come out so we’d be good to go with ours.

One of the stories was discussed slaves and the slaves working for their master and doing work. I’ve linked an article discussing the specifics for anyone interested in reading more.

But, this role play between Egyptians and Israelites was enough to have children being pulled from the VBS all over the country.

This increased sensitivity of issues not even involved with the US and the enslaved are enough to cause this much of a national uproar.

After this happened, I realized more so why the Civil War and discussing the enslaved are not done- nobody wants the possible parents showing up and threatening litigation.

Personally, I believe there is a correct and a non correct way to discuss this time in our History. But, by not discussing it and taking the easy way out is doing much more harm than good.
Until we can talk about this subject and answer questions and explain the wrongs and how long it took the US to realize this, the more damage is being done.


*** Disclaimer: this is just my opinion and is not meant to call any one person or group out as it is merely an observation I have made. ***

I’m not the PC police, quite obviously. However, I will admit that I was personally taken aback that on this forum the incorrect choice of the words “slave”, “slavery,” “Master” etc. is readily written and used. It’s written this way on the forum sections, etc. and it’s the terminology of choice of many here who discuss the issue.


One does not use the word “slave” or “slavery” any longer as to do so is a harmful and insensitive word choice. To be considered correct, one should use the word “enslaved.” This denotes the fact that the person was placed into bondage against their will.
The first article is a generalization of vocabulary words which would be used within the classroom setting. The second article does a good job articulating the reasoning behind making these word choice changes.


It does take some time to adjust your mind, but once it clicks, it doesn’t sound out of sorts.

As a white person, it’s a small way that I choose to utilize specific word choices which are demonstrative of the situation. And, to “enslave” someone does make a clearer visual and reminds us of what was happening only 160 or so years ago. It’s a way I choose to accept my responsibility to educate others so they will hopefully never let this time in our history be forgotten. If we push it down and don’t discuss it- well, then that’s when I fear the worst.
 

Viper21

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I do realize that there are sadly enslaved persons today in the world. But, I’m thinking the reason the US gets brought up the most is that it happened the shortest time ago to now. We’re the most recent country which utilized the enslaved for their own benefits.

It’s the freshest on the minds of most.
Uh.... not exactly. Many places in the world held onto slavery longer than the United States did. Some MUCH longer.

Here's an abolition map (wiki):

1920px-Slavery_abolition.svg.png


 
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Location
mo
I do realize that there are sadly enslaved persons today in the world. But, I’m thinking the reason the US gets brought up the most is that it happened the shortest time ago to now. We’re the most recent country which utilized the enslaved for their own benefits.

It’s the freshest on the minds of most.

Now, let me share an anecdote which we experienced year before last with Vacation Bible School.
There is a section of the curriculum that a person tells via story time. There can be crafts involved or role play. But, basically, it’s an adult relaying a story which is helpful to further instilling the basis of the curriculum.

Ok, we had our VBS in late July- early August and many other churches had been having their VBS earlier in the summer. We were following an online message board to pick up extra hints or issues that had come out so we’d be good to go with ours.

One of the stories was discussed slaves and the slaves working for their master and doing work. I’ve linked an article discussing the specifics for anyone interested in reading more.

But, this role play between Egyptians and Israelites was enough to have children being pulled from the VBS all over the country.

This increased sensitivity of issues not even involved with the US and the enslaved are enough to cause this much of a national uproar.

After this happened, I realized more so why the Civil War and discussing the enslaved are not done- nobody wants the possible parents showing up and threatening litigation.

Personally, I believe there is a correct and a non correct way to discuss this time in our History. But, by not discussing it and taking the easy way out is doing much more harm than good.
Until we can talk about this subject and answer questions and explain the wrongs and how long it took the US to realize this, the more damage is being done.


*** Disclaimer: this is just my opinion and is not meant to call any one person or group out as it is merely an observation I have made. ***

I’m not the PC police, quite obviously. However, I will admit that I was personally taken aback that on this forum the incorrect choice of the words “slave”, “slavery,” “Master” etc. is readily written and used. It’s written this way on the forum sections, etc. and it’s the terminology of choice of many here who discuss the issue.


One does not use the word “slave” or “slavery” any longer as to do so is a harmful and insensitive word choice. To be considered correct, one should use the word “enslaved.” This denotes the fact that the person was placed into bondage against their will.
The first article is a generalization of vocabulary words which would be used within the classroom setting. The second article does a good job articulating the reasoning behind making these word choice changes.


It does take some time to adjust your mind, but once it clicks, it doesn’t sound out of sorts.

As a white person, it’s a small way that I choose to utilize specific word choices which are demonstrative of the situation. And, to “enslave” someone does make a clearer visual and reminds us of what was happening only 160 or so years ago. It’s a way I choose to accept my responsibility to educate others so they will hopefully never let this time in our history be forgotten. If we push it down and don’t discuss it- well, then that’s when I fear the worst.
I suspect both the reason the US is generally demonized more then other countries in world history......is the same reason they argue these verbal semantics, and is more modern agendas then anything with history.

As that slavery existed well past the US and 1865 is also generally ignored in our presentation of slavery......
 

Georgia

Sergeant
Uh.... not exactly. Many places in the world held onto slavery longer than the United States did. Some MUCH longer.

Here's an abolition map (wiki):

View attachment 382281

Thank you for making this correction as it was very warranted. My mind was thinking England and then us and we were the last of the lot. My poor mistake.

As to why we are the ones which having those enslaved still comes up frequently- do you think it could be because in general, the US was the place all aspired to immigrate to? And, we still had an incomplete healing of those events?
Granted, I don’t look for stories of the enslaved in Saudi Arabia. But, it appears from your map ( it’s a sad map for the content but a very interesting one for the same reason.) that I should have been able to find stories about the enslaved from there as recently as a little over 20 years ago. And, Russia- what a surprise they were one of the earliest to finish away with it!
Again, thank you for sharing this very helpful map.

Why do you think the US is a place where enslavement is being discussed and not discussed at the same time? It’s not being taught in many schools - I’m hoping others may state if their children have studied this era and if they would say the state where the instruction took place. But, as evidenced by this forum, a large portion of the discussions of enslavement appear to be happening within locations with specific interests in the Civil War. To remedy this disproportionate discussion, the school systems should be adding a dialogue to discuss the use of enslavement in this and other countries into their curriculum.
 
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Viper21

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Thank you for making this correction as it was very warranted. My mind was thinking England and then us and we were the last of the lot. My poor mistake.

As to why we are the ones which having those enslaved still comes up frequently- do you think it could be because in general, the US was the place all aspired to immigrate to? And, we still had an incomplete healing of those events?
Granted, I don’t look for stories of the enslaved in Saudi Arabia. But, it appears from your map ( it’s a sad map for the content but a very interesting one for the same reason.) that I should have been able to find stories about the enslaved from there as recently as a little over 20 years ago. And, Russia- what a surprise they were one of the earliest to finish away with it!
Again, thank you for sharing this very helpful map.

Why do you think the US is a place where enslavement is being discussed and not discussed at the same time? It’s not being taught in many schools - I’m hoping others may state if their children have studied this era and if they would say the state where the instruction took place. But, as evidenced by this forum, it’s a large portion of the discussions in locations such as this forum.
I believe the reason is modern politics. I would love to share my perspective on that with you but, it's against the forum rules. Those type of discussions get too ugly, too quickly. For the overall benefit of the forum, they aren't allowed.
 

dlofting

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I suspect both the reason the US is generally demonized more then other countries in world history......is the same reason they argue these verbal semantics, and is more modern agendas then anything with history.

As that slavery existed well past the US and 1865 is also generally ignored in our presentation of slavery......
Demonization of the US comes from within. In political discussions with people outside the US I have never heard slavery mentioned.
 

Georgia

Sergeant
I suspect both the reason the US is generally demonized more then other countries in world history......is the same reason they argue these verbal semantics, and is more modern agendas then anything with history.

As that slavery existed well past the US and 1865 is also generally ignored in our presentation of slavery......
Valid points- I think the desire for semantics may even be a result of not doing all that could be done to help educate, teach trades and other areas of help to the newly freed enslaved when the Civil War was over. There were some amazing locations which did educate- but, they seem few and far between. I’m not sure what the real and complete answer would be; but, I don’t believe enough was done to prepare those who were now faced with locating lodging, food, clothing and work. Because there was so much which still happened to keep the newly enslaved “in place” or “down” the word choice may be a first step of acknowledging the system of enslaving.
As any of us know what it was like stepping out of the house on our own for the first time there was trepidation. But, to have no background, no support system, surrounded by those who had enslaved you, etc. I can’t even comprehend the joy of being freed and the worry of “making life work.”

I think the facts that others were enslaved long after 1865 is greatly ignored. But, if we can’t even have a classroom discussion about our own history which involved enslaving others, it would seem almost hopeless to think we could talk about other countries and their enslavement policies. ( unless it was used as a deflection tactic to make us feel better...)

The only thing that I think most might agree to is that it’s a difficult situation. I question myself constantly, as a result.
 

wausaubob

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Generally, the slaves were people who were not allowed to grow up and live their own lives. They were treated like children for the entire lives, but made to work.
In the United States, there was slavery, but it was different in every place and on every farm.
 
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mo
Demonization of the US comes from within. In political discussions with people outside the US I have never heard slavery mentioned.
That's why I tend to think it's not simply historical presentation driving it's presentation.........or it would be treated the same as in world history......where it isn't some constant talking point.

It would seem to me if we aren't presenting US slavery with roughly the same context and presentation that slavery through history and within other great civilizations are.......we aren't really giving it a balanced historical presentation.
 
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Quaama

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I think slavery is discussed outside of the USA but the term is now a broader concept. Earlier this year our Prime Minister said "there was no slavery in Australia" in an interview [link] and a number of people took issue with that comment. People cite things such as convicts, black-birding (island peoples bought to work on [mostly] sugar cane farms) and various practices involving Aborigines as being slavery although it was not the same as the legally sanctioned slavery in the USA.
On the map provided above, slavery was said to end in Australia in 1834. Technically, there was never slavery in Australia although an argument can be made under current definitions that there was and it continued beyond 1834. It looks like they arrived at 1834 for the Australian continent because at the time Australia was not a nation but separate colonies under British law and thus they fall under the Slavery Abolition Act 1833 (like Canada) and are deemed free from slavery after its enactment.
 

Georgia

Sergeant
That's why I tend to think it's not simply historical presentation driving it's presentation.........or it would be treated the same as in world history......where it isn't some constant talking point.

It would seem to me if we aren't presenting US slavery with roughly the same context and presentation that slavery through history and within other great civilizations are.......we aren't really giving it a balanced historical presentation.
Exactly. By not discussing it at all, we are doing a horrible disservice to future generations.
 
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mo
Exactly. By not discussing it at all, we are doing a horrible disservice to future generations.
Not sure how. How exactly has the presentation of world history been a horrible disservice? If you think slavery in every civilization needs to be as big a talking point as it has become in ours..........there will be little time for anything but history classes, which would seem rather absurd.

I would think that simply shows it has become over presented in ours.
 
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Viper21

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Exactly. By not discussing it at all, we are doing a horrible disservice to future generations.
It's an uncomfortable subject. Many folks are incapable of discussing the subject without getting emotionally invested, or charged. Like plenty of other subjects, this brings out the virtue signals, & personal attacks. Lots of folks don't want to have an honest discussion, & plenty of other folks, don't want to subject themselves to such attacks.

It's a discussion tactic that has shown to be very successful. The way to dispel, or discredit an uncomfortable truth, is to claim the higher moral ground. Most of the time, this allows the messenger to be discredited for being immoral ie: racist/white supremacist. Regardless of whether or not, their position/statement is historically accurate.

Sadly, many folks don't want to hear the truth. Instead, they prefer what makes them feel good, or what helps them to achieve their personal, or political goals. Follow enough of these discussions, & you'll see plenty of evidence to back up my assertions.
 

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