What happened to Abraham Lincoln's missing slavery speech?

wbull1

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Thanks for the excerpt. As I read it, Lincoln is responding to attendees proposing violence with a plea to use political means instead. Then he responds to threats of disunion by southerners by counseling them about the "dire consequences" of such an unwise move and warning that the southern states would face a military action if they did.
As I read it he counsels peace to the attendees and counsels peace to southerners threatening disunion. Where is the trashing? Where is the threat of starting a war? He warns of what will happen if and only if the states secede. I see nothing calling for a war. He actually advocates peace.
 

wbull1

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I have always thought there was a parallel between the "lost speech" of Abraham Lincoln who was not on the agenda or the meeting and Martin Luther King, Jr. who was scheduled 16th of the 18 events on the program for the March on Washington on this day in 1963. He was then a minor figure in the Civil Rights movement and assigned to talk just before the organizer and the benediction. King gave a speech about 17 minutes long that was eminently forgettable. He was about to sit down when Mahalia Jackson called out, "Tell us about your dream, Martin." His extemporaneous remarks started with "I have a dream." Both men, relegated to secondary status by others seized the chance to speak from the heart and by doing so claimed a more prominent position and took a major step toward claiming an important role in American history.
 

5fish

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Central Florida
I have always thought there was a parallel between the "lost speech" of Abraham Lincoln who was not on the agenda or the meeting and Martin Luther King, Jr. who was scheduled 16th of the 18 events on the program for the March on Washington on this day in 1963.

I think you are making a big reach or a big leap if you think Lincoln "lost speech" matches Martin Luther King's speech... Lincoln was scheduled to speak last... and Martin did adlib the "I have a dream" but he had given "I have a dream" speech earlier in the year... He was ad-libbing a speech which is always impressive... but Lincoln had a prepared speech if he had adlib we will never know... I think you are being a romantic about history...
 

Lnwlf

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I honestly did not know there was a Lincoln "missing slavery speech". Comes from having a knowledge level a mile wide and an inch deep I reckon. :redface:
 

wbull1

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Jul 26, 2018
I think you are making a big reach or a big leap if you think Lincoln "lost speech" matches Martin Luther King's speech... Lincoln was scheduled to speak last... and Martin did adlib the "I have a dream" but he had given "I have a dream" speech earlier in the year... He was ad-libbing a speech which is always impressive... but Lincoln had a prepared speech if he had adlib we will never know... I think you are being a romantic about history...

As far as I have read, Lincoln was not on the agenda at all and he did not know he would be invited to speak. If you have different information, I would appreciate the reference.
 

5fish

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Aug 26, 2007
Location
Central Florida
Lincoln was not on the agenda at all


Here is this: He speaks from no manuscript.

For over a century, admirers of Abraham Lincoln have debated, speculated and embellished the moment of a speech delivered in Bloomington, Illinois on May 29, 1856—better known as "Lincoln's Lost Speech." For an hour and a half Lincoln held his audience spellbound by the power of his arguments and mesmerized the assembly by his logic and sequence. Reporters faüed to take shorthand notes. Without the aid of manuscript, Lincoln's oratorical effort became his
"Lost Speech."


Here is this: He does announce he will speak at the convention.

This seems unlikely in light of Lincoln's public announcement the day before to make a "most exceUent" speech at the convention. Lincoln's conduct and plans to speak denote a recognized leader rather than the mythological jokester.

Link to the review... https://muse.jhu.edu/article/418720/summary
 
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