What Equipments Were New Recruits Given?

Joined
Jun 7, 2021
Once a man was duly sworn in, what did he receive from the army/navy in terms of supplies? Specifically what type clothing, accouterments, necessary utensils, and useful items did the government supply and what would he have to buy on his own?
 

major bill

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 25, 2012
Are you asking for the official lists or what most soldiers really received? Both the Union and the Confedercy early in the war were short of some items.
 
Joined
Jun 7, 2021
Thanks for the reply! Well both - what were soldiers suppose to get in 1861-1865 and what did their governments actually give them? I've read letters of soldiers from both armies and it seems like they are forever asking family members for clothing, footwear, and medicines that today's soldiers would be supplied with.
Procter & Gamble had a contract to supply soap and candles to the Union army. Was that issued to the regular soldier? How often? Eating utensils are another item I've seen requested in the letters. Was the problem one of supply or delivery? Hope these questions are not too broad. I'm just curious.
 

Dan Kohli

Private
Joined
May 5, 2021
I have not read what the rebels should have been issued. What the federal government should have given their troop I have read in the Readvised regulations of the U.S. Army. What the feds should issue are: forage caps, dress hat/cap (depending on what arm one was a part of.), dress coat, trowsers, flannel shirts, flannel drawers, boots or bootees, stockings, leather stock, great-coat, blanket, fatigue coat, metallic scales, brass insignia, and arm specific items like saddles, knapsacks, stable frocks, and fatigue overalls.
What was or was not actually issued depends on what unit and what time we’re taking about.
Give me some time to read what the confederate regulations says.

Daniel Kohli
 
Joined
Jun 7, 2021
I have not read what the rebels should have been issued. What the federal government should have given their troop I have read in the Readvised regulations of the U.S. Army. What the feds should issue are: forage caps, dress hat/cap (depending on what arm one was a part of.), dress coat, trowsers, flannel shirts, flannel drawers, boots or bootees, stockings, leather stock, great-coat, blanket, fatigue coat, metallic scales, brass insignia, and arm specific items like saddles, knapsacks, stable frocks, and fatigue overalls.
What was or was not actually issued depends on what unit and what time we’re taking about.
Give me some time to read what the confederate regulations says.

Daniel Kohli
Thank you so much. I have been looking online for this info but can't seem to stumble into it. I really appreciate your reply. Metallic scales?? Why would a soldier need that? Flannel shirts and drawers combined with wool uniforms = heat stroke. And so
since there was no such thing as sunblock I guess long sleeves and hats had to suffice. Thanks again.
 

captaindrew

Major
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 13, 2017
Location
Whereabouts Unknown
Thank you so much. I have been looking online for this info but can't seem to stumble into it. I really appreciate your reply. Metallic scales?? Why would a soldier need that? Flannel shirts and drawers combined with wool uniforms = heat stroke. And so
since there was no such thing as sunblock I guess long sleeves and hats had to suffice. Thanks again.
The flannel shirts were a domet flannel that were light weight but scratchey as @#$%. I have some repros I could take a picture of if you'd like. Somewhere there's a chart which lists all the Federal issued items. I'll look for it this evening when I have a minute. The Confederates tried to issue the same things but of course were always fighting shortages of something. The Federals too for that matter in the middle of a hard campaign.
 
Joined
Jun 7, 2021
The flannel shirts were a domet flannel that were light weight but scratchey as @#$%. I have some repros I could take a picture of if you'd like. Somewhere there's a chart which lists all the Federal issued items. I'll look for it this evening when I have a minute. The Confederates tried to issue the same things but of course were always fighting shortages of something. The Federals too for that matter in the middle of a hard campaign.
if the shirts were that bad I don't even want to know how comfortable the drawers would be. A chart and a picture would be great. I did see a reference to the Southern soldiers having cotton drawers issued, which sounds like a good reason for Union soldiers to search the Southerners' knapsacks after a battle.
 

Dan Kohli

Private
Joined
May 5, 2021
Metallic scales
image.jpg
image.jpg
 

Dan Kohli

Private
Joined
May 5, 2021
The scales started out as armor but ended up being part of the dress uniform. As for the drawers, the fabric is a canton flannel, which is not as uncomfortable as one would think.
I forgot to mention that the U.S. Army issued the appropriate arms and associated equipment such as cartridge box’s and slings. Also horses and tents, the types of tents were sibly, commen/A frame, wall tents, hospital, and shelter half.

The 11th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry have a great number of manuals and regulations in their online database.

Daniel Kohli
 
Last edited:

captaindrew

Major
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
Mar 13, 2017
Location
Whereabouts Unknown
if the shirts were that bad I don't even want to know how comfortable the drawers would be. A chart and a picture would be great. I did see a reference to the Southern soldiers having cotton drawers issued, which sounds like a good reason for Union soldiers to search the Southerners' knapsacks after a battle.
The drawers were a different softer material, they are actually fairly comfortable
 
Joined
Jun 7, 2021
The scales started out as armor but ended up being part of the dress uniform. As for the drawers the fabric is a canton flannel, which is not as uncomfortable as one would think.
I forgot to mention that the U.S. Army issued the appropriate arms and associated equipment such as cartridge box’s and slings. Also horses and tents, the types of tents were sibly, commen/A frame, wall tents, hospital, and shelter half.

The 11th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry have a great number of manuals and regulations in their online database.

Daniel Kohli
The online database sounds perfect. Thanks. Fascinating about the armor/scales connection. I suppose that was the basis of epaulettes/shoulder boards too. I love how history just rolls on and the past gets tied to the present.
 
Top