What Did the North and South Have in Common from 1850-1860?


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#42
Both regions were mostly agricultural and most farm work depended on horses, mules and oxen for power. https://www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1860/agriculture/1860b-09.pdf?#
Both sections were supplementing farm production with railroads. But the northern areas were more advance in that regard, because their rivers and canals froze for 4 months of the year, and because the rivers did not connect to the right locations.
 
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#45
Class distinctions openly acknowledged, mostly by those considering themselves elite. And a disinclination by anyone else to recognize worth based on income. OH it was all there and still is but clung to as an increasingly archaic mindset. The latter was instilled if not by all our Founders, then by those citizens who fought our first war. It was unique, this idea that everyone was someone. In Europe, the word ' peasant ' wasn't a swear word and those so described were still pulling their forelocks when the aristocracy rode into view.

Disclaimer is of course worth based on race Edited.
 
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#46
Class distinctions openly acknowledged, mostly by those considering themselves elite. And a disinclination by anyone else to recognize worth based on income. OH it was all there and still is but clung to as an increasingly archaic mindset. The latter was instilled if not by all our Founders, then by those citizens who fought our first war. It was unique, this idea that everyone was someone. In Europe, the word ' peasant ' wasn't a swear word and those so described were still pulling their forelocks when the aristocracy rode into view.

Disclaimer is of course worth based on race Edited.
Thanks for an on-topic contribution to this thread. A very good point. More! More!
 
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#47
I just read about the great fire in Charleston on April 27, 1838. One article states 150 acres in the commercial district were burned including 1,100 buildings

What does this have to do with what the North and South had in common? That same article tells how those "D----d" (my word, not the word in the article) Yankees from Boston and New York sent donations to Charleston to help their brethren recover. yes, those SC Seceshers sure got it right when all they did was accent the differences between the North and South. They sure told the WHOLE story of the events leading up to Secession.

See https://thetandd.com/lifestyles/gre...cle_641d0f19-b92c-5cd9-b3bf-7b44c646fd9e.html
 
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#48
Both sides had dreams in common, some dreamed in both regions of freedom of all men. Others dreamed of the freedom to do what they will unmolested by others. These dreams were not so unalike, all had the freedom of bettering themselves. These were ideas that could not be taken from a person. We thought alike and acted alike, and most wanted to better themselves, some with the land and some with industry.
 
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#49
Men of the both regions fought together in the Mexican-American War.

Coincidentally General Grant who thought the first war with Mexico was unjustified wanted to invade Mexico to topple the French-supported (Confederate-friendly) regime towards the end of the Civil War. He even saw in these military actions a possibility of ending the Civil War through a joint military operation agreement where confederate participants would have the opportunity to take the oath and avoid prosecution. Even post war Grant envisioned a joint force of veterans conducting the operation.

All that to say, a common foe or objective can create common ground.
 
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#50
Men of the both regions fought together in the Mexican-American War.

Coincidentally General Grant who thought the first war with Mexico was unjustified wanted to invade Mexico to topple the French-supported (Confederate-friendly) regime towards the end of the Civil War. He even saw in these military actions a possibility of ending the Civil War through a joint military operation agreement where confederate participants would have the opportunity to take the oath and avoid prosecution. Even post war Grant envisioned a joint force of veterans conducting the operation.

All that to say, a common foe or objective can create common ground.
A very good and important point. They had been comrades in arms. Thanks much for this post.
 



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