What Did the North and South Have in Common from 1850-1860?


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James Lutzweiler

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#23
A common European lineage - especially Northern Euro and to narrow it down a little more, Anglo-Saxon.

A common personality trait of adventurism. You were either 'of status' and coming to the New World in search of wealth and position or you weren't and felt you had nothing to lose (and much to gain) by leaving that which you were most familiar with, risking your life during an uncertain ocean voyage, coming to a new land you knew nothing about, (and perhaps didn't even speak the predominant language), to make a new life for yourself and your family. How many of us would do that today?

A certain country use to teach that that is why they found the American Government so difficult to deal with - we are a people who descended from mavericks that left everything they held dear and accustomed to for an unknown chance of hope...or die trying.

To quote Bill Murray in 'Stripes' "Cut it out! Cut it out! Cut it out! The hell's the matter with you? Stupid! We're all very different people. We're not Watusi. We're not Spartans. We're Americans, with a capital 'A', huh? You know what that means? Do ya? That means that our forefathers were kicked out of every decent country in the world. We are the wretched refuse. We're the underdog. We're mutts! Here's proof: his nose is cold! But there's no animal that's more faithful, that's more loyal, more loveable than the mutt. Who saw "Old Yeller?" Who cried when Old Yeller got shot at the end?"

Probably more philosophical vs empirical than you were looking for...
125

Cheers,
USS ALASKA
Glad I asked. Bill Murray rules!
 

uaskme

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#24
"The Panic of 1857 was a financial panic in the United States caused by the declining international economy and over-expansion of the domestic economy. Because of the interconnectedness of the world economy by the 1850s, the financial crisis that began in late 1857 was the first worldwide economic crisis ...

By the spring of 1858, "commercial credit had dried up, forcing already debt-ridden merchants of the West to curtail new purchases of inventory"; as a result of limited purchasing in the west, merchants around the country began to see decreases in sales and profits.[6] The railroads "had created an interdependent national economy, and now an economic downturn in the West threatened ... [an] economic crisis".[6] Since many banks had financed the railroads and land purchases, they began to feel the pressures of the falling value of railroad securities. The Illinois Central; Erie; Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago; and Reading Railroad lines were all forced to shut down owing to the financial downturn. The Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad and the Fond du Lac Railroad companies were forced to declare bankruptcy.[16] The Boston and Worcester Railroad Company also experienced heavy financial difficulties. The employees were informed, in a memo written in late October 1857, "the receipts from Passengers and Freight have fallen off during [the] last month (as compared with the corresponding month of last year), over twenty thousand dollars, with very little prospect of any improvement during the coming winter."[17] The company also announced that their workers would receive a "reduction in ... pay of ten percent".[18] In addition to the decreasing value of railroad securities, farmers began to default on payments on their mortgaged lands in the west, which put more financial pressure on banks.[16]
The prices of grain also decreased significantly, and farmers experienced a loss in revenue, causing banks to foreclose on recently purchased lands. Grain prices in 1855 had skyrocketed to $2.19 a bushel, and farmers began to purchase land to increase their crop supply, which in turn would increase their profits. However, by 1858, grain prices dropped severely to $0.80 a bushel.[19] Many Midwest towns felt the pressures of the Panic. For example, the town of Keokuk, Iowa experienced financial strife due to the economic downturns of 1857.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panic_of_1857
Had little affect on the AG South. Another reason for the term King Cotton. As JGG has noted
 

JAGwinn

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#31
A) Both North and South held to the legality of the U. S. Constitution and Bill of Rights for the Caucasian race, and found support for their just positions in their separate interpretations of them.
B) Both North and South held to the Bible as a guide to their respective positions and used it to legitimatize their actions.
 
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#32
Our revolutionary heritage - all 13 colonies fought equally hard (for eight years mind you) for our independence from Great Britain. Subsequent generations venerated George Washington in ways that are, for many folks today, difficult to fathom - as an example, my elementary school had portraits of Washington in every classroom.
I think we've lost something important and unifying because we no longer venerate the Founders like we used to. I remember the famous painting of Washington crossing the Delaware was in the hallway of my elementary school opposite the offices, and we had a picture of Washington in my fifth grade class. This was in the late 70s/early 80s, so it wasn't really all that many decades ago. A lot has changed.
 

jgoodguy

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#33
I think we've lost something important and unifying because we no longer venerate the Founders like we used to. I remember the famous painting of Washington crossing the Delaware was in the hallway of my elementary school opposite the offices, and we had a picture of Washington in my fifth grade class. This was in the late 70s/early 80s, so it wasn't really all that many decades ago. A lot has changed.
That was before we discovered they had feet of clay, a bunch of lawyers, politicians and slave owners long dead used by politicians to support all sorts of nefarious purposes.
 

OpnCoronet

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#35
As many on this board already know, I am one of those who believe that without slavery there would have been significant difference, in gov't, culture or economy.

Another question I have asked repeatedly over the years, Without Slavery, would a traveler from Europe have been able to discern the significant differences in a village just across the border from each other, between Illinois and Ky(or Va. and Pa.) ? If so, what would they be?
 
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#36
As many on this board already know, I am one of those who believe that without slavery there would have been significant difference, in gov't, culture or economy.

Another question I have asked repeatedly over the years, Without Slavery, would a traveler from Europe have been able to discern the significant differences in a village just across the border from each other, between Illinois and Ky(or Va. and Pa.) ? If so, what would they be?
A very good and thoughtful question. Say more.
 

jgoodguy

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#37
As many on this board already know, I am one of those who believe that without slavery there would have been significant difference, in gov't, culture or economy.

Another question I have asked repeatedly over the years, Without Slavery, would a traveler from Europe have been able to discern the significant differences in a village just across the border from each other, between Illinois and Ky(or Va. and Pa.) ? If so, what would they be?
There was a tourist industry of sorts bringing British tourists to tour the slave South. Some wrote accounts of it. The North was not that interesting.
 

OpnCoronet

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#39
I believe, that they had almost everything in common, except Slavery.

Lincoln made an impassioned plead to those who were not dedicated to breaking the Union, about the common history and culture and how the current problems were more likely to be settled by the bonds of brotherhood and kinship, rather than as two foreign governments.
 

jgoodguy

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#40
I believe, that they had almost everything in common, except Slavery.

Lincoln made an impassioned plead to those who were not dedicated to breaking the Union, about the common history and culture and how the current problems were more likely to be settled by the bonds of brotherhood and kinship, rather than as two foreign governments.
The Secessionists were as or more impassionate about being independent.
 



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