What did the founding fathers call the American Revolution?

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BuckeyeWarrior

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Jan 1, 2020
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Ohio
I have been searching for writings or quotes from the Revolutionary War era founding fathers on how they describe it. i.e. did they describe it as a revolution or rebellion? Or did they ever describe it as a secession. I have found one quote I will post here to begin this thread. Any help is greatly appreciated.


“As to the history of the revolution, my ideas may be peculiar perhaps singular. What do we mean by the revolution? The war? That was no part of the revolution; it was only an effect and consequence of it. The revolution was in the minds of the people, and this was effected from 1760 to 1775, in the course of fifteen years, before a drop of blood was shed at Lexington.”
— John Adams, Letter to Thomas Jefferson, August 24, 1815
 

Waterloo50

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I have been searching for writings or quotes from the Revolutionary War era founding fathers on how they describe it. i.e. did they describe it as a revolution or rebellion? Or did they ever describe it as a secession. I have found one quote I will post here to begin this thread. Any help is greatly appreciated.


“As to the history of the revolution, my ideas may be peculiar perhaps singular. What do we mean by the revolution? The war? That was no part of the revolution; it was only an effect and consequence of it. The revolution was in the minds of the people, and this was effected from 1760 to 1775, in the course of fifteen years, before a drop of blood was shed at Lexington.”
— John Adams, Letter to Thomas Jefferson, August 24, 1815
I haven’t a clue how the founding fathers referred to the war but at that time here in Britain it was known as, ‘The war for American Independence’ I guess any correspondence from the King and Parliament may well have used that term in their correspondence with their American counterparts. Perhaps the founding fathers also referred to it using the British term.
I recall once telling a German that I was interested in the Battle of Britain, he’d never heard of it, the Germans called it something different and that’s the problem, different countries/governments assign different names for the same theatre of war eg Brits and Americans called WW1 ‘The great War’, Germans knew it as the European war.
 

CW Buff

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Dec 22, 2014
Location
Connecticut
I have been searching for writings or quotes from the Revolutionary War era founding fathers on how they describe it. i.e. did they describe it as a revolution or rebellion? Or did they ever describe it as a secession. I have found one quote I will post here to begin this thread. Any help is greatly appreciated.


“As to the history of the revolution, my ideas may be peculiar perhaps singular. What do we mean by the revolution? The war? That was no part of the revolution; it was only an effect and consequence of it. The revolution was in the minds of the people, and this was effected from 1760 to 1775, in the course of fifteen years, before a drop of blood was shed at Lexington.”
— John Adams, Letter to Thomas Jefferson, August 24, 1815
How do BW. Welcome to the Forum.

"Objects of the most stupendous magnitude, and measure in which the lives and liberties of millions yet unborn are intimately interested, are now before us. We are in the very midst of a revolution the most complete, unexpected and remarkable of any in the history of nations." - John Adams Letter to William Cushing, June 9, 1776

"The times that tried men's souls are over-and the greatest and completest revolution the world ever knew, gloriously and happily accomplished." - Thomas Paine, The American Crisis, No. 13, 1783

"Had no important step been taken by the leaders of the Revolution for which a precedent could not be discovered, no government established of which an exact model did not present itself, the people of the United States might, at this moment have been numbered among the melancholy victims of misguided councils, must at best have been laboring under the weight of some of those forms which have crushed the liberties of the rest of mankind. Happily for America, happily, we trust, for the whole human race, they pursued a new and more noble course. They accomplished a revolution which has no parallel in the annals of human society." - James Madison, Federalist No. 14, November 20, 1787

"It is impossible for the man of pious reflection not to perceive in it [the Constitution] a finger of that Almighty hand which has been so frequently and signally extended to our relief in the critical stages of the revolution." - James Madison, Federalist No. 37, January 11, 1788
 
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BuckeyeWarrior

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Ohio
How do BW. Welcome to the Forum.

"Objects of the most stupendous magnitude, and measure in which the lives and liberties of millions yet unborn are intimately interested, are now before us. We are in the very midst of a revolution the most complete, unexpected and remarkable of any in the history of nations." - John Adams Letter to William Cushing, June 9, 1776

"The times that tried men's souls are over-and the greatest and completest revolution the world ever knew, gloriously and happily accomplished." - Thomas Paine, The American Crisis, No. 13, 1783

"Had no important step been taken by the leaders of the Revolution for which a precedent could not be discovered, no government established of which an exact model did not present itself, the people of the United States might, at this moment have been numbered among the melancholy victims of misguided councils, must at best have been laboring under the weight of some of those forms which have crushed the liberties of the rest of mankind. Happily for America, happily, we trust, for the whole human race, they pursued a new and more noble course. They accomplished a revolution which has no parallel in the annals of human society." - James Madison, Federalist No. 14, November 20, 1787

"It is impossible for the man of pious reflection not to perceive in it [the Constitution] a finger of that Almighty hand which has been so frequently and signally extended to our relief in the critical stages of the revolution." - James Madison, Federalist Papers, No. 37, January 11, 1788
Thank you for the welcome and thank you very much for the quotes!
 
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