What American Civil War Books Are You Planning On Buying/Reading Next?

R. Evans

Sergeant
Joined
Jan 19, 2013
Location
Salem, Ohio
Forgive me if there is a thread like this around. I did a search and couldn't find anything.:smile:

So here goes. These 3 should be here tomorrow or Saturday. Can't wait to dive in.​
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DMH

Cadet
Joined
Jun 3, 2021
https://gettysburgpublishing.com/store/ols/products/gettysburg-campaign-atlas

Got a copy of Phil Laino’s Gettysburg Campaign Atlas and it is as great as I was lead to believe it to be. Definitely pricier than my other recent book purchases but it is an incredible resource and well worth. Will be most helpful while working through the small mountain of Gettysburg books I’ve also compiled.
 

Bruce Vail

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
I'm looking forward to getting started on Blue Coats and Tar Heels by Mark L. Bradley (Unversity of Kentucky Press 2011), a study of Reconstruction in NC. I ordered in on inter-library loan from Baltimore's Enoch Pratt Free Library.

This is part of my research into family ancestor George Washington Ward, a Confederate veteran who had a post-war career in local politics in eastern NC. He was elected as a Democrat to the Duplin County Commission in 1876 and served as chairman of the Commission until his death in 1884.

I welcome any suggestion for other books on Reconstruction-era politics in NC that might help in my research.
 
I'm looking forward to getting started on Blue Coats and Tar Heels by Mark L. Bradley (Unversity of Kentucky Press 2011), a study of Reconstruction in NC. I ordered in on inter-library loan from Baltimore's Enoch Pratt Free Library.

This is part of my research into family ancestor George Washington Ward, a Confederate veteran who had a post-war career in local politics in eastern NC. He was elected as a Democrat to the Duplin County Commission in 1876 and served as chairman of the Commission until his death in 1884.

I welcome any suggestion for other books on Reconstruction-era politics in NC that might help in my research.
I imagine you're already aware of this one, but just in case:

https://archive.org/details/cu31924028788664/page/n16/mode/1up

Reconstruction in North Carolina, by Joseph Grégoire de Roulhac Hamilton (1914)

It's a state study by a member of the much-maligned "Dunning school" of Reconstruction historians, but their works often contain useful details and leads on other old sources. (I have not read this particular one.)
 

Bruce Vail

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Jul 8, 2015
I imagine you're already aware of this one, but just in case:

https://archive.org/details/cu31924028788664/page/n16/mode/1up

Reconstruction in North Carolina, by Joseph Grégoire de Roulhac Hamilton (1914)

It's a state study by a member of the much-maligned "Dunning school" of Reconstruction historians, but their works often contain useful details and leads on other old sources. (I have not read this particular one.)

Thanks for this. No, I was not aware of this particular book and am pleased to find it available free online. It will make good reference material for my reading on the subject.
 

Mr King

Sergeant
Joined
Jun 21, 2008
Just want to add to my earlier above post on book; From Arlington to Appomattox: Robert E. Lee's Civil War, Day by Day 1861-1865. It's been stated that there are many gaps of Freeman's 4 volume bookset on Lee(which I'm pleased to have along with the single volume abridged version)that are now in this book.
 

Lincoln56

Corporal
Joined
Jul 24, 2016
Location
Texas
Just finished “The Summer of ‘63: Gettysburg: Favorite Stories and Fresh Perspectives from the Historians at Emerging Civil War”. 284 pages. Publishing Date: June 30, 2021.

Most chapters started as blog topics posted on the Emerging Civil War web site. I found this an interesting and informative read. Two of the chapters are by our esteemed colleague Eric Wittenberg.

Pre-ordered, available on August 15, 2021: “The Summer of ‘63: Vicksburg and Tullahoma: Favorite Stories and Fresh Perspectives from the Historians at Emerging Civil War” 244 pages.

Both are part of the Emerging Civil War 10th Anniversary series.
 

DMH

Cadet
Joined
Jun 3, 2021
Last night I finished the third volume of Shelby Foote’s trilogy…it’s actually been many years of starting it, stopping, restarting, picking up back later, etc…but it’s a series that I loved taking my time to make my way through. I know Foote is a polarizing figure, but it was a pleasure to read

Now…starting Coddington’s The Gettysburg Campaign today. I know the high reputation this one has and while only 50-60 pages in, I’m presently surprised that the writing is actually super readable and flows very nicely.
 

Andersonh1

Brigadier General
Moderator
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Location
South Carolina
I'm in the final chapters of "Pickett's Charge - The Last Attack at Gettysburg" by Earl Hess. Excellent book, more history should be written this way. There's very little editorial comment by the author, though we do get a little. For the most part it's facts about the units who were involved in the charge on both sides, a brief description of their commanders and war record up to that point, and descriptions of what they experienced before, during and after the charge. All of this is interspersed with accounts by those who were there that day, describing what they saw. When accounts conflict they are examined against others, and when the author believes that someone's memory has gaps, or that they twisted the facts for their benefit, he says so and explains why he reached that conclusion. There are photos of many of the commanders on both sides, and various maps showing where the units were as the charge progressed. It really is an excellent bit of historical writing.
 

DMH

Cadet
Joined
Jun 3, 2021
I'm in the final chapters of "Pickett's Charge - The Last Attack at Gettysburg" by Earl Hess. Excellent book, more history should be written this way. There's very little editorial comment by the author, though we do get a little. For the most part it's facts about the units who were involved in the charge on both sides, a brief description of their commanders and war record up to that point, and descriptions of what they experienced before, during and after the charge. All of this is interspersed with accounts by those who were there that day, describing what they saw. When accounts conflict they are examined against others, and when the author believes that someone's memory has gaps, or that they twisted the facts for their benefit, he says so and explains why he reached that conclusion. There are photos of many of the commanders on both sides, and various maps showing where the units were as the charge progressed. It really is an excellent bit of historical writing.
One I’ve been looking at, so glad to hear this. Might have to pick it up in the near future to add to my ever-growing stack…
 

farrargirl

Corporal
Joined
Jul 9, 2017
Location
Baldwin County, on the Alabama Gulf Coast
Oh, you are a lucky mama!

The only one of these I have read is Mosby's Memoirs. I am one of the many, many readers who have been disppointed by this book, but I suppose that is really Walt Disney's fault for romanticizing the life of a partisan ranger for a lot of us older TV viewers.
Cool. I will keep that in mind so as not to be disappointed 😁...
 

farrargirl

Corporal
Joined
Jul 9, 2017
Location
Baldwin County, on the Alabama Gulf Coast
I'm in the final chapters of "Pickett's Charge - The Last Attack at Gettysburg" by Earl Hess. Excellent book, more history should be written this way. There's very little editorial comment by the author, though we do get a little. For the most part it's facts about the units who were involved in the charge on both sides, a brief description of their commanders and war record up to that point, and descriptions of what they experienced before, during and after the charge. All of this is interspersed with accounts by those who were there that day, describing what they saw. When accounts conflict they are examined against others, and when the author believes that someone's memory has gaps, or that they twisted the facts for their benefit, he says so and explains why he reached that conclusion. There are photos of many of the commanders on both sides, and various maps showing where the units were as the charge progressed. It really is an excellent bit of historical writing.
I was wondering if you have read this one by George R. Stewart ? Have had for a few years but never read it....
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