What ACW Books Are You Planning On Buying/Reading Next?

Jamieva

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I was referencing volume 1 campaign of giants. I’ve watched every ABT video from Petersburg and he was very entertaining and knowledgeable. Figured if his books were half as good then I should give a read

I figured you were. It is the best Petersburg book I have read and I am eagerly awaiting the 2nd one. Greene's writing is very good and you never feel like teh book is dragging or a slog.
 

Cavalier

First Sergeant
Joined
Jul 20, 2019
I read it about ten years or so ago but am now going to read it again, Until Antietam: The Life and Letters of Major General Israel B. Richardson, by Jack C. Mason.

One of my very favorite Generals, a man who General Winfield Scott referred to as "Fighting Dick". Coming from Scott, that's quite a compliment in my opinion.

John
 

Lincoln56

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Jul 24, 2016
Location
Texas
I was referencing volume 1 campaign of giants. I’ve watched every ABT video from Petersburg and he was very entertaining and knowledgeable. Figured if his books were half as good then I should give a read
@dlavin I wasn't trying to be snarky in my response to you and I apologize if it came across this way. I figured Campaign was what you were referencing, and I haven't started it yet. What I've read of Final Battles of the Petersburg Campaign is excellent and made me want to acquire the other two I referenced.

I enjoy Greene's writing style very much FWIW and am looking forward to volume 2 also.
 

dlavin

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Jun 1, 2015
Location
North Balt Co., MD
@dlavin I wasn't trying to be snarky in my response to you and I apologize if it came across this way. I figured Campaign was what you were referencing, and I haven't started it yet. What I've read of Final Battles of the Petersburg Campaign is excellent and made me want to acquire the other two I referenced.

I enjoy Greene's writing style very much FWIW and am looking forward to volume 2 also.
Didn’t think that at all. Figured you were asking which book I meant. In fact I didn’t know he had more than one on Petersburg until you mentioned it. Many positive comments so I think I will look for it
 

jeffobryant

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Joined
Jan 7, 2017
Well, here is some shameless self-promotion, but I hope some of you might find my upcoming book of interest. It covers Lincoln's fictional appearances in literature, television, film (going back to the silent era), comic books, old-time radio, animation, and more. It also exposes some of the apocryphal Lincoln stories many take as fact. From the back of the book:

Honest Abe. The rail-splitter. The Great Emancipator. Old Abe. These are familiar monikers of Abraham Lincoln, appellations admirers the world-over instantly recognize. They describe a man who has influenced the lives of everyday men and women as well as notables like Leo Tolstoy, Marilyn Monroe, and Winston Churchill.

But there are a multitude of fictional Lincolns almost as familiar as the original: time traveler, android, monster hunter, and more. As the star of stage and screen, Lincoln has become the subject of tales even taller than himself. He has been Simpsonized by Matt Groening, charmed by Shirley Temple, and emulated by the Lone Ranger. Countless devotees have attempted to rescue him through time travel, to clone him, or to raise him from the dead. Apparently, you just can't keep a good president down.

Lincoln's image and memory have also been invoked to fight communism, mock a sitting president, and sell a variety of products. Lincoln has even been portrayed as the greatest example of goodness humanity has to offer. In short, Lincoln is the essential American myth.

The Mythic Mr. Lincoln explores Lincoln's evolution from martyred president to cultural icon and the struggle between the Lincoln of history and his fictional progeny.

The cover is attached and it is due out in August of this year. Thanks all!

the-mythic-mr.-lincoln-1.jpg
 
Joined
Dec 12, 2020


Henry and Clara​

By Thomas Mallon (1994)
2. “Henry and Clara” established Thomas Mallon as a master of historical fiction. Clara Rathbone—vain, clever and socially ambitious—reflects, near the climax of this blood-drenched novel, that she always sensed “there was a secret sewn into the violence of that night.” She is referring to April 14, 1865, when she and her fiancé, Maj. Henry Rathbone, last-minute guests of the Lincolns in their box at Ford’s Theatre, witness the assassination of the president. That much is true. But Mr. Mallon seamlessly blends fact and fiction in this sharply angled historic tableau. Clara’s “blind love” for her Byronic stepbrother can only end tragically, and through Clara Mr. Mallon also conveys just how unprepared the North is for the cataclysm of the war. In the spring of 1861, when Clara learns that her father, U.S. Senator Ira Harris, will allow her semi-incestuous marriage as soon as the Union declares victory, she exclaims, “I’m so happy! Maybe this war is a blessing—God forgive me for saying it.” Mr. Mallon, a stylish, witty writer, almost imperceptibly transforms his love story into a heart-stopping psychological thriller.
 

American87

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Aug 27, 2016
Location
PENNSYLVANIA
Hm, I see R. Evans transposed my topic to another forum and reworded it a bit.

But MY, I mean the book I'm reading now, is Shelby Foote's Narrative of the Civil War, or something like that haha.

It's very good. All the criticisms of him not being an historian out there, I consider him as first rate as any. Certainly equal, at least, to McPherson who brushes over research with his own pro-Lincoln judgements.

It's a very good book, I'm on volume 1, and it offers a lot of character insights and battle descriptions that never occurred to me before. It's definitely top notch if you want a general overview of the military and some of the political aspects of the war.
 
Joined
Dec 12, 2020
Hm, I see R. Evans transposed my topic to another forum and reworded it a bit.

But MY, I mean the book I'm reading now, is Shelby Foote's Narrative of the Civil War, or something like that haha.

It's very good. All the criticisms of him not being an historian out there, I consider him as first rate as any. Certainly equal, at least, to McPherson who brushes over research with his own pro-Lincoln judgements.

It's a very good book, I'm on volume 1, and it offers a lot of character insights and battle descriptions that never occurred to me before. It's definitely top notch if you want a general overview of the military and some of the political aspects of the war.
I love his books. I listen to them on audio.
 

Study the Past

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Sep 29, 2016
Location
Middle Tennessee via Detroit Rock City
Finished Vicksburg 1863. Will return to Vicksburg next book but first I am going to try this. Got interested again after visiting the Chattanooga National Cemetery so let's see how much Disney got wrong in his movie.View attachment 398548

Fess Parker did a wonderful job in that role as Andrews. There is a neat video on Youtube that is almost 50 minutes long, about the making of the movie, narrated by Parker & others, and goes in depth on how Disney loved history and was particular in getting things right, whether by hiring consultants, distant relatives of those involved, etc. Looks like a neat book, though!
 

Dead Parrott

Sergeant
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Jul 30, 2019
Currently reading Anderson's "Crucible of War" so I'm roughly 100 years off target! (and several 100 pages left to go!).

But after that, I'm actually up for a good deep book on the Red River campaign(s) - any recommendations?
 

ErnieMac

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I recently completed Meade and Lee at Rappahannock Station: The Army of the Potomac's First Post-Gettysburg Offensive, From Kelly's Ford to the Rapidan, October 21 to November 20, 1863. I will detail that more fully in a book review. Shortly after completing that book I found America's Buried History: Landmines in the Civil War by Kenneth R. Rutherford. Rutherford, the survivor of a landmine explosion in Somalia in 1993, is a founder of the Landmine Survivors Network and a noted advocate for the banning of landmines. During his research about the history of landmines he discovered their use in the American Civil War and this book is the result. I've just started reading it, but have learned a few new facts already.
 

Jamieva

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Midlothian, VA
I recently completed Meade and Lee at Rappahannock Station: The Army of the Potomac's First Post-Gettysburg Offensive, From Kelly's Ford to the Rapidan, October 21 to November 20, 1863. I will detail that more fully in a book review. Shortly after completing that book I found America's Buried History: Landmines in the Civil War by Kenneth R. Rutherford. Rutherford, the survivor of a landmine explosion in Somalia in 1993, is a founder of the Landmine Survivors Network and a noted advocate for the banning of landmines. During his research about the history of landmines he discovered their use in the American Civil War and this book is the result. I've just started reading it, but have learned a few new facts already.

I just finished Rutherford's book in the last month. It is very interesting and I learned a ton from it.
 

davepi2

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columbus ohio
Fess Parker did a wonderful job in that role as Andrews. There is a neat video on Youtube that is almost 50 minutes long, about the making of the movie, narrated by Parker & others, and goes in depth on how Disney loved history and was particular in getting things right, whether by hiring consultants, distant relatives of those involved, etc. Looks like a neat book
 

gjpratt

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Joined
Apr 14, 2019
Well I finally got around to reading Robert G. Tanner’s significantly revised account of the Valley Campaign. It is very insightful and has altered my understanding of Stonewall Jackson and his movements. For me Jackson displayed military genius but on a different level than he has been credited for. The attrition from the constant forced marches was eye opening. There was also a nice side benefit. Between the time I was first enamored of the Valley Campaign for which Tanner’s first book was my bible and now, I acquired an item attributable to Capt. James Carrington of the Charlottesville Light Artillery. I acquired it for his association with the battery’s sacrifice at the Mule Shoe. Reading Tanner’s account of Port Republic I recognized Carrington’s name. In his first action of the war he manned the guns that broke up the Union cavalry raid that surprised and almost captured Stonewall and the army’s train. The documentation that came with my item did not mention this association and I never thought to dig deeper. But now I am very happy to have something associated with Jackson and in a historically significant way.

For my next book, I started David Stanley’s memoirs last night. Next up is Stephen Davis’ 2 volume treatment of Hood.
 

ErnieMac

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I have started reading When the Irish Invaded Canada: The Incredible Story of the Civil War Veterans Who Fought For Ireland's Freedom by Christopher Klein. While the subject matter is not strictly CW, as noted in the title many of the participants received their military training during the Civil War. The Irish Fenian societies recruited the ex-soldiers (from North and South) and furnished them with surplus weapons and accoutrements. The idea was for the Irish ex-patriots to take over Canada and trade it back to Brain for Irish independence. I'm about 10% into the book right now, interesting reading.
 

Fairfield

First Sergeant
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
I am going to read A Slave's Cause by Manisha Sinha. Recently I heard a Zoom broadcast by Dr. Sinha on feminism and was so impressed that I decided to read what I could find. Since feminism has roots in the abolitionist movement, I decided to start here.
 

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