What ACW Books Are You Planning On Buying/Reading Next?

Ricochet

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I have just started reading the 1914 edition of "Confederate Wizards of the Saddle". It is a very nice copy, a First Edition, and is signed by the author, Bennett H. Young. I never knew he led such an amazing life.
 

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Bruce Vail

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Making my way through " Team of Rivals", which is actually far more interesting than I thought it might be! Do all leaders in war put their own careers ahead of national issues? Gee Whillikers!!!! Get your acts together, guys, Get over yourselves!!!!!
My cavil with Team of Rivals is that it was commonplace in early US history for ambitous politicians to serve in the cabinet on their way to the White House, or prior to an unsuccessful attempt(s) to be elected president. Most of us know, for example, that Thomas Jefferson served in Washington's cabinet. Many of us also know that presidential wannabes like Clay and Calhoun served in the cabinet. Lincoln's predecessor, Buchanan, has been in the cabinet under President Polk.

What was not commonplace about Lincoln's cabinet was that it was a war cabinet in the most cataclysmic military conflict in US history. There was therefore a sense of urgency and purpose that overrode a lot of the petty political bullxxxx that characterized the progress of so many of the earlier cabinets.
 

Norm53

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My cavil with Team of Rivals is that it was commonplace in early US history for ambitous politicians to serve in the cabinet on their way to the White House, or prior to an unsuccessful attempt(s) to be elected president. Most of us know, for example, that Thomas Jefferson served in Washington's cabinet. Many of us also know that presidential wannabes like Clay and Calhoun served in the cabinet. Lincoln's predecessor, Buchanan, has been in the cabinet under President Polk.

What was not commonplace about Lincoln's cabinet was that it was a war cabinet in the most cataclysmic military conflict in US history. There was therefore a sense of urgency and purpose that overrode a lot of the petty political bullxxxx that characterized the progress of so many of the earlier cabinets.
I consider Team of Rivals to be a classic study of political leadership, applicable not only to the ACW, but for all time. I have the highest regard for the author's monumental research for this book. It deserved the Pulitzer.
 

Bruce Vail

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I consider Team of Rivals to be a classic study of political leadership, applicable not only to the ACW, but for all time. I have the highest regard for the author's monumental research for this book. It deserved the Pulitzer.
I agree that all of Doris Kearns Goodwin's books are first rate. I call it a "cavil" because the only thing about the book I really don't like is the title. Any study of the civilian war lords of Washington by Goodwin is worth reading....
 
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ErnieMac

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I recently completed Meade and Lee at Bristoe Station: The Problems of Command and Strategy after Gettysburg, from Brandy Station to the Buckland Races, August 1 to October 31, 1863 by Jeffrey Wm. Hunt. It is by far and away the best description of the Bristoe Campaign that I have read. The book is pretty much a day by day account of the maneuvers of the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Northern Virginia during the late summer / early autumn of 1863. Planning details and execution (or lack of in some cases) details well covered. Dozens of well executed maps.
I picked up the hardback, but Amazon has it on Kindle for $2.99 today.
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Bruce Vail

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Just started reading Lee's Maverick General: Daniel Harvey Hill by Hal Bridges.

The book is supposed to be an effort to rescue D.H. Hill's reputation. I'm not far enough into it to make any judgement on how well Bridges succeeds but I go into the debate as an agnostic anyway. From what I have read about Harvey in the past it seems he was an able commander whose career was hampered by some personality problems. That really doesn't make him highly unusual in the Civil War era...
 

DaveBrt

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Whisonant, Arming the Confederacy, How Virginia's Minerals Forged the Rebel War Machine. Written by a professional geologist who lives in the Virginia mountains.
 

DaveBrt

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Whisonant, Arming the Confederacy, How Virginia's Minerals Forged the Rebel War Machine. Written by a professional geologist who lives in the Virginia mountains.
 

David H.

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Am now reading "One Continuous Fight" by Eric Wittenberg. Great book - wish my wife and I could have attended the recent event led by Mr. Wittenberg.
 

bdtex

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I am certainly not planning to buy any books in the near future. My father just gave me 6 boxes of Civil War books and I already had only 5 of them. I'm stocked for years to come.
 

David H.

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Is the book "Decisions at Gettysburg: The 19 Critical Decisions that Defined the Campaign" by Matt Spruill worth reading? If not, are there better books to read on decision making at Gettysburg?
 

M2HA

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I just got a copy of The Artillery Service in the War of the Rebellion By John C. Tidball.

I also have Walter Taylor and Charles Marshall's memoirs about their staff service with Lee.
 
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Just got The Battle of Gettysburg Frank Haskell and Service with The 6th Wisconsin Fours Years in the Iron Brigade which is about Rufus Dawes for my e-reader started the Frank Haskell book first it's the shortest can't wait to get to the Dawes book he fascinates me seemed like a hard charger a fighter!
 

mobile_96

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Now that my online book group has finished "Pursuit of Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, July 4-14, 1863" and will be quiet until Sept 3rd, I can finally start "Meade and Lee at Bristoe Station" by J.Hunt. Didn't feel like I should read 2 books on the aftermath of Getts, at the same time.
 

DaveBrt

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Just finished Whisonant, Arming the Confederacy, How Virginia's Minerals Forged the Rebel War Machine. Written by a professional geologist who lives in the Virginia mountains.

This is a superficial look at a half dozen minerals supplied by Virginia to the war and the Virginia & Tennessee Railroad. It is worth the time for those with little knowledge of the subject, but the author has done no in depth research, relying heavily on local histories and diaries.

Despite having written many papers and articles, he has not done a lot of basic fact checking. Examples, he mentions the use and production of steel railroad rails some 20 times, though there were no steel rails in use in America until after the war. He claim that Centreville/Manassas Junction was served by 11 railroads. He claims 19 locomotives were built in the South in 1860 when none were. He repeats the number of railroad gauges issue and the lack of connections through the cities. He claims the Northern railroad system ran on coal (only 3 roads did). He claims Longstreet's move was forced to contend with "numerous mis-matched gauges" (there was one gauge change). He also states that the South made no railroad cars during the war (some 300 were completed and 200 more were in process of construction -- several hundred others are mentioned, with no definitive numbers or dates in the records).

So, the book is useful, but double check before referencing.
 


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