We've Come A Long Way, Baby- Ladies, Voting And That Time New Jersey Lost It's Mind

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JPK Huson 1863

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Location
Central Pennsylvania
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Last time for around a century and a half women saw their voice counted, illustration represents New Jersey's temporary inclusion of we ladies in our democratic process. It wasn't until 1920 the 19th Amendment unlocked those doors, not for lack of trying in between.

As usual, sticking to accounts between 1861 and 1865. Relating an odd kick in History's gallop from our post-Revolutionary War period but the article ran in 1864, Leslie's.

Browsing newspapers, topic of women audaciously demanding the right to vote - and men determinedly denying we were capable anywhere near a poll came up in 1860 and 1864. The Stowes were vocal advocates, Reverend and Harriet Beecher Stowe including support in speeches across New England. A few of us marched into election booths despite illegality and were promptly arrested. Nothing new there.

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Widely reported story of the day, abolitionist and social reformer Phillips- seems to have been true, if paraphrased. 1864.

1860, Women's Rights were patiently pushed- and not-so-patiently pushed away.
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It had been over a decade since Seneca Fall's two day convention, declaring women had the same rights and responsibilities of citizenship as men. By 1860, not a lot had changed.

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Harper's illustration, Seneca Falls 1848 women's rights convention disrupted by men in the peanut gallery- safety in numbers, love to have heard the conversation when each got home. Expecting dinner and a foot rub.

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We tried awfully hard. One hilarious reason to keep us out politics? We'd tempt those poor, easily misguided men. With our charms. Article on abolitionist-social reformer Lucy from 1860. Seneca Falls was not allowed to be forgotten. What's weird is how long it took.

Best example of we almost made it, the New Jersey story- we were there, voting, while our country was still wet behind the ears, the Revolution's dust still settling. It remains a great story despite all the era scoffing.

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Despite publications like Leslie's and Harper's ( and you just know Mrs. Frank Leslie wielded her weapon beautifully ) supporting women in politics and in the polls, my grandmother watched the vote happen and she was a Washington intern- 4 great grandmothers didn't vote until they had grandchildren. 1920, the 19th Amendment- a precious document that took awhile.

First women voters, New Jersey women, 1776-1807
First female candidate for President, 1872, Victoria Woodhull
First woman elected to Congress, Montana's Jeanette Rankin, 1916
First women senator, Rebecca Latimer Felton of Georgia sworn in 1922
First woman to vote, Lydia Taft, Uxbridge, Mass., 1756 ( look it up )
First woman to vote under the 19th, , one claim, Miss Margaret Newburgh of South St. Paul voted at 6 a.m, South St. Paul,
First two women to vote under the 19th Amendment, Mrs. Marie Ruoff Byrum, 7:00 a.m., Mrs. Walker Harrison, 7:01 a.m., Hannibal, Missouri
First black woman elected to state legislature, Crystal Bird Faucet, Pennsylvania, 1938


So use it.
 

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LoyaltyOfDogs

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Who knew, @JPK Huson 1863, that New Jersey was (so briefly) ahead of its time! I'm enjoying the expressions on the faces of the men in the old picture. Some look like they could be offering advice, at least one man appears to be escorting a woman to the polls, one bystander in the back might be frowning, and a man waving his hat appears to be grinning. Some may be skeptical, but they're still letting the women vote! The dog, however, just looks aghast. Maybe he thinks it's against the natural order of things.

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JPK Huson 1863

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
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Feb 14, 2012
Location
Central Pennsylvania
Who knew, @JPK Huson 1863, that New Jersey was (so briefly) ahead of its time! I'm enjoying the expressions on the faces of the men in the old picture. Some look like they could be offering advice, at least one man appears to be escorting a woman to the polls, one bystander in the back might be frowning, and a man waving his hat appears to be grinning. Some may be skeptical, but they're still letting the women vote! The dog, however, just looks aghast. Maybe he thinks it's against the natural order of things.

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Yes, he ( you just know it's a guy dog ) seems astonished, doesn't he? Finding the inclusion of a surprised dog baffling! I mean, the most chauvinistic dog alive knows who it who feeds him daily. It was to his advantage at least to pretend he's delighted. " Isn't that the Kibble lady? " " Yes, it is old Spot old boy, 10 bucks if you bite her ankles. " " No can do, old sport. If you're not bright enough to value a happy home life, I am. " " But Spot, she's voting. It's un-American. " " Well then you bite her ankles. It's past lunch time. I'm hungry. "

So funny, isn't it? Husband does seem to be instructing his wife. Seems foolhardy, poor guy. Telling any of us what to do is a risk.
 

JPK Huson 1863

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Joined
Feb 14, 2012
Location
Central Pennsylvania
Since this forum also includes the Reconstruction period:
My home state of Wyoming (then a territory) gave women the vote in 1869!

I turned in my ballot last Wednesday. Have you voted? If not, please do so!

Did not know that! 1869! Go, Wyoming, where the divorce rate of 1869 dropped like a bucket. Great grandmother was around for that- Rawlins, late 1880's.
 
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