Were Southern whites disfranchised during Reconstruction?

unionblue

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You want “factual documentation” that there was a fear of free blacks in the South?
Nope, I want factual incidents of free blacks/"uncontrolled blacks" causing actual harm or tormenting southern whites, something I find amazing with all of the slave patrols and laws governing the behavior of free blacks in the region.

Please provide such evidence if it is available.
 

19thGeorgia

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It appears that some things that were going on during the war-
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/we...ing-reconstruction.138023/page-7#post-2408913
-were still going on after the war...

I suppose it was naive of me to think that would just stop because of April 9, 1865.

Memphis Appeal, July 24, 1869.
Captain A.J. Haynes was commander of a militia company that terrorized places like Crittenden County, Arkansas, on a regular basis.

MemphisAppeal24july1869.jpg

appeal2.jpg
 
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unionblue

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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In answer to your original OP, yes, southern whites were disinfranchised during reconstruction.

AFTER reconstruction, the then newly reinfranchised southern whites did their absolute best to disinfranchise southern blacks.

The rest of the story gives a far more complete picture of the history of the time, don't you think?
 

19thGeorgia

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I suppose it was naive of me to think that would just stop because of April 9, 1865.

Memphis Appeal, July 24, 1869.
Captain A.J. Haynes was commander of a militia company that terrorized places like Crittenden County, Arkansas, on a regular basis.
Blight, Foner, McPherson...they didn't tell me about A.J. Haynes.
 

Cycom

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Nope, I want factual incidents of free blacks/"uncontrolled blacks" causing actual harm or tormenting southern whites, something I find amazing with all of the slave patrols and laws governing the behavior of free blacks in the region.

Please provide such evidence if it is available.
a FEAR of uncontrolled blacks.

The word has been bolded twice because there is a difference between a fear of something (either based on reality, irrational, or otherwise) and actual incidents.

There indeed was a fear of “uncontrolled blacks”
in the antebellum years and after emancipation.
 

unionblue

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a FEAR of uncontrolled blacks.

The word has been bolded twice because there is a difference between a fear of something (either based on reality, irrational, or otherwise) and actual incidents.

There indeed was a fear of “uncontrolled blacks”
in the antebellum years and after emancipation.

Oh, a FEAR of uncontrolled blacks, vice actual instances of such, is that what you are saying?
 

Cycom

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Oh, a FEAR of uncontrolled blacks, vice actual instances of such, is that what you are saying?
That’s exactly what I’m saying.

There is a difference between a mindset and the carrying out of that mindset.

Here is the quote some of you seemed to be offended by:

“Reconstruction did nothing to improve pre-war concerns about uncontrolled blacks.”

What about this is confusing to you?
 

unionblue

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Ocala, FL (as of December, 2015).
That’s exactly what I’m saying.

There is a difference between a mindset and the carrying out of that mindset.

Here is the quote some of you seemed to be offended by:

“Reconstruction did nothing to improve pre-war concerns about uncontrolled blacks.”

What about this is confusing to you?
Relax.

It's not confusing me to ask for clarification on what you were trying to say.
 

Hawkins

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Sep 18, 2017
Did any history/historian tell you the eventual end of A.J. Haynes?


My question to the OP too.
According to various accounts (Clayton's Aftermath p.177, Singletary's Negro Militia and Reconstruction p.125, and several newspaper reports), A.J. Haynes was shot and killed on July 15, 1869 by Clarence Collier, an alleged Klan member and murderer, in Marion, Arkansas. He is one of several accounts that Singletary uses to illustrate that "[n]egro militia captains were singled out and executed."
 

19thGeorgia

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According to various accounts (Clayton's Aftermath p.177, Singletary's Negro Militia and Reconstruction p.125, and several newspaper reports), A.J. Haynes was shot and killed on July 15, 1869 by Clarence Collier, an alleged Klan member and murderer, in Marion, Arkansas. He is one of several accounts that Singletary uses to illustrate that "[n]egro militia captains were singled out and executed."
He made a lot of enemies...
 

unionblue

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Location
Ocala, FL (as of December, 2015).
According to various accounts (Clayton's Aftermath p.177, Singletary's Negro Militia and Reconstruction p.125, and several newspaper reports), A.J. Haynes was shot and killed on July 15, 1869 by Clarence Collier, an alleged Klan member and murderer, in Marion, Arkansas. He is one of several accounts that Singletary uses to illustrate that "[n]egro militia captains were singled out and executed."
@Hawkins ,

Thank you for the above information.

Sincerely,
Unionblue
 

Hawkins

Private
Joined
Sep 18, 2017
Maybe not...
Perhaps, but we do know that Haynes' death did spark a local response. Not only was a local posse formed by the sheriff to arrest Collier and others, but the local black population formed their own hunting party. Additionally, as noted by Clayton, 29 "reputable citizens of Crittendon County, of both political parties, six of whom were officials" wrote to the Memphis Appeal to dispute that paper's accounting of Haynes' death. While the group did label Haynes as "a prejudiced man" and many disagreed with him politically, they deplored what they characterized as "a deliberate, cold, and brutal murder." My guess is they didn't take too kindly to shooting a someone in the back with buckshot before several coup de grâce as he was sprawled bleeding facedown in the dirt, but I think that digresses from the OP.
 

19thGeorgia

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"We had 40,000 loyal votes in Tennessee, and 80,000 rebel votes; and we disfranchised the 80,000 rebel votes, and we are now holding them back from the ballot-box....I am North, making arrangements to procure arms and ammunition. We have the boys at home; we have 30,000 men there who have been in the Federal army….our Legislature is square up with the Radical Congress of the United States…" -from a speech by Governor Brownlow (New York Times, September 12, 1866)
 
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unionblue

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Ocala, FL (as of December, 2015).
I am reminded of a former members quote on this topic from a long time ago.

"If you wish to secede, be sure you succeed."

It infers there will be consequences if one fail at an attempted rebellion. Being disfranchised comes across as rather mild when compared to other rebellions, especially when one considers just how quickly Southern whites were welcomed back into the national political arena so soon after trying to destroy the nation from which they originally came.

Just an observation.
 
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