Were Southern whites disfranchised during Reconstruction?

John S. Carter

Sergeant Major
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
Some? Most? All? And what happened in each state?
Only if you did not vote Republican in 1860 or wore butternut clothing .I think if you were to promise to be a good and loyal citizen and regret your mistake in fighting against the Blue side,then you could return under the good graces of the Repressive Union government.That is possible how those who were disfranchised felt. Neither Grant nor Sherman mention any such as to disfranchisement in the surrender.That is what the common soldier thought, that they could just return home and start anew .A question would be what part did disfranchisement contribute to the ill feelings because of this?
 

unionblue

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Member of the Year
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Ocala, FL (as of December, 2015).
Only if you did not vote Republican in 1860 or wore butternut clothing .I think if you were to promise to be a good and loyal citizen and regret your mistake in fighting against the Blue side,then you could return under the good graces of the Repressive Union government.That is possible how those who were disfranchised felt. Neither Grant nor Sherman mention any such as to disfranchisement in the surrender.That is what the common soldier thought, that they could just return home and start anew .A question would be what part did disfranchisement contribute to the ill feelings because of this?

Sources for your view above?
 

unionblue

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Member of the Year
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Ocala, FL (as of December, 2015).
Ever wonder why white Southerners in the nine states without black majorities didn't vote the hated carpetbaggers and scalawags out of office during Radical Reconstruction?

Yes, why didn't they? Was each state different in it's restrictions on former Confederates voting? Or were thet the same across the former Confederacy?

How long was it before the KKK and Southern whites began restricting the black vote? Was it after Southerners got their voting rights back or before?

Curious.

Unionblue
 

CSA Today

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Dec 3, 2011
Location
Laurinburg NC
Yes, why didn't they? Was each state different in it's restrictions on former Confederates voting? Or were thet the same across the former Confederacy?

How long was it before the KKK and Southern whites began restricting the black vote? Was it after Southerners got their voting rights back or before?

Curious.

Unionblue

You might want to consider that black militia gangs like the Union League did a better job of voter suppression than did the KKK and Union League during Radical Reconstruction.
 

unionblue

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Member of the Year
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Ocala, FL (as of December, 2015).
You might want to consider that black militia gangs like the Union League did a better job of voter suppression than did the KKK and Union League during Radical Reconstruction.

You might want to consider answering my questions.

Yes, why didn't they? Was each state different in it's restrictions on former Confederates voting? Or were thet the same across the former Confederacy?

How long was it before the KKK and Southern whites began restricting the black vote? Was it after Southerners got their voting rights back or before?

Curious.

Unionblue
 

CSA Today

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Dec 3, 2011
Location
Laurinburg NC
You might want to consider answering my questions.

It varied from state to state. Reconstruction was relatively mild in Virginia to harsh in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Arkansas. Black militias acted at the bidding of the individual state governments whoever controlled the militias controlled the government. Both militias and the Klan suppressed voting, who did the better job of voter suppression should be self-evident – especially in the white majorities states.
 

ForeverFree

Major
Joined
Feb 6, 2010
Location
District of Columbia
The Civil War ended in 1865-1866, depending on how you define the "end" of the war.

Reconstruction "ended" according to most people in 1877, with the end of US military occupation in the former Confederate states.

By or after 1877, and the completion of southern "home rule," the overwhelming number of white men had the franchise; as the post-Reconstruction era went on, the overwhelming number of black men (and later, black women) were denied the franchise. The denial of the franchise to African Americans lasted until the 1960s, some one hundred years after the war ended.

In his book The Era of Reconstruction 1867-1877, Kenneth M. Stampp wrote (p10-11)

How in fact were (white) southerners treated after the failure of their rebellion against the authority of the federal government? The great mass of ordinary Southerners who voluntarily took up arms, or in other ways supported the Confederacy simply had to take an oath of allegiance to obtain pardon and to regain their right to vote and hold public office.

But what about Confederate leaders... were there mass arrests, indictments for treason or conspiracy, trials and convictions, executions or imprisonments? Nothing of the sort. Officers of the Confederate army were paroled and sent home with their men.

Indeed, the only penalty imposed on most Confederate leaders was a temporary political disability provided in the Fourteenth amendment. But in 1872 Congress pardoned all but a handful of Southerners; and soon former Confederate civil and military leaders were serving as state governors, as members of Congress, and even as cabinet advisers of Presidents.

...In fact, it can be said that rarely in history have the participants in an unsuccessful rebellion endured penalties as mild as those the Congress imposed upon the people of the South, and particularly upon their leaders. After four years of struggle costing hundred of thousands of lives, the generosity of the federal government's terms were quite remarkable.
- Alan

 

unionblue

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Member of the Year
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Ocala, FL (as of December, 2015).
It varied from state to state. Reconstruction was relatively mild in Virginia to harsh in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Arkansas. Black militias acted at the bidding of the individual state governments whoever controlled the militias controlled the government. Both militias and the Klan suppressed voting, who did the better job of voter suppression should be self-evident – especially in the white majorities states.

I don't think the black militias did a very good job when you look at the longevity of them and the KKK and white redeemer state governments. After all, it took until the 1960s before black Americans began to regain their full voting rights, didn't it?
 

CSA Today

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Dec 3, 2011
Location
Laurinburg NC
I don't think the black militias did a very good job when you look at the longevity of them and the KKK and white redeemer state governments. After all, it took until the 1960s before black Americans began to regain their full voting rights, didn't it?

Uh, we're are discussing voting rights during Radical Reconstruction [1865-1877] not the 1960s. Is it your opinion that the white vote wasn't suppressed in the majority white Southern States? That the reason the carpetbaggers and scalawag weren't voted out of office was that the majority white population was happy as larks with their rule?
 

unionblue

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Member of the Year
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Ocala, FL (as of December, 2015).
Uh, we're are discussing voting rights during Radical Reconstruction [1865-1877] not the 1960s. Is it your opinion that the white vote wasn't suppressed in the majority white Southern States? That the reason the carpetbaggers and scalawag weren't voted out of office was that the majority white population was happy as larks with their rule?

I'm saying Southern whites got off far easier than Southern blacks in getting their right to vote back.
 
Top