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Welcome to the Stonewall Jackson Forum!

Discussion in 'Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson' started by James N., Mar 25, 2013.

  1. James N.

    James N. Captain Forum Host Civil War Photo Contest
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    I haven't been to the Smithsonian since 1964; at that time, if I remember correctly, the once coal-black Reinzi had faded to a disgusting pale YELLOW from having stood where he was daily in direct sunlight pouring in through a window or door. When did you see him, and what color was he? IF still on display, I sincerely hope the hide has been "conserved", including being dyed back to its original color; but since Civil War history and patriotism are passe in modern Washington, and SURELY there's nobody around who ever heard of Philip Henry Sheridan - much less his HORSE - I suppose it's been consigned to the same storage bin as the Lost Ark!
     

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  3. theoldman

    theoldman First Sergeant Trivia Game Winner

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    Hello James,
    I can't remember exactly when but my best guess is January of 2004. He looked good, with a shiny black coat, like he was fully alive, well groomed, and running in a charge. Someone must have done an excellent repair job on him. Speaking of General Sheridan, did you know he relieved General Gouveneur Warren during the pursuit of Lee from Petersburg? From the accounts I have read, the relief was totally uncalled for but Warren, the hero at Gettysburg, died a broken man because of it. I guess this could be a new thread? or even a new forum? I am not sure yet how to do those things here.
     
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  4. James N.

    James N. Captain Forum Host Civil War Photo Contest
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    You can't set up a new forum; that's the perogative of Mike, the site owner. But creating new topic threads are easy: Select the forum you think most appropriate for the subject you want to introduce, in this case maybe the Civil War General History Forum, and open its main or index page. At the top is a box, Start a New Thread - click on it and enjoy yourself!
     
  5. theoldman

    theoldman First Sergeant Trivia Game Winner

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    Thanks James. I think I'll read more to catch up with everyone. If I don't read first I think there is a good chance I will just be repeating something that has already been discussed.
     
  6. theoldman

    theoldman First Sergeant Trivia Game Winner

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    A week ago last Friday, May 10, I stopped by and visited the site of Jackson's wounding. Unfortunately for me I was with another couple and we had arranged to meet a third friend in Petersburg and tour the Petersburg Battlefield, so my time was limited at the site.
    2013-05-10 09.29.46.jpg This rock marks the spot where General Jackson was treated for his wounds.
     
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  7. BillO

    BillO Captain

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    Behind the visitors center is a path, go down that path about 25' and that is the approximate spot where he was shot. Or at least that is what one of the guys working there told me.
     
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  8. JPWalton

    JPWalton Sergeant

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    Such an unkind thing to say about Little Sorrel! :eek:

     
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  9. diane

    diane Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    Could be! :D Think Jackson acquired him at the beginning of the war near Harper's Ferry - there was a load of livestock on the train they stopped and he was supposed to get all the horses he could. Little Sorrel, a Morgan, and another larger horse were both bought by Jackson. He thought to keep the charger and give the Morgan to his wife. However, the charger proved unreliable and temperamental while Little Sorrel was easier in temper and long on endurance. He also seemed to think it was part of his job to take care of his odd ball master as well!
     
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  10. JPWalton

    JPWalton Sergeant

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    R.E. Thomas, the author of Stonewall Goes West, made what I thought was a moving point in his introduction about Jackson's death and so many counterfactual scenarios where he lives. He points out that the Virginia Wilderness -- scene of both Chancellorsville and the Wilderness, was a place that produced extremely violent and confused combat by its very nature. Not only was Jackson killed at Chancellorsville, but A.P. Hill was wounded upon assuming command, and Longstreet got himself shot doing pretty much the same thing Jackson was doing... but in daylight! Others in this thread have already described the carnage wrought by the friendly fire incident that mortally wounded Jackson -- many men and horses were wounded or killed.

    He believes that personally leading a nighttime reconnaissance party in conditions like that was bound to end in disaster. I personally think that when you look at the history of fighting in the Wilderness, you can draw no other conclusion. So, to not have Jackson get wounded that night, you either need to not have him leading that recon mission -- a very out of character thing for Old Blue Light to be doing, don't you think? -- or you need to betray the terrible nature of combat in the Virginia Wilderness... and that does a disservice to all the men who fell there.
     
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  11. JPWalton

    JPWalton Sergeant

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    Jackson was one of a number of Civil War generals who were bad horsemen, and needed a forgiving mount to get around.

     
  12. diane

    diane Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    He didn't have a lot of style and wasn't particularly a horse person. He'd learned to ride as a boy jockey - his uncles liked horse racing. That's why Jackson always had his stirrups hauled up to his chin! Good thing, maybe. One day Jackson was set to inspect his troops and came thundering past them at full gallop, grim-faced. They cheered, puzzled, then yelled - they realized Little Sorrel had run off with the general! :x3: Jackson eventually got control of Little Sorrel without either of them breaking their necks...
     
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  13. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Retired Moderator

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    In his later years, Little Sorrel was described both by Anna Jackson and others as "a character," and various other....uh....descriptive terms. Apparently he was one of those horses who loves a challenge...he would actually lift the rails off a fence until it was short enough for him to hop over....open gates....you name it. Sort of like my dad's cutting horse who flooded the entire stockyard at Slaton, Texas because he just couldn't rest until he broke the float valve loose on the water trough. :smile:
     
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  14. diane

    diane Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    They are funny - and outsmart us, too! There was an octopus who managed to flood an aquarium awhile back. Just had to know what that weird spinny looking thing above his tank was all about! :tongue:
     
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  15. Mason and Dixon

    Mason and Dixon Retired User

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    Greg.. that's a perfect summation.
    It seems like neurotic ppl are the hardest to be around in everyday life.. but they always make the most interesting historical figures :nerd: ~
     
  16. theoldman

    theoldman First Sergeant Trivia Game Winner

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    Yes, thanks for the reminder. I walked down the path to that marker. Just past the marker there is what looks like the remnants of Mountain Trail. I had to stop and orient myself on the directions from memory of the map I had seen of the shooting. 2013-05-10 09.35.41.jpg
     
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  17. theoldman

    theoldman First Sergeant Trivia Game Winner

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    Received Calamity at Chancellorsville, the wounding and death of Confederate General Stonewall Jackson. I did a quick skimming of the book and he has an Appendix (I) devoted to "Controversies Surrounding the Event". The first controversy he discusses is the location where the shooting occurred. He states, based on an analysis of the trajectory of the rounds that hit General Jackson, that Jackson had to be on the Plank Road. ........so the 'controversy' lives on.......more to come as I read more.
     
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  18. theoldman

    theoldman First Sergeant Trivia Game Winner

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    I have finished reading Calamity at Chancellorsville....and have very little news to report. The author, Matthew Lively is an M.D. and discusses the modern day medical reasons why General Jackson died. In 1863 all those modern day terms would have fallen under "pneumonia". One item along the health lines I did note was this author states clearly that Jackson only had 2 hours sleep the night of May 1 into the morning of May 2. The author further states, without any source listed, that Jackson complained of a head cold when he woke up early on May 2. After he was wounded it was also noted that the people on the scene had to cut through not only General Jackson's new coat, but also 2 shirts, indicating that Jackson felt chilled even though the weather was in the mid 60's or higher.

    The issue of the location is addressed in more detail in the narrative of the book. This author insists that the Jackson recon group went up Plank Road and returned down Plank Road, BUT when they heard firing to their south they moved into the tree line on the north side of the Road. Nearing their own lines Jackson turned into the woods and was riding at a diagonal line from Plank Road to his lines and that put him almost on Mountain Road when shot. His horse bolted when he was shot and ran about 50 yards up Mountain Trail before he was brought under control.

    Maybe one paragraph is used to describe how hard the flanking march was on the troops. The march is estimated to have been about 12 miles and when the lead elements reached the spot to launch the surprise attack on XI Corps right flank, it took another 2 hours to get the troops organized for the attack.

    The author indicated that Jackson and Hill knew that the NC 33 had been sent out as a picket line. This means that both recon parties knew they were between friendlies. The author admits he has no idea if either party made sure the units on the ground knew they were going out front. One possible explanation that I have is that the NC 18 and 28th were posted north of the road and the NC 7th and 37th south of the road. It is very possible that neither unit was given specific responsibility for the road itself. NC 18 had its right flank on the shoulder of the road on the north side.

    To be continued.............
     
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  19. James N.

    James N. Captain Forum Host Civil War Photo Contest
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    I still wonder how ( or why ) if his uniform and shirts were CUT OFF, the raincoat was removed in one piece??
     
  20. diane

    diane Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host

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    I would suspect it was because they didn't know the extent of the injury. That happened with Nelson's fatal wound - shot came down through the top of the shoulder. The coat is intact - just like Jackson's raincoat - but the rest of the clothes were cut off. There was also the problem of material being carried into the wound by the bullet. If the shirt or clothing article is removed by cutting and carefully lifted, there's less chance of something remaining in the wound and causing trouble later. That happened to N B Forrest when he was shot at Monterey. The bullet was eventually removed but there were still problems - turned out a piece of shirt was inside the wound. It had been missed because of the blood and so on.
     
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  21. theoldman

    theoldman First Sergeant Trivia Game Winner

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    At the time Jackson's clothing was cut away General Hill was on the scene. Hill supported Jackson's back and held his left arm while the signal officer, Captain Richard Wilbourn, cut away the sleeves of Jackson's clothing to expose the wound. The rain coat had been taken off General Jackson earlier.
     

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