We are at present here in George_town...

SHenley

Private
Joined
Apr 24, 2015
Location
Calgary, Alberta
A few lines from a letter my 3rd great-uncle Simeon Phillips wrote to my 2nd great-grandfather Jacob on August 4, 1863.

"We are at present here in George_town, guarding some runaways of different Regiments and perhaps we will remain here for some time. They have drafted here and in Washington today, but we have not heard the results of it yet. Write to me, wether they have drafted in your district or not. David and George Wilder, Vrooman and Lampman and my self are all well, they send their best respect to yours all."

After a few sentences discussing letters with other family members he ends his letter with "The weather here is hot enough to boil eggs in the road, and very little rain. Hoping these few lines will find yours all in good health. I remain with much respect your Brother S. Phillips."

Of the five men from the same area of New York state who are all serving in the same 153rd Infantry unit, only one survives his service. Although Simeon is listed as mustered out in the 153rd Roster, he died two weeks later on October 17, 1865 at David's Island.

Envelope (front) - S. Phillips to Jacob Phillips - August 4, 1863.jpg
Simeon Phillips.jpg
John Vrooman.jpg
George Wilder.jpg
David Wilder.jpg
Andrew Lampman.jpg
 

lupaglupa

2nd Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
Apr 18, 2019
It's wonderful you still have this! My husband's family are from that area in Montgomery County. Thanks for sharing.
 

JPK Huson 1863

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
Feb 14, 2012
Location
Central Pennsylvania
That is wonderful history. What duty does that mean he was on, does anyone know? Runaways from different regiments would be deserters, right? NOW I'd like to know if they were in a camp or maybe one of the various barracks around the city? That part of the letter would drive me a little crazy- would have to know!
 

SHenley

Private
Joined
Apr 24, 2015
Location
Calgary, Alberta
That is a great thought about investigating where they were actually located. I will have to do some more poking around.

My understanding is that the 153rd Infantry were on garrison duty, assigned to defend Washington.

The New York State Military History Museum has some information extracted from two documents published in the early 1900's. According to their web page at the time this letter was written the 153rd was "in Casey's Division, 22d Corps, from February, 1863".

https://dmna.ny.gov/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/153rdInf/153rdInfMain.htm
The Wikipedia page has some other references, and the snippets I posted about the men are from the 153rd Infantry Civil War roster in the Report of the Adjutant General.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/153rd_New_York_Volunteer_Infantry
 

SHenley

Private
Joined
Apr 24, 2015
Location
Calgary, Alberta
It's wonderful you still have this! My husband's family are from that area in Montgomery County. Thanks for sharing.
On the off chance any of this letter might have any other connections, this is the image of the main part of the letter with the family gossip.

I spent some time digging into the Rubbins/Phillips part of my family tree in New York state around five years ago but haven't really done much research into the rest of the Phillips siblings in the area. Jacob, the recipient of the letter, is my 2nd great-grandfather who married a Rubbins sister of the brothers whose pictures I have posted in the forum. My great-grandmother Nettie Ann (Phillips) Henly was born in Fairfield and spent her early days in Little Falls.

I believe one of the Phillips sisters married a Casady, and I think there may be a connection to one of the Schuyler family lines. Of course, the sentence that suggests Simeon may have sent a ring to a possible lady friend has an indecipherable name. :smile:
Page 2:3 - S. Phillips to Jacob Phillips.jpg
 

lupaglupa

2nd Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
Apr 18, 2019
There's a lot of old Dutch names in that area - Vrooman and Schuyler being among them.
 
Top