Was your ancestor treated at US General Hospital in Baton Rouge?

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#1
Hi all -

My gg-grandfather Joseph Seely Dolson (161st NY Volunteer Infantry, detached) was chief surgeon at the US General Hospital in Baton Rouge from about 17 Dec 1862 to 23 Jul 1863.

I would be very interested in hear from anyone who has researched individuals who spent time in the hospital or were treated by Dr. Dolson. I have many of his letters, some of which mention patient names (often just last name and rank) and would be happy to search for your ancestor or person of interest, and would be happy to share what knowledge I have of the hospital (which is not especially extensive).

Cheers -

Rob

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ExNavyPilot

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#2
Robreuss--
Unfortunately I don't have any info on your ancestor or the Baton Rouge hospital; my ancestors who passed through Louisiana stayed healthy (enough), while the ones who were hospitalized were up in Virginia or Missouri. However, I do have one tie-in to your post: I was born in Alta Bates hospital in Berkeley and grew up in Hayward. I now live in Virginia, so let me say welcome aboard the forum from Hampton Roads.
I'm sure that in time, someone will come forward with some information on their ancestor who encountered your gg-grandfather. Meanwhile, enjoy your time on the forum.
 
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#3
Robreuss--
Unfortunately I don't have any info on your ancestor or the Baton Rouge hospital; my ancestors who passed through Louisiana stayed healthy (enough), while the ones who were hospitalized were up in Virginia or Missouri. However, I do have one tie-in to your post: I was born in Alta Bates hospital in Berkeley and grew up in Hayward. I now live in Virginia, so let me say welcome aboard the forum from Hampton Roads.
I'm sure that in time, someone will come forward with some information on their ancestor who encountered your gg-grandfather. Meanwhile, enjoy your time on the forum.
Thanks for the kind welcome, ExNavyPilot. I am about a mile from Alta Bates - I know well where it is.

I'm going to go ahead and modify my profile to present my full list of ancestors and other veterans of the war I'm researching. Are those all relatives of yours? That's quite a roster.
 

Robtweb1

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I'm going to have to check on something. My wife's great-great-grandfather was in the 2nd Louisiana Cav. It seems I read something about him being wounded and captured during the fighting in South Louisiana and treated at a federal hospital either in Baton Rouge or New Orleans. I'll get back with you.

P. S. My great-grandfather was a surgeon for the CSA.
 

ExNavyPilot

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#5
I'm going to go ahead and modify my profile to present my full list of ancestors and other veterans of the war I'm researching. Are those all relatives of yours? That's quite a roster.
Three are direct ancestors (two gg-grandfathers, one ggg-grandfather) and ten are brothers of direct ancestors (eight gg-granduncles and two ggg-granduncles.) As of yet I've found no Confederate ancestors but I'm still digging...
 
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#6
I'm going to have to check on something. My wife's great-great-grandfather was in the 2nd Louisiana Cav. It seems I read something about him being wounded and captured during the fighting in South Louisiana and treated at a federal hospital either in Baton Rouge or New Orleans. I'll get back with you.

P. S. My great-grandfather was a surgeon for the CSA.
I'd be very curious to hear about your wifes gg-grandfather. I don't recall any specific mention of my grandfather treating any CSA soldiers in his letter, but I would need to double check. He did treat the families of Baton Rouge on a number of occasions, and one of the families returned the kindness by caring for him during a sickness. If your wife's ancestors were treated in the General Hospital in Baton Rouge, I support there may not be any records at all. In the case of Union troops, I can pursue the records of the service/pension records of the individual to see if there are any surgeon certificates from my grandfather, but would the same be possible with the CSA? I know nothing about researching soldiers of the CSA.

Also, very interesting that your gg-grandfather was a surgeon in the CSA. Do you have much info on his service?
 
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#7
Three are direct ancestors (two gg-grandfathers, one ggg-grandfather) and ten are brothers of direct ancestors (eight gg-granduncles and two ggg-granduncles.) As of yet I've found no Confederate ancestors but I'm still digging...
That's a pretty big collection - bigger than mine. :smile:

A quick scan of your ancestor list seems to suggest most survived the war - is that the case?

Unfortunately, all my Union soldier ancestors, with the exception of my gg-grandfather, did not survive, 2 dying of disease from being wounded, and one of disease.

I have no CSA ancestors and likely will not find any - entire family was based pretty far north, and nobody in the border states.
 

ExNavyPilot

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#8
On the whole, my Union ancestors were lucky. Two died of disease soon after the Peninsula campaign (chronic diarrhea and typhoid fever) and three were discharged for disability within a few months of mustering, one of which remained sick and died not long afterwards. The remainder survived; two served 1 year, four served 3 years, one served 3.5 years, and one served just under 5 years (57 months). Only one was wounded (slightly), despite several seeing heavy action.
 
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#9
ExNavyPilot - Any idea what the "discharge for disability" meant - results of camp diseases? Did any of your NY relatives muster in at Elmira? My gg-grandfather did, and was overwhelmed with sick soldiers, often treating on his own - I think about 800 got sick there.
 

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I'd be very curious to hear about your wifes gg-grandfather. I don't recall any specific mention of my grandfather treating any CSA soldiers in his letter, but I would need to double check. He did treat the families of Baton Rouge on a number of occasions, and one of the families returned the kindness by caring for him during a sickness. If your wife's ancestors were treated in the General Hospital in Baton Rouge, I support there may not be any records at all. In the case of Union troops, I can pursue the records of the service/pension records of the individual to see if there are any surgeon certificates from my grandfather, but would the same be possible with the CSA? I know nothing about researching soldiers of the CSA.

Also, very interesting that your gg-grandfather was a surgeon in the CSA. Do you have much info on his service?
The process for researching medical records for CSA soldiers is pretty much the same as that of researching a union soldier. Everything is in the National Archives in Washington, but a lot of that is now available on the internet.

I wrote a book about my great-grandfather's war service. Click on the link in my signature.
 
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#12
The process for researching medical records for CSA soldiers is pretty much the same as that of researching a union soldier. Everything is in the National Archives in Washington, but a lot of that is now available on the internet.

I wrote a book about my great-grandfather's war service. Click on the link in my signature.
That's helpful to know, about NARA. Do you know if the CSA would accept a Union Surgeon's certificate to release a soldier from duty, and therefore put the certificate in the file? Do you see Union Surgeon reports in CSA records?

I'll check out your book. How did you obtain Dr. Aragon's letters - were they passed down?
 

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That's helpful to know, about NARA. Do you know if the CSA would accept a Union Surgeon's certificate to release a soldier from duty, and therefore put the certificate in the file? Do you see Union Surgeon reports in CSA records?

I'll check out your book. How did you obtain Dr. Aragon's letters - were they passed down?
I personally haven't dug that deep into what you are asking about, but someone here will know.

About the letters, it's an interesting story. The entire family died during the yellow fever epidemic of 1878, with the exception of my grandmother, who was De Aragon's daughter. She hung on to all the letters he wrote during the war. When she died in 1949, my mother and several of my aunts were cleaning out her possessions, and one of my aunts just started piling things up in the yard and started a fire. My mother saw all the letters in there and rescued what she could. They are now in the possession of myself and several of my cousins.
 
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#14
About the letters, it's an interesting story. The entire family died during the yellow fever epidemic of 1878, with the exception of my grandmother, who was De Aragon's daughter. She hung on to all the letters he wrote during the war. When she died in 1949, my mother and several of my aunts were cleaning out her possessions, and one of my aunts just started piling things up in the yard and started a fire. My mother saw all the letters in there and rescued what she could. They are now in the possession of myself and several of my cousins.
What a great story, although a little disturbing to think that some may have been lost. I know of at least one major house fire where significant family records were lost in the 1920s, although in that case unrelated to the war. I had the good fortunate to come across, online, my gg-grantfather's Civil War archive held at Dartmouth College, and was able to get a copy of the materials. It was quite a remarkable thing, given that I knew relatively little about him and his wife at the time, to read through the letters.
 
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#15
Hi all -

My gg-grandfather Joseph Seely Dolson (161st NY Volunteer Infantry, detached) was chief surgeon at the US General Hospital in Baton Rouge from about 17 Dec 1862 to 23 Jul 1863.

I would be very interested in hear from anyone who has researched individuals who spent time in the hospital or were treated by Dr. Dolson. I have many of his letters, some of which mention patient names (often just last name and rank) and would be happy to search for your ancestor or person of interest, and would be happy to share what knowledge I have of the hospital (which is not especially extensive).

Cheers -

Rob

View attachment 8117
Hello Rob,

According to a letter (http://ny131st.tripod.com/131hist2.htm) from his captain (Francis Howell), my gg-grandfather (John Wengert or Wingert, NY 131st Infantry, Co.E) died at the "general hospital" in Baton Rouge of typhoid fever on 11 Jan 1863. Any reference in the letters to him?

Thanks,
George
 

lelliott19

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Welcome @robreuss! Glad to have you aboard. Like @Robtweb1 my gg grandfather (avatar) was a Surgeon for the CSA.

William C. Cross, appointed Surgeon, 16th Alabama Infantry October 30, 1861, date of confirmation, April 4, 1863, stationed at Beech Grove, Kentucky December, 1861; absent sick June 28, 1862. June 6, 1864, "Appointed a member of Examination Board of Gamble Hospital to examine all patients in the hospital and report such as all able for duty, especial attention as to the fitness of officers for duty is directed," relieved from duty at Newman, Ga.. August 16/18, 1864, and report to Bragg Hospital at Americus, Ga. for duty, posted to an Army of Tennessee hospital at Meridian, Mississippi February 1865, gave his Parole of Honor to the United States May 12, 1865 at Meridian, MississippiM331 Compiled Service Records of Confederate General and Staff Officers, and Nonregimental Enlisted Men


Wm C Cross, of Cherokee, Colbert county was appointed surgeon of the Sixteenth in October, 1861 and was promoted to senior surgeon of the brigade in the spring of 1862 while at Corinth. He remained with the wounded at Perryville; was transferred to hospital duty in the spring of 1863, and remained on duty at Newnan, Ga., until near the close of the war. A brother surgeon who knew him in service, intimately says, "he is a fine physician, a devoted friend, a true patriot, and an elegant gentleman." ~ from Early Settlers of Alabama Part 1, James Edmund Saunders, 1899. Pages 174-175.

Dr Cross was serving as Senior Surgeon of Woods Brigade at Shiloh, choosing the Mickey House as the location for the Brigade Hospital. see more info here http://civilwartalk.com/threads/photo-and-location-of-mickey-house.106189/#post-986626

One thing that may be interesting to you about Confederate Hospitals .....they moved around as the need indicated and as the Union advance continued into previously 'safe' areas. They werent really hospitals in the traditional sense. Just a collection of staff and supplies that moved (usually by rail) to where they were needed, threw down some clean straw on the floor of whatever building they could find, and set up as best they could to care for the sick and wounded. Nothing like the actual hospital facility where your ancestor served.

After Shiloh, Dr Cross was assigned to the Bragg Hospital which was located in Corinth MS, Canton MS, Chattanooga TN, Ringgold GA, Newnan GA, Americus GA, Marion AL, Livingston AL, and Meridian MS (not necessarily in that order) They got very good at packing up and moving from place to place.

My husbands gg grandfather served in the 16th Georgia Infantry. He was killed in action at the Bloody Angle. I have done work in the records of his Regiment and have run across carded records for Confederates treated at Union Hospitals, but none from the USA General Hospital in Baton Rouge. If I happen across any, I will be sure to let you know.
 
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#17
Hello Rob,

According to a letter (http://ny131st.tripod.com/131hist2.htm) from his captain (Francis Howell), my gg-grandfather (John Wengert or Wingert, NY 131st Infantry, Co.E) died at the "general hospital" in Baton Rouge of typhoid fever on 11 Jan 1863. Any reference in the letters to him?

Thanks,
George
Welcome to Civil War Talk.

Baton Rouge is a very interesting and often overlooked part of the War.
 
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#18
Welcome to Civil War Talk.

Baton Rouge is a very interesting and often overlooked part of the War.
Hi all -

My gg-grandfather Joseph Seely Dolson (161st NY Volunteer Infantry, detached) was chief surgeon at the US General Hospital in Baton Rouge from about 17 Dec 1862 to 23 Jul 1863.

I would be very interested in hear from anyone who has researched individuals who spent time in the hospital or were treated by Dr. Dolson. I have many of his letters, some of which mention patient names (often just last name and rank) and would be happy to search for your ancestor or person of interest, and would be happy to share what knowledge I have of the hospital (which is not especially extensive).

Cheers -

Rob

View attachment 8117

My ancestor, John Middleton Nall, of Co H 19th Texas Infantry was treated at USA General Hospital in Baton Rouge from a gunshot wound he received at Fort DeRussy where he was captured and taken to New Orleans. In his file is a Medical Card with the following number 1787156. It also says he was able to return to duty 30 April 1864 He was then turned into the Provost Marhsall. Do you have any information on him?
 
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#19
Hi Rob,

I wonder if you have any info on my gggg grandfather, William Henry Grosfriend. He was a part of the 161st New York and died of typhoid fever in Baton Rouge. His last name is spelled subtlety different depending on the source. He was in Co. D.

He is buried in the Baton Rouge National Cemetery.

Thanks,

Ron
 

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#20
Hi all -

My gg-grandfather Joseph Seely Dolson (161st NY Volunteer Infantry, detached) was chief surgeon at the US General Hospital in Baton Rouge from about 17 Dec 1862 to 23 Jul 1863.

I would be very interested in hear from anyone who has researched individuals who spent time in the hospital or were treated by Dr. Dolson. I have many of his letters, some of which mention patient names (often just last name and rank) and would be happy to search for your ancestor or person of interest, and would be happy to share what knowledge I have of the hospital (which is not especially extensive).

Cheers -

Rob

View attachment 8117
Wow Rob, very cool.. my cousin Lyman Gunn of the 91st NY was mortally wounded late May, 1863 and the fam gealogy book says just "died July 1st at hopsital, Baton Rouge."

Would be amazing to learn more .. thanks, clay
 



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