Was the Civil War fought in Arizona?

CMWinkler

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#1
Was the Civil War fought in Arizona?
Mark Nothaft, Special for The Republic | azcentral.com 5:06 a.m. MT Jan. 17, 2017
Only in Arizona: Union troops from California clashed with Confederate forces storming across the Southwest at Picacho Pass April 15, 1862, about 50 miles north of Tucson


(Photo: Arizona State Parks)

We usually envision blue and gray armies battling it out east of Arizona when we think of the American Civil War, between the North and South way far away from the Grand Canyon and desert Southwest. Over yonder, past Texas. Not here.

More: http://www.azcentral.com/story/news...2017/01/17/civil-war-fought-arizona/96539922/
 

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#7
The 'Battle' of Picacho Pass was little more than a skirmish between elements of the California Column moving in from the west, and Captain Sherrod Hunter's 'Arizona Rangers' from Mesilla, Arizona Territory CSA (Yes folks, that's a 'thing.') The Unionists suffered defeat at this skirmish, and their advance was stalled for at least 3 to 4 weeks.

On the Confederate side of things, while they occupied the settlement of Tucson, they found themselves having to act as both civil authorities and military. On the 5th of May, whilst Mexican farmers were busy giving 'what for' to the French Army at Puebla, Confederates, were gathering feral cattle, were attacked by Apache at the site of the Dragoon Springs Butterfield Stage Station some 50 miles east of Tucson. Four members of the Confederate detail were killed, and their graves are still there, not far from the ruins of the stage stop, commemorated by a marker. These were the only Confederate casualties in present day Arizona.
 
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#8
Got to visit the site a few years ago. Not a lot there but interesting nonetheless.
You know the actual battle site is across the freeway and RR tracks where there is a crappy out rocking. That's where the Confederates we're gambling when over taken by the Yankee Cavalry Patrol. The Yankee Lt. is still buried out there I believe. There used to be a marker but vandals did their bit.

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#9
At the time the States ( New Mexico territories)ofand Arizona were one on top the other so southern Arizona and New Mexico were Confederate. The Northern parts were not really declared. When Nevada became a State it got a piece of Arizona. They won the ruling because Arizona was Confederate during the War. Post War Arizona Territory was founded by members of that California Column. One Confederate Lt. who switched sides when the Texans went home founded Phoenix. In Flagstaff the Doctor up here was named Manning. Son of General Peyton Manning of Bragg's Artillery. He was a Sgt. His good friend up here was Ben Doney of Doney Park fame. Doney was a U.S. Sailor on the Benton and captured a streamer from a Confederate ship. Pioneer Museum has the streamer and Ben Doney's cabin on site. I think Doc Manning's grave is the only one that gets a Confederate flag on it in the local Cemetery. Commodore Perry Owens is buried here also.
Arizona has a Southern History from before the War and after Yank and Reb both came out West and often left the past behind. Doney and Manning tried passing laws to ease taxes on the local prostitutes and liquer operations. Very Civic Minded they were.
Manning had his arm ruined in a gunfight with a Lawman out in Texas. Manning got shot and his brother killed the lawman. Arizona Territory seemed very nice all the sudden I bet. I can't spell the lawman's same. German sounding. Starts with an S and ends in a Mayer or something. Fairly famous chap. That Historian Metz from the History Channel wrote a book about him.
 

diane

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#11
At the time the States ( New Mexico territories)ofand Arizona were one on top the other so southern Arizona and New Mexico were Confederate. The Northern parts were not really declared. When Nevada became a State it got a piece of Arizona. They won the ruling because Arizona was Confederate during the War. Post War Arizona Territory was founded by members of that California Column. One Confederate Lt. who switched sides when the Texans went home founded Phoenix. In Flagstaff the Doctor up here was named Manning. Son of General Peyton Manning of Bragg's Artillery. He was a Sgt. His good friend up here was Ben Doney of Doney Park fame. Doney was a U.S. Sailor on the Benton and captured a streamer from a Confederate ship. Pioneer Museum has the streamer and Ben Doney's cabin on site. I think Doc Manning's grave is the only one that gets a Confederate flag on it in the local Cemetery. Commodore Perry Owens is buried here also.
Arizona has a Southern History from before the War and after Yank and Reb both came out West and often left the past behind. Doney and Manning tried passing laws to ease taxes on the local prostitutes and liquer operations. Very Civic Minded they were.
Manning had his arm ruined in a gunfight with a Lawman out in Texas. Manning got shot and his brother killed the lawman. Arizona Territory seemed very nice all the sudden I bet. I can't spell the lawman's same. German sounding. Starts with an S and ends in a Mayer or something. Fairly famous chap. That Historian Metz from the History Channel wrote a book about him.
Dallas Stoudenmire is who you're thinking of! El Paso, he passed... Doc Manning was another medical man raised in the Deep South who became a famous gunman in Arizona. Must've been the air!
 
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#12
Dallas Stoudenmire is who you're thinking of! El Paso, he passed... Doc Manning was another medical man raised in the Deep South who became a famous gunman in Arizona. Must've been the air!
That's the guy. I knew I would never remember the spelling.
 

gary

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#13
Lest we forget, there's the Battle of Novato in California. Unionists from Mare Island (by Vallejo) took up arms to march against the Confederate sympathizers in Santa Rosa. When the Unionist reached Novato, they stopped at a tavern for some cold brewskis. That's as far as they got.

A group of Southern sympathizers were trying to leave California and went south from San Jose. They were intercepted and taken into custody with a shot.

There was a Confederate plot to steal a steamship that would carry California gold to the East Coast.

Perhaps the most significant thing is the expenses California incurred was never reimbursed by the Federal Government after the war. Even Texas got some reimbursement after the war.
 

John Hartwell

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#15
Yeah. I thought he had that in mind in the Civil War scene from "The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly."
That's the one with the sandbagged "Gatling-gun-nests" and entrenched heavy artillery (Columbiads, I believe) out in the desert fighting over a rickety bridge across a creek you could wade without getting your belt wet.
sceptik1-1970e7b.jpg
 
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#16
Unfortunately, the annual Civil War in the Southwest event, held at Picacho Peak State Park, was cancelled this year. AZ State Parks claimed it operated at a loss, and would only continue the event if a sponsor could be found to underwrite the event. Funny thing... Colorado River State Historic Park (formerly Yuma Quatermaster Depot SHP; formerly, formerly Yuma Crossing SHP) IS holding their Civil War Days event (January 26 - 27, 2019.)

Same state, same agency. Kinda makes one wonder.
 

BlueandGrayl

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#17
Well there was also the Battle of Glorieta Pass fought in nearby New Mexico and it was the most important battle in the Southwest portion of the Civil War more so than what you mentioned in Arizona.
 

Brendan

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#18
The 'Battle' of Picacho Pass was little more than a skirmish between elements of the California Column moving in from the west, and Captain Sherrod Hunter's 'Arizona Rangers' from Mesilla, Arizona Territory CSA (Yes folks, that's a 'thing.') The Unionists suffered defeat at this skirmish, and their advance was stalled for at least 3 to 4 weeks.

On the Confederate side of things, while they occupied the settlement of Tucson, they found themselves having to act as both civil authorities and military. On the 5th of May, whilst Mexican farmers were busy giving 'what for' to the French Army at Puebla, Confederates, were gathering feral cattle, were attacked by Apache at the site of the Dragoon Springs Butterfield Stage Station some 50 miles east of Tucson. Four members of the Confederate detail were killed, and their graves are still there, not far from the ruins of the stage stop, commemorated by a marker. These were the only Confederate casualties in present day Arizona.
Picacho Pass might be the only "battle" which draws more reenactors than there were participants in the real thing!
 

James N.

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#19
Well there was also the Battle of Glorieta Pass fought in nearby New Mexico and it was the most important battle in the Southwest portion of the Civil War more so than what you mentioned in Arizona.
True, but it wasn't as far west!
 


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