Was Sheridan's Relief of Warren after the Battle of Five Forks Justified?

Was Sheridan's relief of Warren after the Battle of Five Forks justified?

  • Yes, it was justified

    Votes: 3 13.6%
  • No, it was not justified

    Votes: 19 86.4%

  • Total voters
    22

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Eric Wittenberg

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Jun 2, 2013
Messages
3,287
Location
Columbus, OH
#22
Is there any sympathy for Warren? My understanding is that Grant/Meade got fed up largely because he was overly reflective and imposed some of his judgment to postpone attacks he thought would fail. But is that entirely a bad thing in a stage of the war where any attack on prepared positions was most likely to be a bloody disaster? Esp w/ the ANV who had gotten quite good at it bloodying Grant throughout the Overland Campaign, most painfully at Cold Harbor. If Warren had done the same thing and said no to Burnside at F-berg, wouldn't he be seen as a hero instead of a royal pain in Grant's side?
I have a vast amount of sympathy for Warren. He was the victim of a manifest injustice at the hands of lying little narcissist. He should have been relieved for the good of the service months earlier. But the specific reason for his relief on April 1, 1865 were found by a court of inquiry to have been unjust, and that injustice robbed him of the opportunity to lead his men up Pennsylvania Avenue during the Grand Review after the surrender at Appomattox.
 
Joined
May 18, 2011
Messages
9,423
Location
Carlisle, PA
#23
I have a vast amount of sympathy for Warren. He was the victim of a manifest injustice at the hands of lying little narcissist. He should have been relieved for the good of the service months earlier. But the specific reason for his relief on April 1, 1865 were found by a court of inquiry to have been unjust, and that injustice robbed him of the opportunity to lead his men up Pennsylvania Avenue during the Grand Review after the surrender at Appomattox.
Exactly. Warren could have been, and probably should have been, relieved at the end of the Overland Campaign or during the Petersburg Campaign when his performances were lackluster at best. But what happened in April 1865 was unjustified.

Ryan
 

Irishtom29

First Sergeant
Joined
Jul 21, 2008
Messages
1,511
Location
San Antonio
#24
Exactly. Warren could have been, and probably should have been, relieved at the end of the Overland Campaign or during the Petersburg Campaign when his performances were lackluster at best. But what happened in April 1865 was unjustified.

Ryan
I think his previous poor performance justified his being relieved any time it suited his superiors to do so. He wasn’t even fired, he still had a job.

And he was in management, not some poor common soldier getting a raw deal. You know, like getting killed.
 

Jamieva

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Feb 7, 2006
Messages
4,065
Location
Midlothian, VA
#25
I think his previous poor performance justified his being relieved any time it suited his superiors to do so. He wasn’t even fired, he still had a job.

And he was in management, not some poor common soldier getting a raw deal. You know, like getting killed.
But his superiors didn't. They left it up in the air at the decision of a minion. If Grant or Meade had the moral conviction to jettison him they should have done so themselves directly. The fact that they passed it off to Sheridan to pass judgment is just passing the buck
 

Irishtom29

First Sergeant
Joined
Jul 21, 2008
Messages
1,511
Location
San Antonio
#26
But his superiors didn't. They left it up in the air at the decision of a minion. If Grant or Meade had the moral conviction to jettison him they should have done so themselves directly. The fact that they passed it off to Sheridan to pass judgment is just passing the buck
Evidently Sheridan was his superior. And being the man on the spot he exercised his authority on the spot. Seems to me to be a sensible delegation of authority to give a combat group commander the authority to relieve his subordinates.

Late in war old structures such as Army of the Potomac, Army of the Cumberland, Army of the James etc. were breaking down in favor of ad hoc combat groups made up from various armies. Such as Thomas’s army at Nashville which had one corps of the old Army of the Cumberland, the corps which had been the Army of the Ohio, AJ Smith’s wandering group from the Army of the Tennessee and various other available troops. Grant used Sheridan as such a combat group commander and gave him authority over those troops he used regardless of what army or department they belonged to.
 
Joined
Jul 31, 2005
Messages
371
#27



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