Was it Brownlow's fault that the KKK was formed

nitrofd

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Jan 20, 2013
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north central florida
Can you provide a link?
The version I found on Amazon, William Gannaway Brownlow, Americanism Contrasted with Foreignism, Romanism, and Bogus Democracy in the Light of Reason, History, and Scripture; In which Certain Demagogues in Tennessee, ... are Shown Up in Their True Colors, has 375 pages.
See https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004UK17SA/?tag=civilwartalkc-20
I see you problem as I can not find the link at Amazon now,but fear not I found how you van get it.
Go to Google and type this in...Portrait and Biography of Parson Brownlow,The Tennessee Patriot....
It should be the second listing saying amazon kindle.
 

WJC

Major General
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Answered the Call for Reinforcements
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Aug 16, 2015
I see you problem as I can not find the link at Amazon now,but fear not I found how you van get it.
Go to Google and type this in...Portrait and Biography of Parson Brownlow,The Tennessee Patriot....
It should be the second listing saying amazon kindle.
Thanks for your response.
Following your suggestion, I found the book at https://archive.org/details/portraitandbiog00browgoog
Should be an interesting read....
 

leftyhunter

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los angeles ca
You may mean Hind not Hindman.

Hindman fled to Mexico after the war and when he returned he became active in Democrat politics. He opposed the Radicals and was assassinated in his home by a sniper. Since ex-Confederates were disenfranchised in Arkansas, he had attempted to recruit negro voters for the conservatives. That was thought to be the reason for his murder. No one was ever convicted although a black man confessed years later. The killing was said to be revenge for KKK activities. Hindman lived for several hours after being shot and made a speech from his porch urging peace and forgiveness.
I will have to find the quote. I would not put to much stock in a black man confessing to a murder of a white man in the South. It was not unknown to beat blacks to obtain confessions.
Leftyhunter
 
Joined
Mar 25, 2014
I will have to find the quote. I would not put to much stock in a black man confessing to a murder of a white man in the South. It was not unknown to beat blacks to obtain confessions.
Leftyhunter

Hind was a Republican congressman from Arkansas who was killed by George Clark in 1868 while campaigning for Grant. Clark was said to be a member of the KKK.

Hindman's murder was also thought to be a political assassination. He was a former congressman and a Democrat who at the time of his death was aligned with the conservatives. Conservatives had launched on a campaign to recruit black voters in Arkansas and Tennessee.

The confession was not coerced. In fact it was not pursued because it was thought to be a false braggadocio.
 

R Black

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Jan 11, 2015
I might add that without Parson Brownlow's extreme views and actions against the former Confederates, that the thing wouldn't have gotten off the first floor because decent men like Forrest would not have seen a need to join it. His farewell message to his troops shows he had every intention of following the law of the land and being a loyal citizen, encouraging his men to do the same. They expected to be treated as loyal citizens after they'd done all required of them to regain that status. Didn't work out that way by a long shot.
I’ve come to the conclusion that Parson Brownlow, in part, is the reason
I might add that without Parson Brownlow's extreme views and actions against the former Confederates, that the thing wouldn't have gotten off the first floor because decent men like Forrest would not have seen a need to join it. His farewell message to his troops shows he had every intention of following the law of the land and being a loyal citizen, encouraging his men to do the same. They expected to be treated as loyal citizens after they'd done all required of them to regain that status. Didn't work out that way by a long shot.
I’ve come to the conclusion that Parson Brownlow is a big reason that I was born in California. My 2nd Great Grandfather fled Eastern Tennessee after the war, I’m assuming on account of Brownlow’s treatment of remaining Confederates. He ended up in Texas. His descendants came west during the late 1920’s...and here I am. But I’ve often wondered how different it might have been had Brownlow not been so punitive.
 
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