★ ★  Warren, Gouverneur K.

Gouverneur Kemble Warren

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Born:
January 8, 1830

Birthplace: Cold Spring, New York

Father: Sylvanus Warren 1799 – 1859
(Buried: Mountain Avenue Cemetery, Cold Spring, New York)​

Mother: Phebe Lickley 1804 – 1870
(Buried: Mountain Avenue Cemetery, Cold Spring, New York)​

Wife: Emily Forbes Chase 1840 – 1928
(Buried: Island Cemetery, Newport, Rhode Island)​

Children:

Algernon Sydney Warren 1866 – 1907​
(Buried: Island Cemetery, Newport, Rhode Island)​
Emily Braem Warren 1875 – 1965​
(Buried: Island Cemetery, Newport, Rhode Island)​

Education:

1850: Graduated from West Point Military Academy – (2nd in class)​

Occupation before War:

1850 – 1854: Brevet 2nd Lt, U. S. Army Topographical Engineers​
1850 – 1852: Assistant Topographical Engineer, Mississippi Delta​
1852 – 1853: Member Board of Improvement Canal Falls of Ohio​
1853 - 1854: In charge of studies improvement of Rock Island​
1854 – 1856: 2nd Lt. United States Army Topographical Engineers​
1855: Chief Topographical Engineer on Sioux Expedition​
1856 – 1861: 1st Lt., United States Army Topographical Engineers​
1858 – 1882: Member American Advancement of Sciences​
1859: Assistant Math Professor at West Point Military Academy
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1859 – 1861: Principal Assist. Math Professor at West Point​

Civil War Career:

1861: Lt. Colonel 5th New York Volunteers Infantry Regiment​
1861 – 1862: Served in the Defenses of Baltimore, Maryland​
1861 – 1862: Helped build Fort on Federal Hill​
1861 – 1862: Colonel 5th New York Volunteers Infantry Regiment​
1861 – 1863: Captain United States Army Topographical Engineers​
1862: Served in the Siege of Yorktown, Virginia​
1862: Bruised on the knee by spent shell at Battle of Gaines Mill​
1862: Brevetted Lt. Colonel for his role at Battle of Gaines Mill​
1862: Served in the Battle of Malvern Hill, Virginia​
1862: Served in the Second Battle of Bull Run, Virginia​
1862: Served in the Battle of Antietam, Maryland​
1862 – 1863: Brigadier General Union Army Volunteers​
1862: Served in the march to Falmouth, Virginia​
1862 – 1863: Served in the Rappahannock Campaign​
1863 – 1864: Captain, United States Army Engineers Corps​
1863 – 1865: Major General, Union Army Volunteers​
1863: Chief Engineer of the Union Army of the Potomac​
1863: Wounded slightly in the throat by musket ball at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania​
1863: Brevetted Colonel for Gallantry at Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania​
1863 – 1864: Commander of Second Army Corps, Army of the Potomac​
1863: Union Army Commander at the Battle of Bristoe Station, Virginia​
1864 – 1865: Commander of Fifth Army Corps, Army of the Potomac​
1864: Served in the Battle of the Wilderness, Virginia​
1864 – 1879: Major, United States Army Corps of Engineers​
1865: Brevetted Brigadier General for Battle of Bristoe Station, Virginia​
1865: Brevetted Major General for Service in the War​
1865 – 1866: in New York City Preparing Maps and Reports of the war​
1865: Resigned as Major General on May 27th

Occupation after War:

1864 – 1879: Major United States Army Corps of Engineers​
1866: Member of Board of Engineers to examine Washington Canal​
1866 – 1870: Superintendent Engineer Improvements Upper Mississippi​
1868–1869: Superintendent Engineer Survey of Gettysburg Battlefield​
1870 – 1882: Surveys and Improvements for New England States​
1876 – 1882: Member of National Academy of Sciences​
1878 – 1879: Superintendent Engineer Survey of Groveton, Virginia
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1879: Preparing Campaign Maps for the Army of the Potomac​
1879 – 1882: Lt. Colonel United States Army Corps of Engineers​

Died: August 8, 1882

Place of Death: Newport, Rhode Island

Cause of Death: Diabetes mellitus

Age at time of Death: 52 years old

Burial Place: Island Cemetery, Newport, Rhode Island

FOR FURTHER READING
 
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John Hartwell

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Location
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Be it noted that if that last sentence was accurate, it was particularly tragic, in that the Court of Inquiry fully exonerated Gen. Warren for his conduct at the battle of Five Forks. His dismissal by Gen. Sheridan was judged to have been unjustified. The final verdict was not made public until after his death.
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[Boston Globe, 9 August 1882]​
 
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