Warner Revolving Rifles

LouG.

Private
Joined
Jun 27, 2021
Here's an interesting item from the daily "Nashville Patriot" of 14 May 1861:

"The Tenth District Home Guards received yesterday a shipment of 70 revolving rifles, Warner's Patent, from the Springfield, Mass., Arms Manufactory. These guns are of the best quality, and are admirable for the purposes intended. Capt. J. M. Hawkins, can now boast of one of the best equipped home companies in the State. In reply to the question to Capt. H., how he got the rifles from Springfield, Mass., he placed his index finger in the corner of his left eye, and said, "that is the question." We asked if there were any "more left of the same sort," to which he replied "nary one." So far as we are concerned, therefore, the Springfield Arms Manufactory is "played out." "
 

mofederal

Major
Joined
Jun 27, 2017
Location
Southeast Missouri
Here is a photo of a Warner Revolving Rifle, at two different versions. It is a big rifle, the cylinder looks massive. The Warner Rifle was not popular among soldiers during the Civil War because of one major flaw. The pre-loaded shots would sometimes fire when the chamber was not aligned with the cock. The stray shot would usually hit the shooter’s wrist, resulting in injury and often loss of the hand.

WarnerRifle_big.jpg


Warner_Revolving_Rifle (1).jpg
 
Last edited:

mofederal

Major
Joined
Jun 27, 2017
Location
Southeast Missouri
The Warner Rifle was not popular among soldiers during the Civil War because of one major flaw: The pre-loaded shots would sometimes fire when the chamber was not aligned with the cock. For a rifle, which is fired with one hand supporting the stock as you can see in the picture, the stray shot would usually hit the shooter’s wrist, resulting in injury and often loss of the hand.
 
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