★  Wagner, George D.

George Day Wagner

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Wagner.jpg


Born: September 22, 1829

Birthplace: Ross County, Ohio

Father: Johann Michael Wagner 1804 – 1866

Mother: Margaret Day 1805 – 1876

Wife: Frances Elizabeth Alexander 1831 – 1865
(Buried: Armstrong Chapel Cemetery, Green Hill, Indiana)​

Children:

Ella Minerva Wagner Bowyer 1850 – 1922​
(Buried: Armstrong Chapel Cemetery, Green Hill, Indiana)​
John Mason Wagner 1857 – 1908​
(Buried: Armstrong Chapel Cemetery, Green Hill, Indiana)​
Lilla Morton Wagner Bailey 1861 – 1882​
(Buried: Armstrong Chapel Cemetery, Green Hill, Indiana)​

Occupation before War:

Farmer in Warren County, Indiana​
Indiana State Representative​
Indiana State Senator​

Civil War Career:

1861 – 1863: Colonel of 15th Indiana Infantry Regiment​
1861: Served with his regiment in Western Virginia​
1862: Brigade Commander at the Battle of Shiloh, Tennessee​
1862 – 1863: Brigade Commander at the Battle of Stones River​
1863 – 1865: Brigadier General of Union Army, Volunteers​
1863: Brigade Commander during Battle of Chickamuga​
1863: Brigade Commander during Battle of Missionary Ridge​
1864: Brigade Commander at Battle of Kennesaw Mountain​
1864: Division Commander during Franklin – Nashville Campaign​
1864: His military Career would be ruined at Battle of Franklin​
1865: Served in St. Louis, Missouri during the end of the War​
1865: Mustered out of the Union Army in August​

Occupation after War:

1866 – 1869: Attorney in Williamsport, Indiana​
President of Indiana State Agriculture Society​
Helped publicize modern agriculture practices and procedures​

Died: February 13, 1869

Place of Death: Indianapolis, Indiana

Cause of Death: Overdose of a prescription medication

Age at time of Death: 39 years old

Burial Place: Armstrong Chapel Cemetery, Green Hill, Indiana
 
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Luke Freet

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George Day Wagner:
:us34stars:
Born: September 22, 1829View attachment 373748
Birthplace: Ross County Ohio
Father: Johann Michael Wagner 1804 – 1866
Mother: Margaret Day 1805 – 1876
Wife: Frances Elizabeth Alexander 1831 – 1865
(Buried: Armstrong Chapel Cemetery Green Hill Indiana)
Children:
Ella Minerva Wagner Bowyer 1850 – 1922
(Buried: Armstrong Chapel Cemetery Green Hill Indiana)
John Mason Wagner 1857 – 1908
(Buried: Armstrong Chapel Cemetery Green Hill Indiana)
Lilla Morton Wagner Bailey 1861 – 1882
(Buried: Armstrong Chapel Cemetery Green Hill Indiana)

Occupation before War:
Farmer in Warren County Indiana
Indiana State Representative
Indiana State Senator

Civil War Career:
1861 – 1863: Colonel of 15th​ Indiana Infantry Regiment
1861: Served with his regiment in Western Virginia
1862: Brigade Commander at the Battle of Shiloh Tennessee
1862 – 1863: Brigade Commander at the Battle of Stones River
1863 – 1865: Brigadier General of Union Army Volunteers
1863: Brigade Commander during Battle of Chickamuga
1863: Brigade Commander during Battle of Missionary Ridge
1864: Brigade Commander at Battle of Kennesaw Mountain
1864: Division Commander during Franklin – Nashville Campaign
1864: His military Career would be ruined at Battle of Franklin
1865: Served in St. Louis Missouri during the end of the War
1865: Mustered out of the Union Army in August

Occupation after War:
1866 – 1869: Attorney in Williamsport Indiana
President of Indiana State Agriculture Society
Helped publicize modern agriculture practices and procedures


Died:
February 13, 1869
Place of Death: Indianapolis Indiana
Cause of Death: overdose of a prescription medication
Age at time of Death: 39 years old
Burial Place: Armstrong Chapel Cemetery Green Hill Indiana
Wagner's division was the army rearguard at Spring Hill, nearly routed by Cleburne and his division, if it weren't for the actions of Emerson Opdycke's brigade halting the attack and pushing back Cleburne's veterans.
At Franklin, Wagner, drunk, decided to place his men in front of the fortified line, leaving the men exposed and endangering the line. Opdycke advised against it and was allowed to keep his men in reserve behind the main line.
Wagner's decision nearly resulted in Confederate victory, his men being overwhelmed by Cheatham's Corps as it made its charge, routing the men and preventing the main line from firing into Brown's and Cleburne's divisions in fear of Friendly fire. Only the actions of Opdycke prevented the Rebels from breaking through.
For his failures here, Wagner was removed from command.
 
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He was relieved of command for his "fiasco" at Franklin two days later and sent home to await orders.He was then sent to St. Louis and relegated to district command. When he was mustered out the following August he was not given the customary brevet.
 

DanSBHawk

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He was relieved of command for his "fiasco" at Franklin two days later and sent home to await orders.He was then sent to St. Louis and relegated to district command. When he was mustered out the following August he was not given the customary brevet.
Just going by memory, didn't he decide to resign after being busted down from brigade command to regimental command?

My impression was that he could have stayed with Thomas, but it would have been a demotion.
 
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I was under the impression that he commanded a brigade in the 2nd Division at Franklin, but further reading has him commanding the 2nd division , 4th Corps in the Army of the Cumberland at this time.And his superior at Franklin is given as Jacob Cox,but wasn't Cox in the 23rd Corps of the Army of the Ohio at this time?
 

Luke Freet

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I was under the impression that he commanded a brigade in the 2nd Division at Franklin, but further reading has him commanding the 2nd division , 4th Corps in the Army of the Cumberland at this time.And his superior at Franklin is given as Jacob Cox,but wasn't Cox in the 23rd Corps of the Army of the Ohio at this time?
Alright, I'll explain:
So, Wagner was the commander (by process of rank) of the 2nd Division, 4th Corps. At Franklin, 4th Corps was dispersed; Kimball had the far right flank; T. J. Wood was across the river; and Wagner was deployed in front of 23rd Corps' main line. It technically fell under Cox's jurisdiction, is what your sources are trying to say.
 
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Alright, I'll explain:
So, Wagner was the commander (by process of rank) of the 2nd Division, 4th Corps. At Franklin, 4th Corps was dispersed; Kimball had the far right flank; T. J. Wood was across the river; and Wagner was deployed in front of 23rd Corps' main line. It technically fell under Cox's jurisdiction, is what your sources are trying to say.
That part kind of makes sense,but wasn't Cox just technically just a brigadier as well?how is it that he was Wagner's superior?Cox was appointed major general in 1862 but somehow lost that rank as he had to be reappointed on Dec.7, 1864. Why did he have to be reappointed?
 

Luke Freet

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That part kind of makes sense,but wasn't Cox just technically just a brigadier as well?how is it that he was Wagner's superior?Cox was appointed major general in 1862 but somehow lost that rank as he had to be reappointed on Dec.7, 1864. Why did he have to be reappointed?
Cox was indeed a brigadier at the time. Still, he far outranked Wagner by date of rank, so he had seniority.
Not sure about the promotion thing. Those can be either due to mild political wranglings (considering he was a hardline democrat against emancipation and rights for blacks, that'd make sense for him to be voted down in a Republican controlled government); or just some paper getting lost in the shuffle.
 
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