Book Review Wade Hampton: Confederate Warrior to Southern Redeemer by Rod Andrew


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Has anyone else read this book? What did you think of it?
Yes, I have. Normally, I count on you, @Pat Young , to show us what was. You haven't done so here, unfortunately.

Rob Andrew's book is way deeper than your "review" implies. I'm not going to do it tonight, but this is a marker, I'm challenging you on each of your posts.

You chose to leave out what he said in his preface and shame on you for that. You also chose to leave out what he said about many of the issues you yourself have invoked.

Rob Andrew's book was not written to wag a finger at slavery, but to understand a man who lived in the middle of the 19th century. We'll use his text to show this, moving forward.

Stay tuned...
 
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"For some academic readers (that's you @Pat Young), my use of the term 'paternalism' will prove the most problematic. I am aware that a growing body of current scholarship treats claims of the southern master class to be paternalistic providers as masks for oppression."

- Source: Rob Andrew, Wade Hampton; Confederate Warrior to Southern Redeemer, p. xi
 
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I somehow missed all of this in the spring. Thanks for this, Pat. This next bit means nothing, except that it's a coincidence. Years ago I had a friend of my father's generation who was named for Wade Hampton. The gentleman was immensely proud of this fact. Oddly, at the time I met him I had never heard of his namesake. That came quite a bit later.
 

Pat Young

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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And it's dismaying when the 10% addressed is 'cherry picked' to advance the reviewer's agenda.
A book review is not a chapter by chapter recounting or synopsis of a book.

Generally, in my experience, "book reviews" take several forms:

1. The "Book Report"-We are all familiar with these from elementary and middle school. These are brief summaries of the book's author's plot or thesis, perhaps with a short assessment by the reviewer.
2. The daily newspaper review-These are similar to a movie review in a regional newspaper. They are typically 500-1000 words long and are primarily aimed at letting a reader know if he or she will like the book. They are a sort of consumer's guide to the book.
3. The weekly newspaper book review supplement style review-These are found in supplements like the New York Times Book Review-They are longer-form, typically 1,000-2,500 words long. While they focus on the book under consideration, they often also introduce information from outside the book. They also may focus, in historical works, on the subject of the book and not just the book itself.
4. Academic Reviews-Generally written by an academic expert on the subject matter that is the focus of the book. Written for credentialed specialists.
5. Long Form Reviews-Found in periodicals like the New York Review of Books. These discuss the subject of the book generally, as well as the book itself. These reviews are often 3,000-5,000 words.

Most of my reviews are of the third and fifth types.
 
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A book review is not a chapter by chapter recounting or synopsis of a book.

Generally, in my experience, "book reviews" take several forms:

1. The "Book Report"-We are all familiar with these from elementary and middle school. These are brief summaries of the book's author's plot or thesis, perhaps with a short assessment by the reviewer.
2. The daily newspaper review-These are similar to a movie review in a regional newspaper. They are typically 500-1000 words long and are primarily aimed at letting a reader know if he or she will like the book. They are a sort of consumer's guide to the book.
3. The weekly newspaper book review supplement style review-These are found in supplements like the New York Times Book Review-They are longer-form, typically 1,000-2,500 words long. While they focus on the book under consideration, they often also introduce information from outside the book. They also may focus, in historical works, on the subject of the book and not just the book itself.
4. Academic Reviews-Generally written by an academic expert on the subject matter that is the focus of the book. Written for credentialed specialists.
5. Long Form Reviews-Found in periodicals like the New York Review of Books. These discuss the subject of the book generally, as well as the book itself. These reviews are often 3,000-5,000 words.

Most of my reviews are of the third and fifth types.
Earlier, I was going to say that your sections read more or less like a synopsis. At least, they strike me that way. I should add that I think that's really nice.
 



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