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Vote In the Election of 1868

Discussion in 'Post Civil War History, The Reconstruction Period' started by Pat Young, Nov 1, 2016.

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Who Do You Vote For In The Election of 1868

  1. Ulysses S. Grant Republican Party

    23 vote(s)
    67.6%
  2. Horatio Seymour Democratic Party

    11 vote(s)
    32.4%
  1. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

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    Folks should fee free to put up campaign literature, posters, etc. from 1868 to help us see what the election looked like to voters 148 years ago.
     
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  3. MaryDee

    MaryDee Sergeant Major Trivia Game Winner

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    Here's a Seymour and Blair campaign song: https://www.loc.gov/resource/rbpe.24401600/
    "Send but white men to the White House,
    Have no negro idols there,
    Keep your eyes on Freedom's lighthouse,
    Vote for Seymour and for Blair!"

    Both the racist tone and the "poetry" get worse; alongside the song words is an alphabet with rhymes:
    "M's Miscegenation of black people and white,
    No democrat does in the doctrine delight.
    N is the Negro race, that 'twould vote white men down,
    O let us be careful and on villiany frown." [sic]

    Lots of other campaign literature at this site: https://www.loc.gov/rr/program/bib/elections/election1868.html

    I also found this humorous card here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Card1868USElectionGrantAndColfaxTanners.jpg
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

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    Thanks Mary. The racism is pretty explicit in Democratic campaign materials until at least 1872. Then you see some of the national Democrats try to figure out a way to win a portion of the black vote.
     
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  5. MaryDee

    MaryDee Sergeant Major Trivia Game Winner

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    I've been having fun looking these up! Here are some cartoons from Harper's Weekly.

    That's Seymour, the rising sun, shining over the White House while Grant and Colfax try to drag their followers there. Note Ben Butler with spoons. Thaddeus Stevens (fallen off the back) even looks a bit like like Tommy Lee Jones!
    [​IMG]


    And here's the evil Seymour, with more very bad poetry:
    [​IMG]


    Lots more of these (for both sides!) here: http://elections.harpweek.com/1868/cartoons-1868-list.asp?Year=1868
     
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  6. Bruce Vail

    Bruce Vail 2nd Lieutenant

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    What a revealing piece of folk art!

    I suppose your main interest is the figure of the drunken Irish at lower right.

    I still can't read the balloon. Can you?

    Best,
    Bruce
     
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  7. Bruce Vail

    Bruce Vail 2nd Lieutenant

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    'Hand of Treason, reeking red,
    Poison-fang of Copperhead'

    Geez, sounds like 2016!

    Thanks for adding.
     
  8. Bruce Vail

    Bruce Vail 2nd Lieutenant

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    [​IMG]



    Thomas Nast again.

    That's Seymour with the flag.
     
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  9. Bruce Vail

    Bruce Vail 2nd Lieutenant

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    [​IMG]


    Isn't this 1868........
     
  10. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

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    We are seeing some tightening in the race although Grant still leads by a wide margin.
     
  11. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

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    Wow.
     
  12. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

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    With just three days left in voting, Grant's lead is slipping.
     
  13. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

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  14. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

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    I am not sure. Anyone have an idea?
     
  15. John Winn

    John Winn Captain

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  16. MaryDee

    MaryDee Sergeant Major Trivia Game Winner

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    It's one of the Harper's Weekly cartoons by Thomas Nast, and yes, it's 1868.
    http://elections.harpweek.com/1868/cartoon-1868-Medium.asp?UniqueID=28&Year=1868

    Here's the very lengthy explanation:
    "This cartoon conveys one of Thomas Nast's recurrent messages: that the Democratic party suppresses the rights and threatens the safety of black Americans.

    "The caption lets the viewer know that the artist is specifically criticizing the Democratic party's opposition to Reconstruction legislation. The three standing figures represent what Nast considers to be the three wings of the Democratic party. The cartoonist incorporates into the picture several symbols and stereotypes that he uses frequently.

    "The figure on the left is a Catholic-Irish-American man. He wears working-class clothing, has an alcohol bottle in his hip pocket, a pipe and a cross in his hat, and holds a club in a striking position. The name on his hat-band-"5 Points"-refers to a neighborhood in New York City, populated at the time by poor Irish immigrants. The man's features are ape-like, a common way the Irish were portrayed in 19th-century illustrations.

    "In the background Nast adds the burning Colored Orphan Asylum and a lynched figure to remind viewers of the Irish-American and Democratic involvement in the Civil War draft riots in New York City. As New York governor, Seymour had vigorously opposed the draft and notoriously addressed the rioters as "My friends."

    "In sum, the Irish-American is depicted as a brutish, pugnacious, heavy-drinking, lower-class Catholic; a foreign element in the American electorate. Nast, an immigrant himself, usually celebrated America as a land of immigrants from many (including non-European) nations. Irish-Catholics were his one consistent exception.

    "The middle figure is Nathan Bedford Forrest, who represents the influence of former Confederates in the post-war Democratic party. He wears his Confederate uniform, with a lash-symbolizing slavery-in his back pocket, and stands ready to plunge a knife-signifying the Confederate war effort, "The Lost Cause"-into his black victim. On Forrest's coat is a medal honoring his command at Fort Pillow, the epitome of Confederate atrocities against black soldiers.

    "In the background, pictorially balancing the inflamed orphanage, Nast includes a burning freedmen's school, representing the violent resistance of many white Southerners to the freedom and advancement of blacks in society. Forrest was one of the organizers of the Ku Klux Klan.

    "The figure on the right is August Belmont, a financier who was the national chairman of the Democratic party. His apparel is upper-class, and the "5th Avenue" medallion on his coat refers to the wealthiest neighborhood in New York City where he lived (a numerical and cultural counterweight to "5 Points").

    "Republicans often charged Democrats with various types of vote fraud, so Nast draws Belmont holding aloft a packet of money designated for buying votes. One could infer that by contrast with the representative figures of Belmont and the Irish-American, that the Republican party is, in Nast's estimation, the party of the honest, hard-working, middle class.

    "Underneath the three Democratic characters is a black Union veteran, holding an American flag and reaching for a ballot box. Nast felt obliged to emphasize the fact that black men had earned the right to vote through their participation in the Union war effort. In having the Democrats trample the American flag, as well as the black man, the artist implies that they are attacking basic American principles and the entire nation, not merely one minority."
     
  17. Pat Young

    Pat Young Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Featured Book Reviewer

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  18. MaryDee

    MaryDee Sergeant Major Trivia Game Winner

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    Lots of stereotyping on both sides!
     
  19. roberts

    roberts Sergeant Trivia Game Winner

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    from here:

    http://loc.harpweek.com/LCPolitical...sp?MaxID=&UniqueID=22&Year=1868&YearMark=1866


    "Horses with the heads of Democratic candidate Horatio Seymour and running mate Francis P. Blair, Jr., pull a fine, ornate carriage in a race with a rude wagon drawn by ***** with the heads of Republican candidates Ulysses S. Grant and Schuyler Colfax. The Democratic carriage pulls ahead in the race, heading toward a cheering crowd and a series of floral arches held by young maidens. The U.S. Capitol is visible beyond. In the carriage are four allegorical figures: Liberty, holding the Constitution and a banner which reads "Our Glorious Union {grave}Distinct, like the Billows, One, Like the Sea' This is a White Man's Government!"; Navigation, holding a miniature ship; Agriculture, holding sheaves of wheat and a scythe; and Labor, represented by a bearded man with a hammer and flywheel.

    In contrast to the Democratic vehicle, the Republican wagon has stalled before a pile of rocks and a cemetery strewn with bones representing "100,000,000 White Lives, the Price of N----- Freedom!" Its wheels are blocked by a large stone "Killing Taxation" and a skeleton. Other stones represent "Ruined Commerce," "{dollar}30,000,000 stolen from the Treasury," and "Negro Supremacy." In the wagon are the grim reaper, Pennsylvania representative and abolitionist Thaddeus Stevens, an unidentified man, a black woman, and an idle black man.

    Stevens: "Colfax pulls like the d----l but old tangleleg [i.e., Grant] aint worth a d----n! Push at the tailboard, Ben!"

    Massachusetts representative and former Civil War general Benjamin F. Butler, pushing the wagon from the rear, replies, "I am pushing, Thad! but we are stuck. Seymour is a mile ahead now." Silver spoons protrude from Butler's pocket. (For the origins of Butler's nickname "Silver Spoons," see "The Radical Party on a Heavy Grade," no. 1868-14.)

    The black woman reassures Stevens, "Don't worry you'sef, honey, or you'll peg out afore we get de paeket for Seymour's in de White House and we's good for Salt River [colloquialism for political disaster]." The black man asks, "War's dis wagon gwine wid dis member ob Congress. I'd jes like to know?" The unidentified man remarks, "The Democracy would not take me so I thought I'd come back & stick by you Uncle Thad, and we'll all go to H-ll together!" Death announces, "My friends 1,000,000 slaughtered soldiers block the wheels--you fooled them, and they now impede your progress!"

    At bottom right a group of bummers, a term referring to party hangers-on, carpetbaggers, and other disreputable characters, stand in line to buy tickets to Salt River. At left New York "Tribune" editor Horace Greeley invites abolitionist preacher Henry Ward Beecher to play the thimblerig. Nearby a black couple in rags express their desire to return to their former master. At top right, next to the U.S. Capitol, a group of black youths in striped outfits dance and tumble about."

    edited to add - the unidentified man in the GOP wagon appears to be Salmon Chase.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2016
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  20. Malingerer

    Malingerer Sergeant Major

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    Grant, I suppose - but I have a bad feeling about this.
     
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  21. John Winn

    John Winn Captain

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    I've still got a vote to sell. If it's worth voting it's worth doing it twice.

    BJ
     
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