Visiting Pamplin Park, 149 years & 2 days after the Breakthrough

Mdiesel

First Sergeant
Joined
Sep 28, 2010
Location
Maryland
That is a great map and historic photo of the crater! I am going to use them in a PowerPoint presentation I will be making on the Battle of the Crater at the June meeting of my local Civil War Round Table group.
http://www.civilwarriors-wsfv-ca.org/index.htm

I also came across this period photo of the Mine entrance. It would also makes a good "Then vs Now."
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Mdiesel

First Sergeant
Joined
Sep 28, 2010
Location
Maryland
Great! This too is definitely going on my PowerPoint presentation!

It's cool looking but the more I look at the period photo, it just doesn't look right. The contour on the land around the enterance to the mine looks different there is no trench like depression leading up to the mine entrance as should be. The thought occurred to me that this may be the entrance to the failed Confederate mine or some other mine at Petersburg.
This is the site I found the photo on:

http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/petersburg/10-facts-about-the-petersburg.html
 

Greg Taylor

Sergeant Major
Joined
Apr 29, 2011
Location
Los Angeles
It's cool looking but the more I look at the period photo, it just doesn't look right. The contour on the land around the enterance to the mine looks different there is no trench like depression leading up to the mine entrance as should be. The thought occurred to me that this may be the entrance to the failed Confederate mine or some other mine at Petersburg.
This is the site I found the photo on:

http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/petersburg/10-facts-about-the-petersburg.html
On closer look, the terrain around the mine opening looks a bit odd but what convinced me that it is correctly identified is the opening of what appears to be the ventilation shaft above and slightly to the right of the tunnel line. The ventilation shaft was an ingenious and unique part of the mine. It's apparent position in this photo conforms with all the diagrams of the mine that I have seen. But another puzzlement to me is that I have never seen this photo before, and I have read 5 books and numerous articles about the Battle of the Crater over the years. It is a fabulous photograph and I would think I would have seen it before. I will look into this and report back any findings I might come up with.

In this diagram note the ventilation shaft position above the main gallery.

Vent Shaft.jpg
 

Mdiesel

First Sergeant
Joined
Sep 28, 2010
Location
Maryland
On closer look, the terrain around the mine opening looks a bit odd but what convinced me that it is correctly identified is the opening of what appears to be the ventilation shaft above and slightly to the right of the tunnel line. The ventilation shaft was an ingenious and unique part of the mine. It's apparent position in this photo conforms with all the diagrams of the mine that I have seen. But another puzzlement to me is that I have never seen this photo before, and I have read 5 books and numerous articles about the Battle of the Crater over the years. It is a fabulous photograph and I would think I would have seen it before. I will look into this and report back any findings I might come up with.

In this diagram note the ventilation shaft position above the main gallery.

View attachment 34306

Yes I see what you're talking about, & at first I thought it was spot on, but look back at the link to the photo it reads, "View of The Crater circa 1870. The exit of the mineshaft can be seen at the center of the image. (Library of Congress)"

Same mine wrong end? God knows why they would keep the mine exit open so it could collapse on someone's head but I guess they just weren't as safety conscious in the 19th century! Lol I'll keep looking for another photo you can use for the then & now enterance as I really don't think this is it. But still, if that's the mine "exit" in 1870 it's super cool!
 
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Mdiesel

First Sergeant
Joined
Sep 28, 2010
Location
Maryland
On closer look, the terrain around the mine opening looks a bit odd but what convinced me that it is correctly identified is the opening of what appears to be the ventilation shaft above and slightly to the right of the tunnel line. The ventilation shaft was an ingenious and unique part of the mine. It's apparent position in this photo conforms with all the diagrams of the mine that I have seen. But another puzzlement to me is that I have never seen this photo before, and I have read 5 books and numerous articles about the Battle of the Crater over the years. It is a fabulous photograph and I would think I would have seen it before. I will look into this and report back any findings I might come up with.

In this diagram note the ventilation shaft position above the main gallery.

View attachment 34306

This is also identified As "The Crater" but what appears as the mine looks more correct as the mine "entrance" tell me what you think?
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http://www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/civil_war_series/20/sec8.htm
 

Mdiesel

First Sergeant
Joined
Sep 28, 2010
Location
Maryland
image.jpg
The Confederates targeted several different objectives during the "Stedman" offensive. Fort Stedman & other strategic points on the "Front", needed to be taken for their strategy to work. One objective was fort battery #9. It was a part of the second line of union defenses. Today this area is kept as a battery exhibit for tourists. It's really cool! Hope you like the photos :smile:

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From this point on the line President Lincoln & Gen. Grant viewed the battlefield.
 

unionblue

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Member of the Year
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Ocala, FL (as of December, 2015).
View attachment 34336 The Confederates targeted several different objectives during the "Stedman" offensive. Fort Stedman & other strategic points on the "Front", needed to be taken for their strategy to work. One objective was fort battery #9. It was a part of the second line of union defenses. Today this area is kept as a battery exhibit for tourists. It's really cool! Hope you like the photos :smile:

View attachment 34335

View attachment 34337

From this point on the line President Lincoln & Gen. Grant viewed the battlefield.

Mdiesel.

EXCELLENT pictures! Enjoyed them very much.

Sincerely,
Unionblue
 

kealbo54

Sergeant Major
Joined
Apr 20, 2012
That's awesome Kealbo54, I saw the spot marked on the battlefield tour map but didn't have enough time to see it myself. I remember you saying how much you admired A. P. Hill & that you got to see his burial place in Richmond. Glad you will be able to participate in the 150 anniversary of his death next yr. If you don't mind me asking, what attracts you to A. P. Hill so much?
I really dont know,anymore.I have been a big Fan since way back in elementary schoool,and middle school..Its just one of those things,you know,like picking out your favorite super hero,and it just never leaves you.I suppose as it goes,back when I could get to a library and first started seeing actual pictures of him,I thought he just LOOKED the part!Goodness knows he made his share of mistakes and costly blunders,But it was never really about his heroic deeds that attracted me.I suppose,its just his entire persona...plus...he dressed really cool!heheh
 

Mdiesel

First Sergeant
Joined
Sep 28, 2010
Location
Maryland
I really dont know,anymore.I have been a big Fan since way back in elementary schoool,and middle school..Its just one of those things,you know,like picking out your favorite super hero,and it just never leaves you.I suppose as it goes,back when I could get to a library and first started seeing actual pictures of him,I thought he just LOOKED the part!Goodness knows he made his share of mistakes and costly blunders,But it was never really about his heroic deeds that attracted me.I suppose,its just his entire persona...plus...he dressed really cool!heheh

:thumbsup: Well he was pretty darn good when he wasn't ill! Not a great Corps commander but was at his best with a division. Saved the day for Lee at Antietam & that alone was a "hero" type feat! :wavespin:
 

theoldman

First Sergeant
Joined
Apr 22, 2013
Location
upper mid-west
View attachment 34336 The Confederates targeted several different objectives during the "Stedman" offensive. Fort Stedman & other strategic points on the "Front", needed to be taken for their strategy to work. One objective was fort battery #9. It was a part of the second line of union defenses. Today this area is kept as a battery exhibit for tourists. It's really cool! Hope you like the photos :smile:

View attachment 34335

View attachment 34337

From this point on the line President Lincoln & Gen. Grant viewed the battlefield.
Where were these pictures taken? It looks very much like Pamplin but I do not recall seeing them. At the Pertersburg BF we made a quick sortie to the Crater and did not spend time anywhere else.

Thanks again for the pictures, posts, and the thread. Great job!
 

Mdiesel

First Sergeant
Joined
Sep 28, 2010
Location
Maryland
Where were these pictures taken? It looks very much like Pamplin but I do not recall seeing them. At the Pertersburg BF we made a quick sortie to the Crater and did not spend time anywhere else.

Thanks again for the pictures, posts, and the thread. Great job!

Petersburg Battlefield self-guided driving tour stop number three. This is where Confederate Battery IX of the old Dimmock line existed. It was carried by the federals USCT's under "Baldy" Smith in the summer of 1864, they were stopped after capturing several points along this line this and gave Beauregard time to defend Petersburg with an ad hoc defense. This was totally "Baldy" Smiths call & fault! The Federals renewed there offensive the next day but it was to late as Lee was given time to shift troops south. The Federals met stiff resistance where they would have had hardly any the day before. This is one of the great gaffes of Civil War. Petersburg should have been taken eight months earlier than it was & about 70,000 casualties would have been spared!

From this position the federals used artillery to help stymie the tide of the Confederate offensive at Fort Stedman. Lincoln was visiting City Point and conferring with Grant and Meade the day before the attack on Fort Stedman. He viewed the battlefield from the area of this exhibit the next day, along with Grant. Lincoln was so impressed at what he saw that he have Gen. John F. Hartranft a battlefield promotion for retaking Stedman. Hartranft would later ride his fame for the counterattack on Stedman to become the Gov. of Pennsylvania (although many accounts validly proclaim that subordinate officers led the counter attack on Stedman prior to Hartranft).
 

Greg Taylor

Sergeant Major
Joined
Apr 29, 2011
Location
Los Angeles
This is also identified As "The Crater" but what appears as the mine looks more correct as the mine "entrance" tell me what you think?
View attachment 34333

View attachment 34334

http://www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/civil_war_series/20/sec8.htm
No, I've seen this photo many times, always identified as "the crater." I think the opening is just a passageway to get into the crater made after the fact. There appears to be a beaten footpath from the opening to the soldier sitting below.
 

Mdiesel

First Sergeant
Joined
Sep 28, 2010
Location
Maryland
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Then vs Now
Confederate battery number eight of the Dimmock Line was taken by the Federal assault in June 1864 by troops of the USCT's. This fortification was re-faced to the west and renamed Fort Friend as it was located on property of the Friend Family. This was one of the important objectives that needed to be taken by Confederates after the fall of Fort Stedman. The 6th and 57th North Carolina were met here by canister from the 11th Mass. Battery. Having been alerted of an assault pending on his position, Capt. Edward Jones placed his guns on the edge of a nearby ravine. He depressed them so that they would be able to fire on any advancing column of infantry. Cause of this foresight in positioning of his guns the Confederates and never reached his battery. With the coming of daylight the union artillerymen increasingly became the predators and not prey. The guns of Fort Friend were able to add their firepower to the ring of artillery fire that was stemming the Confederate attack.
 
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