Visited The Carter House At Franklin

Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Nathanb1

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Retired Moderator
Joined
Dec 31, 2009
Messages
33,060
Location
Smack dab in the heart of Texas
Fort Granger is also a great place to visit. There should be photos from our visit posted on the Larry Cockerham Memorial thread. Standing in the basement at the Carter House is just about the most amazing experience you can have. Carnton is also great, as is the Lotz House...heck anywhere in Franklin.

I will also encourage everyone to go to Winstead Hill and make the little climb up to the pavilion so you can use the relief map there and orient yourself. One thing about Franklin is that you can find your way around easily--everything is well-marked, and with the demise of the Pizza Hut and the little strip center with Domino's...well, things are going to get better and better.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Eric Wittenberg

2nd Lieutenant
Keeper of the Scales
Joined
Jun 2, 2013
Messages
3,468
Location
Columbus, OH
We visited both Carnton AND the Carter House. Eric Jacobson is doing some great work at both, but especially at the Carter House. The Carter family garden has been restored. Other land is being opened up and structures torn down. It looks very different there from my last visit in 2010. Kudos to Eric for doing a fabulous job.

For the next few months--until after the 150th--quite a few pieces of original furniture have been returned to the Carter house by the family on loan. VERY cool stuff to see. There's also a very nice exhibit on display at the visitor center at Carnton that's also temporary until after the 150th, but also well worth seeing.

The old golf course adjacent to Carnton is in the process of being interpreted. There are 25 markers on it now, and Eric is working on providing guides on that part of the battlefield.

Eric then took us on a tour of cavalry sites associated with the Tennessee Campaign, including my first-ever visit to the Spring Hill battle site.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

Buckeye Bill

1st Lieutenant
Forum Host
Civil War Photo Contest
Annual Winner
Joined
Jul 29, 2013
Messages
4,997
The Spring Hill battlefield is a wonderful venue to tour.

I was very impressed with my visit in 2012.
 

Buckeye Bill

1st Lieutenant
Forum Host
Civil War Photo Contest
Annual Winner
Joined
Jul 29, 2013
Messages
4,997
We visited both Carnton AND the Carter House. Eric Jacobson is doing some great work at both, but especially at the Carter House. The Carter family garden has been restored. Other land is being opened up and structures torn down. It looks very different there from my last visit in 2010. Kudos to Eric for doing a fabulous job.

For the next few months--until after the 150th--quite a few pieces of original furniture have been returned to the Carter house by the family on loan. VERY cool stuff to see. There's also a very nice exhibit on display at the visitor center at Carnton that's also temporary until after the 150th, but also well worth seeing.

The old golf course adjacent to Carnton is in the process of being interpreted. There are 25 markers on it now, and Eric is working on providing guides on that part of the battlefield.

Eric then took us on a tour of cavalry sites associated with the Tennessee Campaign, including my first-ever visit to the Spring Hill battle site.
Get a hold of a copy of the new Blue & Gray magazine about the Battle of Franklin. Eric wrote a wonderful article and the General's Tour is awesome!

Bill
 

nitrofd

Colonel
Joined
Jan 20, 2013
Messages
14,060
Location
north central florida
We visited both Carnton AND the Carter House. Eric Jacobson is doing some great work at both, but especially at the Carter House. The Carter family garden has been restored. Other land is being opened up and structures torn down. It looks very different there from my last visit in 2010. Kudos to Eric for doing a fabulous job.

For the next few months--until after the 150th--quite a few pieces of original furniture have been returned to the Carter house by the family on loan. VERY cool stuff to see. There's also a very nice exhibit on display at the visitor center at Carnton that's also temporary until after the 150th, but also well worth seeing.

The old golf course adjacent to Carnton is in the process of being interpreted. There are 25 markers on it now, and Eric is working on providing guides on that part of the battlefield.

Eric then took us on a tour of cavalry sites associated with the Tennessee Campaign, including my first-ever visit to the Spring Hill battle site.
I am very jealous of your trip.wish I was there!!!!!!!!
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

james99

Private
Joined
Jul 21, 2014
Messages
65
One thing in the Carter house I had not seen before was the sugar box. They had to lock up all the sugar so no one with a sugar addiction stole it.
 

hrobalabama

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 12, 2014
Messages
1,371
Location
Andalusia, AL
WINSTON GROOM, Forrest Gump author, is a historian. He has written several CW works.
His one on Vicksburg is outstanding.
 
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

ErnieMac

Brigadier General
Moderator
Forum Host
Silver Patron
Joined
May 3, 2013
Messages
8,947
Location
Pennsylvania
Was it seven generals killed, or six? All I remember is that one general didn't hit the porch.
Though early stories about Carnton had the bodies of four or five Confederate generals brought from the battlefield and placed on the back porch, researchers have determined there were only three: Patrick Cleburne, Hiram Granbury and Otho Strahl. General States Rights Gist was taken to a field hospital, then buried temporarily in a Franklin family cemetery. Gen. John Adams’ body was taken directly from the battlefield south, to his home in Pulaski, Tennessee, and mortally wounded Gen. John C. Carter was taken from the battlefield to the Harrison House, where he died several days later.
http://www.midtneyewitnesses.com/still-standing/franklin/carnton
 
Top