Value of Horse from Muster Roll for 9th Texas Cavalry and Question

Dave DuBrucq

Corporal
Joined
Oct 28, 2020
Location
Tennessee
That
My ancestor brought a horse worth $130 and a double barrel shotgun and sixshooter worth $15 to the 6th Texas Cavalry muster in Dallas in September 1861. It does not appear that the value for the horses were in the neighborhood of $20, nor had inflation hit yet when your man enlisted
That would amount to roughly 4,000 in today's dollars. A high price for a horse in an economy that paid wages in cents rather than dollars.
I stand by my grade horse estimate
Of $20. That is not to say your ancestor did not pay $130.
 

DaveBrt

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 6, 2010
Location
Charlotte, NC
That

That would amount to roughly 4,000 in today's dollars. A high price for a horse in an economy that paid wages in cents rather than dollars.
I stand by my grade horse estimate
Of $20. That is not to say your ancestor did not pay $130.
He and his family were ranchers, with plenty of horses for the five men and a herd of several hundred cattle. The family had arrived in north Texas before the Revolution, had fought in the war, and were probably the richest family in the county. Horses were raised and trained, not bought.
 

Dave DuBrucq

Corporal
Joined
Oct 28, 2020
Location
Tennessee
My ancestor brought a horse worth $130 and a double barrel shotgun and sixshooter worth $15 to the 6th Texas Cavalry muster in Dallas in September 1861. It does not appear that the value for the horses were in the neighborhood of $20, nor had inflation hit yet when your man enlisted.
As an aside to this. a horse could be purchased for as little as $10 or as much as $150 for a superior mount in the 1860s.
A grade horse is essentially a mixed breed, a mutt if you will. Even in today's dollars they bring 500 to a thousand. Much is made of breed and pedigrees today and those horses are 6,000 on the low end and 10 to 15 times that on the high end.
I can't imagine the average CS cavalryman taking a high end horse to war, but that seems to be what happened early in the war.
 

Dave DuBrucq

Corporal
Joined
Oct 28, 2020
Location
Tennessee
He and his family were ranchers, with plenty of horses for the five men and a herd of several hundred cattle. The family had arrived in north Texas before the Revolution, had fought in the war, and were probably the richest family in the county. Horses were raised and trained, not bought.
That makes perfect sense then!
 

DaveBrt

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 6, 2010
Location
Charlotte, NC
As an aside to this. a horse could be purchased for as little as $10 or as much as $150 for a superior mount in the 1860s.
A grade horse is essentially a mixed breed, a mutt if you will. Even in today's dollars they bring 500 to a thousand. Much is made of breed and pedigrees today and those horses are 6,000 on the low end and 10 to 15 times that on the high end.
I can't imagine the average CS cavalryman taking a high end horse to war, but that seems to be what happened early in the war.
They sent their sons to war, why not their best horses?
 

Kwheaton

Cadet
Joined
Jan 23, 2021
FYI


Richard Lowe, ed., A Texas Cavalry Officer's Civil War: The Diary and Letters of James C. Bates, (Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press, 1999.)

George L. Griscom, Homer L. Kerr, ed., Fighting With Ross' Texas Cavalry Brigade C.S.A.: The Diary of George L. Griscom, Adjutant, 9th Texas Cavalry Regiment, (Hillsboro, TX: Hill Jr. College Press, 1976.)

Found a copy of a texas Cavalry Officer's Civil War---on Ebay arrives today!
 

Kwheaton

Cadet
Joined
Jan 23, 2021
Just received "All Afire to Fight" By Martha L. Crabb. pg 10 "most men in the company rode good horses, ranging in value between $100 and $125." "The initial cost of equipping a cavalryman made that service unavailable to poor men or their sons."
 
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Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Location
Spotsylvania Virginia

Kwheaton

Cadet
Joined
Jan 23, 2021
Excellent work. The time and effort you put in this shows and you now have a great recorded history to pass to future generations. Congratulations
Thank you! It was quite a journey but I feel I have now given two of my ancestors a history that may have been missed or forgotten. I Will likely put this story into a book for grandchildren.
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Location
Spotsylvania Virginia
Thank you! It was quite a journey but I feel I have now given two of my ancestors a history that may have been missed or forgotten. I Will likely put this story into a book for grandchildren.
Great idea even if it’s just non-published essay. You can do a nice job working with UPS or FedEx to put it into a binder
 

bayouace

Corporal
Joined
Nov 22, 2020
Location
Louisiana
Later in the war, when a cavalryman lost his horse, and no replacement was available, didn't many get sent home on leave to come back with a suitable mount to rejoin their company?
 
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