Value of Horse from Muster Roll for 9th Texas Cavalry and Question

Kwheaton

Cadet
Joined
Jan 23, 2021
Found it fascinating that my ancestor's Muster roll had the vale of his Horse ($100) and Equipment ($18). (in today's dollars that would be about $3,000) My question did he supply his own horse or was this supplied to him? I note when he applied for a pension (Which was denied---I think because he did not identify his unit properly and was listed only by his initials) he states in 1906 he has two old mares valued at $50. So he was 70 years old but still had horses.
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Location
Spotsylvania Virginia
Found it fascinating that my ancestor's Muster roll had the vale of his Horse ($100) and Equipment ($18). (in today's dollars that would be about $3,000) My question did he supply his own horse or was this supplied to him? I note when he applied for a pension (Which was denied---I think because he did not identify his unit properly and was listed only by his initials) he states in 1906 he has two old mares valued at $50. So he was 70 years old but still had horses.
Hey Kwheaton welcome to CWTs thread on cavalry.
The Union supplied all horses. The Confederacy took a somewhat different approach. They supplied all horses except for cavalry and officers. In other words the CS government only supplied horses for supply wagons and artillery.
The decision by the south proved to be a bad choice - at least somewhat.
The confederate government paid their cavalrymen for using their own horse, but as the war grew longer and the supply of horses became less the law was devastating to the trooper. For example if his horse was killed or deemed unserviceable the government only gave the solder the value of the horse when he enlisted. As horses grew more valuable with the war dragging on, and the Confederate money devalued the southern cavalrymen couldn’t afford to buy a horse with the competition money- if he could find one!
If you want more details I will be glad to assist or point you in the right direction if I don’t know the answer. Also if you wish, most of the kinds of questions, like yours, are addressed in my book General Robert E Lee’s Warhorses, Newman Springs Publishing.
Again thanks for stopping by.
 

Kwheaton

Cadet
Joined
Jan 23, 2021
Thank you. I will look for your book. My ancestor William Marsh FRANKLIN 9th Texas Cavalry applied for a pension in 1906 and was disapproved even though he served. At the time he was 70 and wrote he was with John Rabbo Company detached. Where muster rolls show he was in service from Oct 14, 1861 until June 1864 with Company E 9 TX CAV Under Capt Joseph C Hart's Company at enlistment Later Co E J.W. At the time he had asthma and "smothering spells."
 

Kwheaton

Cadet
Joined
Jan 23, 2021
Found a advertisement that directly answers the question too.
9th texas Cavalry Standard_1862-07-12_1.png
 

Kwheaton

Cadet
Joined
Jan 23, 2021
According to the muster Roll he enlisted on Oct 14, 1861. It states Camp Reeves. There is no extant Enlistment paper. He was of Company E which was recruited From Red River County. He is listed on the Clarksville, Red River County Census in 1860. Note the rendezvous was in Clarksville on the 20th of August. I have ordered up the book All Afire to Fight : The Untold Tale of the Civil War's Ninth Texas Cavalry...so perhaps that will yield more. I feel like the beginnings of the story are coming together. His father Josiah Franklin was born 4 February in 1800 in what was then Georgia Territory but became Tuscaloosa Alabama. He moved to Red River Co. before 1855 and was a Farmer there. In 1860 AG Schedule he owned 6 horses.
 

Dave DuBrucq

Corporal
Joined
Oct 28, 2020
Location
Tennessee
Found it fascinating that my ancestor's Muster roll had the vale of his Horse ($100) and Equipment ($18). (in today's dollars that would be about $3,000) My question did he supply his own horse or was this supplied to him? I note when he applied for a pension (Which was denied---I think because he did not identify his unit properly and was listed only by his initials) he states in 1906 he has two old mares valued at $50. So he was 70 years old but still had horses.
Was that value in Confederate Dollars? If so I would postulate it was far less than $3,000 in today's money. Just saying.
He had two mares at age 70. I have a gelding and a mare at age 70 and still love to ride! I just don't bounce as easily as I did 20 years ago when unhorsed.
 
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Location
Spotsylvania Virginia
Was that value in Confederate Dollars? If so I would postulate it was far less than $3,000 in today's money. Just saying.
He had two mares at age 70. I have a gelding and a mare at age 70 and still love to ride! I just don't bounce as easily as I did 20 years ago when unhorsed.
In 1861 the Confederate $ was worth more that as the war went on. According to an online inflation calculation I ve come to depend on over the years he’s in the ballpark of $3k. I am not saying my inflation calculator is correct but I think it is relatively correct
 

Dave DuBrucq

Corporal
Joined
Oct 28, 2020
Location
Tennessee
In 1861 the Confederate $ was worth more that as the war went on. According to an online inflation calculation I ve come to depend on over the years he’s in the ballpark of $3k. I am not saying my inflation calculator is correct but I think it is relatively correct
Perhaps the value of the horse was inflated. If memory serves the average grade hose went for about $20.
 

Kwheaton

Cadet
Joined
Jan 23, 2021
The value was listed on his "Confederate" Muster Roll It would be in Oct 1861. The Value of his livestock which included horses 5 dairy cows and 27 cattle was $680 in 1860. So yes the value may have been inflated---but not as much as later in the war?
 

Kwheaton

Cadet
Joined
Jan 23, 2021
Okay the plot thickens each of William FRANKLIN's brothers served in Texas Cavalry:

Charles Pickney FRANKLIN Co A of 23rd TX Cavalry
Solomon Andrew (Jackson) FRANKLIN Wilson's 2 Battalion TX Cavalry

So I am guessing these brothers were avid horseman before the war.
 
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