USS Marietta not named for Georgia city


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Story

First Sergeant
Joined
Aug 5, 2011
Messages
1,539
Location
SE PA
#3
This can be Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon'd to the Civil War.

First commander of this gunboat was CDR Frederick Martin Symonds, USN
http://www.navsource.org/archives/12/09015.htm

Frederick Martin Symonds, rear admiral U. S. N., now retired and living in Galesville, Wis., was born in Watertown, N. Y., May 16, 1846, son of Charles F. and Louisa (Grannis) Symonds. His paternal grandfather was a captain in the United States Army in the War of 1812-15, and took part in the battle of Sackett’s Harbor. Charles F. Symonds, father of the Admiral, was born in New Haven, Conn., and was a miller the greater part of his life. During the Civil War he was marshal of the northern district of New York. He and his wife—the latter a native of Long Island—never came west of Utica, N. Y.

Frederick Martin Symonds was the third born in a family of six children. He attended school in Watertown, N. Y., and at the age of 16 years entered the Naval Academy, which during the period of the Civil War was located at Newport, R. I. While a member of his class he took part in a cruise after the Confederate steamer Tacony and also in a search for the rebel ship Alabama.
p.310
https://books.google.com/books?id=rNo4AQAAMAAJ&pg=PA310&lpg=PA310&dq=Frederick+Martin+Symonds&source=bl&ots=4RR_q-R_1V&sig=oBxSusa3OOm5P3H9pxWYWV0Pci4&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj-z8-H9IbSAhUBwmMKHc8DCxgQ6AEIQDAL#v=onepage&q=Frederick Martin Symonds&f=false
 
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
13,263
#4
The ships of the "Steel Navy" era (circa 1885 to 1900) were an absolute visual delight. They were typically painted with white hulls and buff- or ocher-colored upper works, black gun barrels, and frequently had gilded scrollwork carved from wood affixed at the bow and stern.

22987ea1f1db9e6235987c02e6702728.jpg
 
Last edited:
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Messages
13,210
Location
Mississippi
#5
They were typically painted with white hulls and buff- or ocher-colored upper works,
Historically and until this day, the US Coast Guard has carried on a version of this traditional color scheme on some of their vessels.

650_ship_2.jpg

http://forum.woodenboat.com/archive/index.php/t-151172.html

ggdukw.jpg

http://cs.finescale.com/fsm/modeling_subjects/f/7/p/158962/1722354.aspx

For more information, not to mention a really exciting & page turning read about this topic. :wink:

I highly recommend:
https://www.uscg.mil/history/docs/USCG_Painting_Regs_1965.pdf
 

Carronade

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Aug 4, 2011
Messages
4,406
Location
Pennsylvania
#7
Old Texas looks positively lovely, great job on the colorization.

Bit of trivia, although Texas is considered our first battleship, she never received a hull number. BB-1 was USS Indiana.

Texas' contemporary Maine became ACR-1 (armored cruiser) but was often referred to as a battleship. The concept of the armored cruiser had evolved during Maine's lengthy construction; subsequent cruisers starting with New York (ACR-2) were quite different.
 



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