Unforgettable Dogs of War

shooter too

Private
Joined
Mar 4, 2021
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LoyaltyOfDogs

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Location
Gettysburg area
Joel C. Archer of Granbury, Texas, was ever grateful for the hunting prowess of his regiment’s canine companion Reb, who was probably a terrier. He shared this reminiscence with Mamie Yeary for the 1912 book, “Reminiscences of the Boys In Gray, 1861-1865” (available courtesy of the Internet Archive).

“We have lived on parched corn, waded creeks, and fought battles in
wet clothes, with nothing to eat but cold cornbread, when it seemed to
me the sweetest morsel I ever tasted. But the hardest time I ever had
in getting something to eat was when I was on Johnson's Island after the
Federals had cut off our rations. I was one of those who hunted rats with
the little dog ‘Reb.’ And a baked rat tasted to me then like a good, fat
squirrel would now. If this ever gees into print and any of the ‘Johnson
Island’ boys see it they will remember the little dog ‘Reb.’ He was so
small that he could crawl into a big rat hole and pull them out.”
 
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Llewellyn

Corporal
Joined
Feb 17, 2020
Location
Britain
Spot the dog !


Though it may not be immediately obvious, there is a link between this photograph and the ACW.

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Taken at Richmond on November 4th, 1943, the parade marks the departure of the 361st Fighter Group for the European Theater of Operations, where the group would join the Eighth Air Force in eastern England.

The Group Commander was Major Thomas Jonathan Jackson Christian, great grandson of Stonewall. I cannot recognise him in the photo, but he must be in there.

Lt Colonel Christian was killed in action over north-east France on 12 August 1944 whilst attacking marshalling yards at Arras. It is believed that he was buried within the confines of a British WW1 cemetery, but his exact gravesite has not been located.
 

LoyaltyOfDogs

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Location
Gettysburg area

LoyaltyOfDogs

Sergeant Major
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Location
Gettysburg area
Though she is unnamed in this reminiscence, a faithful dog was fondly and gratefully remembered by George H. Gordon, former colonel of the Second Massachusetts Infantry, in his 1882 memoir "War Diary of Events in the War of the Great Rebellion. 1861-1865."

After the Union defeat at Chancellorsville in 1863, Gordon recalled,

"The return of my adjutant-general with a bandaged head, a bullet having struck him at Chancellorsville, and the fact that he brought with him our faithful staff-dog, filled headquarters with unusual happiness. Through Pope's unfortunate march in Maryland, through the victorious onslaught of South Mountain and Antietam, through the cold winter of 1862 on the Potomac and at Stafford Court House, this dog was ever a loving friend and companion; and she cheered and relieved more gloomy hours than could have many a so-called nobler animal. Nestling in my lap, or sleeping upon my bed as of old, forgetting neither friend nor foe during her absence, she showed human attributes in snarling at a servant who had saved her life at Stafford Court House, by forcing her to take a dose of castor oil.”

The little dog appears in the book's index as well, again unnamed, as follows: "Dog, a favorite, belonging to the writer's staff, —allusion to, 61"

Many thanks to civilwardigital.com for preserving Col. Gordon's book!
 
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